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Opiate research

Curtis Bone, Lilian Gelberg, Mani Vahidi, Barbara Leake, Julia Yacenda-Murphy, Ronald M Andersen
OBJECTIVE: The Affordable Care Act encourages integration of behavioral health into primary care. We aim to estimate the level of under-reporting of drug use in federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) among self-reported risky drug users. METHODS: Adult patients in the waiting rooms of 4 FQHCs who self-reported risky drug use on the screening instrument World Health Organization's Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (score 4-26), who participated in the "Quit Using Drugs Intervention Trial," submitted urine samples for drug testing...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Addiction Medicine
Emma Suggett, John Marriott
BACKGROUND: A number of methods exist for the risk assessment of hospital inpatients to determine the likelihood of patients experiencing drug-related problems (DRPs), including manual review of a patient's medication (medication reviews) and more complex electronic assessment using decision support alerts in electronic prescribing systems. A systematic review was conducted to determine the evidence base for potential risks associated with adult hospital inpatients that could not only lead to medication-related issues but might also be directly associated with pharmacist intervention...
September 2016: Drugs—Real World Outcomes
Caroline Anne Mitchell, Alice Pitt, Joe Hulin, Rod Lawson, Fleur Ashby, Ivan Appelqvist, Brigitte Delaney
OBJECTIVES: Increased rates of illicit drug inhalation are thought to expose opiate misusers (OMUs) to an enhanced risk of respiratory health problems. This pilot study aimed to determine the feasibility of undertaking respiratory screening of OMUs in a community clinic. SETTING: Single-centre UK community substance misuse clinic. PARTICIPANTS: All clinic attendees receiving treatment for opiate misuse were eligible to participate. 36 participants (mean age=37) were recruited over a 5-week period...
October 14, 2016: BMJ Open
Yi-Sheng Chao, Antoine Boivin, Isabelle Marcoux, Geneviève Garnon, Nicholas Mays, Pascale Lehoux, Marie-Claude Prémont, Evert van Leeuwen, Raynald Pineault
BACKGROUND: End-of-life policies are hotly debated in many countries, with international evidence frequently used to support or oppose legal reforms. Existing reviews are limited by their focus on specific practices or selected jurisdictions. The objective is to review international time trends in end-of-life practices. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of empirical studies on medical end-of-life practices, including treatment withdrawal, the use of drugs for symptom management, and the intentional use of lethal drugs...
October 3, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
James Dodington, Pina Violano, Carl R Baum, Kirsten Bechtel
Significant breakthroughs in the field of injury prevention and childhood safety have occurred during the past half-century. For example, the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970 and the institution of child passenger safety laws are responsible for a significant reduction in injuries among children and adolescents. This review will focus on the following three topics because of their significant contribution to pediatric injury morbidity, especially among adolescents, and their promise for further effective prevention research...
September 27, 2016: Pediatric Research
Nihit Kumar, Zachary N Stowe, Xiaotong Han, Michael J Mancino
BACKGROUND: Early adverse life events such as childhood trauma have been linked to development of substance use disorders. The prevalence and impact on treatment of early childhood trauma in opioid-dependent individuals has received limited research attention. The present study examined reported childhood trauma and its relation to retention and adherence in an outpatient buprenorphine treatment program. METHODS: Medical records of individuals who completed childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) were reviewed to extract baseline data and demographics (N = 113)...
October 2016: American Journal on Addictions
Liam J Nestor, Anna Murphy, John McGonigle, Csaba Orban, Laurence Reed, Eleanor Taylor, Remy Flechais, Louise M Paterson, Dana Smith, Edward T Bullmore, Karen D Ersche, John Suckling, Roger Tait, Rebecca Elliott, Bill Deakin, Ilan Rabiner, Anne Lingford-Hughes, David J Nutt, Barbara Sahakian, Trevor W Robbins
There is a concerted research effort to investigate brain mechanisms underlying addiction processes that may predicate the development of new compounds for treating addiction. One target is the brain's opioid system, because of its role in the reinforcing effects of substances of abuse. Substance-dependent populations have increased numbers of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) in fronto-striatal regions that predict drug relapse, and demonstrate disturbances in these regions during the processing of non-drug rewards...
September 6, 2016: Addiction Biology
Jeffrey M Galecki, Martin F Sherman, Jason M Prenoveau, Kitty S Chan
The present study extends the item-level psychometric information of the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ; Raistrick et al., 1994) that has been purported to measure psychological dependence and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-10th edition substance dependence criteria. Prior research on the LDQ has not established item-level properties or the degree of differential item functioning (DIF) by gender and substance type. Principal component and Mokken scale analyses were used to assess unidimensionality and monotonicity of the responses to the scale items, respectively...
September 2016: Psychological Assessment
Daniel Nicoara, Yangmiao Zhang, Jordan T Nelson, Abigail L Brewer, Prianka Maharaj, Shea N DeWald, Donald Y Shirachi, Raymond M Quock
Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy reportedly reduces opiate withdrawal in human subjects. The purpose of this research was to determine whether HBO2 treatment could suppress physical signs of withdrawal in opiate-dependent mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were injected s.c. with morphine sulfate twice a day for 4 days, the daily dose gradually increasing from 50mg/kg on day 1 to 125mg/kg on day 4. On day 5, withdrawal was precipitated by i.p. injection of 5.0mg/kg naloxone. Mice were observed for physical withdrawal signs, including jumping, forepaw tremor, wet-dog shakes, rearing and defecation for 30min...
