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HPV vaccines and adverse effects

Sasidharanpillai Sabeena, Parvati V Bhat, Veena Kamath, Govindakarnavar Arunkumar
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections continue to be one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. The oncogenic potential of this virus was well established in anogenital malignancies and oropharyngeal cancers. Even though a fall in cervical cancer rates has been reported worldwide, the subsequent rise in HPV-associated head and neck cancers among men and women have been reported from developed countries, necessitating the vaccination of adolescent boys as well. The objective of this narrative review is to provide an update on the current status of HPV vaccination worldwide...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research
Masaharu Kamada, Hiroaki Inui, Tomohiro Kagawa, Ayuka Mineda, Takao Tamura, Tomohito Fujioka, Takahiro Motoki, Hiroki Hirai, Eiichi Ishii, Minoru Irahara
AIM: We conducted a self-administered survey on the perception of teachers toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to determine the ways to increase their willingness to encourage its use. METHODS: Answers were obtained both prior to and after having the teachers read five brief information articles: (i) cervical cancer knowledge, (ii) vaccine knowledge, (iii) result of a survey in Nagoya, (iv) news report of the World Health Organization statement and (v) articles written by Dr Muranaka, a journalist...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research
Jean-Luc Brun, José Rajaonarison, Nicolas Nocart, Laura Hoarau, Stéphanie Brun, Isabelle Garrigue
Targeted immunotherapy of high-grade cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) has been developed as an alternative to conization, to preserve future reproductive outcomes and avoid human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence. The objectives of the review are to present drugs according to their process of development and to examine their potential future use. A search for key words associated with CIN and targeted immunotherapy was carried out in the Cochrane library, Pubmed, Embase, and from 1990 to 2016...
February 2018: Molecular and Clinical Oncology
Beverley Lawton, Anna S Howe, Nikki Turner, Sara Filoche, Tania Slatter, Celia Devenish, Noelyn Anne Hung
BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that HPV infection is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth (PTB), and pre-eclampsia. We aimed to determine if prior HPV vaccination reduced adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: A New Zealand population-based retrospective study linking first pregnancy outcome data (2008-2014 n = 35,646) with prior quadrivalent HPV vaccination status. Primary outcomes were likelihood (odds ratios, ORs) of PTB, pre-eclampsia, and stillbirth...
January 2, 2018: Vaccine
Daron G Ferris, Rudiwilai Samakoses, Stanley L Block, Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce, Jaime Alberto Restrepo, Jesper Mehlsen, Archana Chatterjee, Ole-Erik Iversen, Amita Joshi, Jian-Li Chu, Andrea Likos Krick, Alfred Saah, Rituparna Das
OBJECTIVES: We describe the final 10-year data for the long-term follow-up study of the 4-valent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccine in preadolescents and adolescents. METHODS: In the base study (V501-018), 1661 sexually inactive boys and girls received the 4vHPV vaccine (early vaccination group [EVG], managed for 9.9 years) or a placebo at day 1, month 2, and month 6. Thereafter, at month 30, the placebo group (catch-up vaccination group [CVG], managed for 7.4 years) received the 4vHPV vaccine by using the same dosing schedule...
December 2017: Pediatrics
Kate Faasse, Jarry T Porsius, Jonathan Faasse, Leslie R Martin
BACKGROUND: Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. METHODS: The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7...
December 14, 2017: Vaccine
Tsuyoshi Okuhara, Hirono Ishikawa, Masahumi Okada, Mio Kato, Takahiro Kiuchi
OBJECTIVE: In Japan, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rate has sharply fallen to nearly 0% due to sensational media reports of adverse events. Online anti-HPV-vaccination activists often warn readers of the vaccine's dangers. Here, we aimed to examine frequently appearing contents on pro- and anti-HPV vaccination websites. METHODS: We conducted online searches via two major search engines (Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan). Targeted websites were classified as "pro," "anti," or "neutral" according to their claims, with the author(s) classified as "health professionals," "mass media," or "laypersons...
