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OSA injuries

Xu Wu, Wenyu Gu, Huan Lu, Chengying Liu, Biyun Yu, Hui Xu, Yaodong Tang, Shanqun Li, Jian Zhou, Chuan Shao
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) associated chronic kidney disease is mainly caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) triggered tissue damage. Receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are expressed on renal cells and mediate inflammatory responses in OSA-related diseases. To determine their roles in CIH-induced renal injury, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), the RAGE neutralizing antibody, was intravenously administered in a CIH model. We also evaluated the effect of sRAGE on inflammation and apoptosis...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
İsa Yuvacı, Emine Pangal, Nurettin Bayram, Sevgi Arık Yüksel, Bedirhan Alabay, Alperen Ağadayı, Ender Sırakaya, Ahmet Gülhan
PURPOSE: Evaluation of the nerve fiber thicknesses of the macula, choroid, and retina using the apnea-hypopnea index in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) without systemic components. METHODS: Prospective, controlled study. The central macular, choroidal, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses were evaluated using enhanced depth imaging-spectral domain optical coherence tomography in individuals with OSAS. In people with severe OSAS who had received treatment, posterior ocular structures were examined over 3 months (4th and 12th weeks), and changes were evaluated...
July 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia
Julia L Chapman, Yasmina Serinel, Nathaniel S Marshall, Ronald R Grunstein
Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but it is also common in the general population. When sleepiness remains after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA, comorbid conditions or permanent brain injury before CPAP therapy may be the cause of the residual sleepiness. There is currently no broad approach to treating residual EDS in patients with OSA. Individual assessment must be made of comorbid conditions and medications, and of lifestyle factors that may be contributing to the sleepiness...
September 2016: Sleep Medicine Clinics
Mak Adam Daulatzai
Aging, hypertension, diabetes, hypoxia/obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), obesity, vitamin B12/folate deficiency, depression, and traumatic brain injury synergistically promote diverse pathological mechanisms including cerebral hypoperfusion and glucose hypometabolism. These risk factors trigger neuroinflammation and oxidative-nitrosative stress that in turn decrease nitric oxide and enhance endothelin, Amyloid-β deposition, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and blood-brain barrier disruption. Proinflammatory cytokines, endothelin-1, and oxidative-nitrosative stress trigger several pathological feedforward and feedback loops...
June 27, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Sudhakar Tummala, Bhaswati Roy, Bumhee Park, Daniel W Kang, Mary A Woo, Ronald M Harper, Rajesh Kumar
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent upper airway blockage, with continued diaphragmatic efforts to breathe during sleep. Brain structural changes in OSA appear in various regions, including white matter sites that mediate autonomic, mood, cognitive, and respiratory control. However, the relationships between brain white matter changes and disease severity in OSA are unclear. This study examines associations between an index of tissue integrity, magnetization transfer (MT) ratio values (which show MT between free and proton pools associated with tissue membranes and macromolecules), and disease severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) in OSA subjects...
October 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Radostina Vlaeva Cherneva, Zheina Vlaeva Cherneva, Ognian Borisov Georgiev, Daniela Stoichkova Petrova, Julia Ivanova Petrova
BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and inflammation are assumed as the main pathological triggers for vascular damage in hypersomnolent obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients, whereas their exact role in less symptomatic population is currently unknown. AIM: To determine whether oxidative stress (urinary 8-isoprostane concentration) and inflammation (plasma resistin levels) are associated with vascular damage in non-hypersomnolent (Epworth Sleep Score <11) OSA patients...
June 3, 2016: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
Jason H Mateika, Dragana Komnenov
Over the past three decades exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) has generally been considered a stimulus associated with a number of detrimental outcomes. However, there is sufficient evidence to link IH to many beneficial outcomes but they have largely been ignored, particularly in the field of sleep medicine in the United States. Recent reviews have postulated that this apparent contradiction is related to the severity and duration of exposure to IH; mild forms of IH initiate beneficial outcomes while severe forms of IH are coupled to detrimental consequences...
May 8, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Wojciech Trzepizur, Jérôme Boursier, Yasmina Mansour, Marc Le Vaillant, Sylvaine Chollet, Thierry Pigeanne, Acya Bizieux-Thaminy, Marie-Pierre Humeau, Claire Alizon, François Goupil, Nicole Meslier, Pascaline Priou, Paul Calès, Frédéric Gagnadoux
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may contribute to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We performed a multisite cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between the severity of OSA and blood markers of liver steatosis (using the hepatic steatosis index), cytolysis (based on alanine aminotransferase activity), and significant liver fibrosis (based on the FibroMeter [Echosens] nonalcoholic fatty liver disease score) in 1285 patients with suspected OSA in France. After adjusting for confounders including central obesity, the risk of liver steatosis increased with the severity of OSA (P for trend < ...
May 5, 2016: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Manish R Maski, Robert J Thomas, S Ananth Karumanchi, Samir M Parikh
BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a well-established risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. More recently, OSA has been implicated as an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-accepted early biomarker of subclinical kidney tubular injury, preceding an increase in serum creatinine. The goal of this study was to determine if an association exists between OSA and increased urinary NGAL levels...
2016: PloS One
Bumhee Park, Jose A Palomares, Mary A Woo, Daniel W Kang, Paul M Macey, Frisca L Yan-Go, Ronald M Harper, Rajesh Kumar
INTRODUCTION: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) subjects show impaired autonomic, affective, executive, sensorimotor, and cognitive functions. Brain injury in OSA subjects appears in multiple sites regulating these functions, but the integrity of functional networks within the regulatory sites remains unclear. Our aim was to examine the functional interactions and the complex network organization of these interactions across the whole brain in OSA, using regional functional connectivity (FC) and brain network topological properties...
March 2016: Brain and Behavior
Glaucylara R Geovanini, Alexandre C Pereira, Luis H W Gowdak, Luciana Oliveira Cascaes Dourado, Nilson T Poppi, Gabriela Venturini, Luciano F Drager, Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) severity with markers of overnight myocardial injury in patients with refractory angina. METHODS: Patients with refractory angina were characterised clinically and they underwent ischaemia imaging stress tests by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and/or cardiac MRI. The patients were admitted to the hospital, remained under resting conditions for blood determination of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) at 14:00, 22:00 and after overnight polysomnography at 7:00...
August 1, 2016: Heart: Official Journal of the British Cardiac Society
Junping Wu, Xin Sun, Qi Wu, Hongwei Li, Li Li, Jing Feng, Subei Zhang, Long Xu, Kuan Li, Xue Li, Xing Wang, Huaiyong Chen
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic condition characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and subsequent reoxygenation (ROX). The gastrointestinal system, which is particularly sensitive to tissue hypoxia and reduced perfusion, is likely to be affected by OSA. A rat model of IH was used to analyze oxidative stress-associated genes and tight junction proteins by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, altered morphology of the duodenal mucosa and elevated Chiu scores were observed in the IH‑exposed rats...
May 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Robert M Wolfe, Jonathan Pomerantz, Deborah E Miller, Rebecca Weiss-Coleman, Tony Solomonides
The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed...
March 2016: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
Sergio Garbarino, Ottavia Guglielmi, Antonio Sanna, Gian Luigi Mancardi, Nicola Magnavita
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the single most important preventable medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and driving accidents. OSA may also adversely affect work performance through a decrease in productivity, and an increase in the injury rate. Nevertheless, no systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between OSA and work accidents has been performed thus far. METHODS: PubMed, PsycInfo, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched...
2016: Sleep
Bumhee Park, Jose A Palomares, Mary A Woo, Daniel W Kang, Paul M Macey, Frisca L Yan-Go, Ronald M Harper, Rajesh Kumar
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by tissue injury to the insular cortices, areas that regulate autonomic pain, dyspnea, and mood, all of which are affected in the syndrome. Presumably, the dysregulation of insular-related functions are mediated by aberrant functional connections with other brain regions; however, the integrity of the functional connectivity (FC) to other sites is undescribed. Our aim was to examine resting-state FC of the insular cortices to other brain areas in OSA, relative to control subjects...
2016: Sleep
Anabel L Castro-Grattoni, Roger Alvarez-Buvé, Marta Torres, Ramon Farré, Josep M Montserrat, Mireia Dalmases, Isaac Almendros, Ferran Barbé, Manuel Sánchez-de-la-Torre
BACKGROUND: Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is the principal injurious factor involved in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. The gold standard for treatment is CPAP, which eliminates IH and appears to reduce cardiovascular risk. There is no experimental evidence on the reversibility of cardiovascular remodeling after IH withdrawal. The objective of the present study is to assess the reversibility of early cardiovascular structural remodeling induced by IH after resumption of normoxic breathing in a novel recovery animal model mimicking OSA treatment...
June 2016: Chest
Zachary B Rodgers, Sarah E Leinwand, Brendan T Keenan, Lohith G Kini, Richard J Schwab, Felix W Wehrli
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with extensive neurologic comorbidities. It is hypothesized that the repeated nocturnal apneas experienced in patients with OSA may inhibit the normal apneic response, resulting in hypoxic brain injury and subsequent neurologic dysfunction. In this study, we applied the recently developedOxFlowMRI method for rapid quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during a volitional apnea paradigm. MRI data were analyzed in 11 OSA subjects and 10 controls (mean ± SD apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 43...
April 2016: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Jie Li, Yan-Lin Zhang, Rui Chen, Yi Wang, Kang-Ping Xiong, Jun-Ying Huang, Fei Han, Chun-Feng Liu
BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with elevated liver enzymes and fatty liver. The purpose of this study was to measure serum liver enzyme levels in patients evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and the factors associated with liver injury in OSAS patients. METHODS: All patients referred to PSG for evaluation of sleep apnea symptoms between June 2011 and November 2014 were included in this study. Demographic data and PSG parameters were recorded...
November 20, 2015: Chinese Medical Journal
Ingrid Jullian-Desayes, Renaud Tamisier, Jean-Pierre Zarski, Judith Aron-Wisnewsky, Sandrine H Launois-Rollinat, Candice Trocme, Patrick Levy, Marie Joyeux-Faure, Jean-Louis Pepin
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) could be an independent risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurrence and progression. The impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on non-invasive markers of NAFLD has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 6-12 weeks of effective CPAP on the FibroMax test (comprising components including the SteatoTest, NashTest and FibroTest) through three randomized sham controlled studies...
February 2016: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
Ya-Ning Zhao, Hong-Yang Wang, Jian-Min Li, Bao-Yuan Chen, Guo Xia, Pan-Pan Zhang, Yan-Lei Ge
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), characterized by intermittent hypoxia/re‑oxygenation, may impair the cerebral system. Although mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was observed to have a key role in hypoxia‑induced brain injury, the intracellular events and their underlying mechanisms for intermittent hypoxia/re‑oxygenation-associated damage to hippocamal MAPKs, including extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, P38MAPK and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) remain to be elucidated and require further investigation...
January 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
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