September 23, 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
Masaaki Sawada, Yutaka Ueda, Asami Yagi, Akiko Morimoto, Ruriko Nakae, Reisa Kakubari, Hazuki Abe, Tomomi Egawa-Takata, Tadashi Iwamiya, Shinya Matsuzaki, Eiji Kobayashi, Kiyoshi Yoshino, Tadashi Kimura
BACKGROUND: In Japan, the cervical cancer preventative HPV vaccination rate has dramatically declined, directly as a result of repeated broadcasts of so-called adverse events and the resulting suspension of the government's recommendation. Our previous survey of obstetricians and gynecologists in Japan regarding their opinions toward HPV vaccination revealed that these key specialists were as negatively influenced by the reports of purported negative events as were the general population...
October 6, 2017: International Journal of Clinical Oncology
Julia M L Brotherton, Paul N Bloem
Persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of cervical cancer, as well as cancers of the anus, penis, vulva, vagina and oropharynx. There is good evidence that prophylactic HPV vaccines are immunogenic and effective against targeted-type HPV infections and type-specific genital lesions, including high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), when administered prior to HPV infection. There is good evidence that HPV vaccines are safe in population usage, with the most frequent adverse event being injection-site reactions...
September 6, 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Silvia de Sanjosé, Maria Brotons, Miguel Angel Pavón
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a small double-stranded DNA virus that commonly infects humans. The oncogenic characteristics of HPV derive from the oncoproteins E6 and E7 that act inhibiting p53 and pRB tumor suppressors. About 5% of all cancers worldwide are attributable mainly to those known as high-risk, including HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, and 59. Infection with HPV is common after sexual initiation, but the majority of HPV infections do not cause symptoms or disease and are cleared within 12-24 months post-infection...
February 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Karen Canfell, Michael Caruana, Val Gebski, Jessica Darlington-Brown, Stella Heley, Julia Brotherton, Dorota Gertig, Chloe J Jennett, Annabelle Farnsworth, Jeffrey Tan, C David Wrede, Philip E Castle, Marion Saville
BACKGROUND: Using primary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for cervical screening increases detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplastic lesions and invasive cancer (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ [CIN2+]) compared to cytology, but no evaluation has been conducted in a population previously offered HPV vaccination. We aimed to assess colposcopy referral and CIN2+ detection rates for HPV-screened versus cytology-screened women in Australia's HPV-vaccinated population (by 2014, resident women ≤33 years had been age-eligible for HPV vaccination, with 3-dose uptake across age cohorts being about 50%-77%)...
September 2017: PLoS Medicine
Hiroyuki Yoshikawa
Four years have passed since HPV vaccination "crisis" occurred in June 2013. In Japan,a publicly funded HPV vaccination program for adolescent females aged 12-16 years began in December 2010. However,the Japanese government withdrew its recommendation for HPV vaccination in June, 2013 because news reports on potential adverse effects of HPV vaccines without any medical evidence appeared repeatedly. The vaccination coverage among adolescent females decreased quickly from around 70%in females born between 1994 and 1999 to only 1%in females born since 2001 over the country...
September 2017: Gan to Kagaku Ryoho. Cancer & Chemotherapy
Lene Wulff Krogsgaard, Claus Høstrup Vestergaard, Oleguer Plana-Ripoll, Tina Hovgaard Lützen, Mogens Vestergaard, Morten Fenger-Grøn, Bodil Hammer Bech, Dorte Rytter
OBJECTIVE: The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has increasingly been suspected of adverse effects in Denmark since 2013. By using consultations with the general practitioner (GP) as an indicator for morbidity, this study aims to examine the association between HPV vaccination and morbidity in girls in the Danish childhood immunization program. METHODS: The study is a nationwide register-based cohort study. Both the HPV and the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccines were offered to 12-year-old girls in Denmark in the study period (2008-2015)...
2017: PloS One
Ana Paula Ferreira Costa, Ricardo Ney Oliveira Cobucci, Janine Medeiros da Silva, Paulo Henrique da Costa Lima, Paulo César Giraldo, Ana Katherine Gonçalves
Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) has been progressively implemented in most developed countries for approximately 10 years. In order to increase the protection of the vaccines, a 9-valent vaccine (HPV9) was developed, which provides protection against nine types of the virus. Studies evaluating its safety are rare. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis of three clinical trials assessing adverse effects on women randomly vaccinated with HPV9 or tetravalent vaccine (HPV4), with the objective of analyzing whether the HPV9 is as safe as HPV4...
2017: Journal of Immunology Research
Louiza S Velentzis, Michael Caruana, Kate T Simms, Jie-Bin Lew, Ju-Fang Shi, Marion Saville, Megan A Smith, Sarah J Lord, Jeffrey Tan, Deborah Bateson, Michael Quinn, Karen Canfell
Primary HPV screening enables earlier diagnosis of cervical lesions compared to cytology, however, its effect on the risk of treatment and adverse obstetric outcomes has not been extensively investigated. We estimated the cumulative lifetime risk (CLR) of cervical cancer and excisional treatment, and change in adverse obstetric outcomes in HPV unvaccinated women and cohorts offered vaccination (>70% coverage in 12-13 years) for the Australian cervical screening program. Two-yearly cytology screening (ages 18-69 years) was compared to 5-yearly primary HPV screening with partial genotyping for HPV16/18 (ages 25-74 years)...
December 15, 2017: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
Thomas C Mitchell, Carolyn R Casella
Development of non-infectious subunit vaccines is hampered by a slow pipeline of new adjuvants to replace or enhance alum in part because expectations of safety are high. Transient vaccine side effects are not clinical priorities because they cause no lasting harm and vaccine development has appropriately been focused on avoidance of serious adverse events. As a result, surprisingly little is known about the extent to which side effects caused by a vaccine's reactogencicity are predictive of successful immunization outcomes...
August 2017: Current Opinion in Immunology
Yukari Ogawa, Hinako Takei, Ryuichi Ogawa, Kiyoshi Mihara
BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been shown to be effective for the eradication of HPV and prevention of cervical cancer. However, the number of women who receive HPV vaccinations has decreased over the last several years in Japan, due to concerns about adverse reactions associated with the vaccines. We evaluated the safety of three types of HPV vaccines separately in young women and the difference in the risk of adverse reactions between HPV and other vaccines by conducting a meta-analysis...
2017: Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences
Paolo Bonanni, Beatrice Zanella, Francesca Santomauro, Chiara Lorini, Angela Bechini, Sara Boccalini
Vaccines stimulate a person's immune system to produce an adequate reaction against a specific infectious agent; i.e. the person is protected from that disease without having to get it first. As vaccines are administrated to healthy subjects, they are held to the highest standards of safety. Regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, at present three prophylactic vaccines are licensed (bivalent HPV 16/18, quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 and the nonovalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine). Pre- and post-licensure studies (i...
June 10, 2017: Vaccine
Katherine E Gallagher, Natasha Howard, Severin Kabakama, Sandra Mounier-Jack, Ulla K Griffiths, Marta Feletto, Helen E D Burchett, D Scott LaMontagne, Deborah Watson-Jones
OBJECTIVE: To synthesise lessons learnt and determinants of success from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine demonstration projects and national programmes in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs). METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 56 key informants. A systematic literature review identified 2936 abstracts from five databases; after screening 61 full texts were included. Unpublished literature, including evaluation reports, was solicited from country representatives; 188 documents were received...
2017: PloS One
Hirokuni Beppu, Masumi Minaguchi, Kiyoshi Uchide, Kunihiko Kumamoto, Masato Sekiguchi, Yukari Yaju
The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been linked to a number of serious adverse reactions. The range of symptoms is diverse and they develop in a multi-layered manner over an extended period of time. The argument for the safety and effectiveness of the HPV vaccine overlooks the following flaws: (i) no consideration is given to the genetic basis of autoimmune diseases, and arguments that do not take this into account cannot assure the safety of the vaccine; (ii) the immune evasion mechanisms of HPV, which require the HPV vaccine to maintain an extraordinarily high antibody level for a long period of time for it to be effective, are disregarded; and (iii) the limitations of effectiveness of the vaccine...
April 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
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