October 1, 2016: Brain Research
A Behrens, C Ell
INTRODUCTION: Administering sedation is an established standard in gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly in situations in which sedation is used to make the examination more comfortable for the patient (e. g., during preventive check-up examinations). It is important to have precise information about the risk of sedation-associated complications. AIMS AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to record the incidence and type of sedation-associated complications in a low-risk group of patients (ASA 1 or 2) undergoing elective diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy...
August 2016: Zeitschrift Für Gastroenterologie
Mohammad R Islam, Li Yang, Yeon Sun Lee, Victor J Hruby, Vardan T Karamyan, Thomas J Abbruscato
BACKGROUND: Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world and effective neuroprotectants are yet to be developed. Recent studies have demonstrated excellent neuroprotective effects of a bivalent enkephalin opioid agonist, biphalin in multiple stroke models. METHODS: The purpose of this study is to evaluate novel multifunctional enkephalin-fentanyl opioid agonists, LYS436, LYS739 and LYS416 for their neuroprotective potential using in vitro and in vivo ischemic stroke models and to compare the effect to that of biphalin...
July 20, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Juhwan Kim, Suji Ham, Heeok Hong, Changjong Moon, Heh-In Im
Morphine is the most potent analgesic for chronic pain, but its clinical use has been limited by the opiate's innate tendency to produce tolerance, severe withdrawal symptoms and rewarding properties with a high risk of relapse. To understand the addictive properties of morphine, past studies have focused on relevant molecular and cellular changes in the brain, highlighting the functional roles of reward-related brain regions. Given the accumulated findings, a recent, emerging trend in morphine research is that of examining the dynamics of neuronal interactions in brain reward circuits under the influence of morphine action...
September 2016: Molecules and Cells
I Elias Veizi, Salim M Hayek, Michael Hanes, Ryan Galica, Sivakanth Katta, Tony Yaksh
BACKGROUND: Intrathecal drug delivery therapy has been used effectively in treating patients with intractable chronic pain. The development of an intrathecal catheter tip granuloma (ICTG) related to delivery of intrathecal opiates is a relatively infrequent, but potentially devastating complication. While there are many morphine-related ICTG cases described, reports of hydromorphone-related ICTG are limited. In addition, studies suggest a strong correlation between the use of higher doses and concentrations of intrathecal opiates and ICTG formation...
October 2016: Neuromodulation: Journal of the International Neuromodulation Society
Kathleen Charles-Walsh, Daniel J Upton, Robert Hester
BACKGROUND: Drug dependence is characterized by altered reward processing and poor cognitive control, expressed as a preference for immediate rewards and impaired inhibitory control, respectively. To examine the interaction between reward processing (via the presence or absence of reward) and mechanisms of inhibitory control in drug dependence, the current study used the Monetary Incentive Control Task (MICT) to examine whether a group of opiate dependent persons demonstrated greater difficulty exerting control over immediate rewards compared to neutral stimuli...
September 1, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Kevin S Nishida, Thomas Y Park, Bong Hyo Lee, Robert J Ursano, Kwang H Choi
Individuals report a wide range of analgesia to similar doses of opiates, and not all opiate users become addicted. This suggests that there may be certain predispositions that influence one to develop opiate addiction. We investigated the relationship between the individual differences in initial morphine sensitivity and the subsequent development of opiate addiction-like behavior using a hot plate test and an intravenous morphine self-administration (MSA) paradigm in rats. Using a median split of initial morphine antinociception, animals were defined as low antinociception (LA) and high antinociception (HA) groups...
October 15, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Melissa J Maguire, Cerian F Jackson, Anthony G Marson, Sarah J Nolan
BACKGROUND: Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is defined as sudden, unexpected, witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic or non-drowning death of people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus and in whom postmortem examination does not reveal a structural or toxicological cause for death. SUDEP has a reported incidence of 1 to 2 per 1000 patient years and represents the most common epilepsy-related cause of death. The presence and frequency of generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), male sex, early age of seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and polytherapy are all predictors of risk of SUDEP...
July 19, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Lisa E Graves, Suzanne Turner, Maya Nader, Sucheta Sinha
INTRODUCTION: Despite research demonstrating the safety and benefit of breastfeeding in opioid substitution therapy, few women in treatment breastfeed. Understanding the factors contributing to the choices women on opioid substitution therapy make about infant feeding is important. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to better understand and support infant feeding choices and breastfeeding experiences in women on opioid substitution therapy. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted on five databases: (1) Ovid MEDLINE(R) without revisions, (2) Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, (3) EMBASE, (4) CINAHL, and (5) FRANCIS...
2016: Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment
Seena Fazel, Adrian J Hayes, Katrina Bartellas, Massimo Clerici, Robert Trestman
More than 10 million people are imprisoned worldwide, and the prevalence of all investigated mental disorders is higher in prisoners than in the general population. Although the extent to which prison increases the incidence of mental disorders is uncertain, considerable evidence suggests low rates of identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Prisoners are also at increased risk of all-cause mortality, suicide, self-harm, violence, and victimisation, and research has outlined some modifiable risk factors...
September 2016: Lancet Psychiatry
Sharon L Walsh, Shanna Babalonis
While opioids are very effective analgesics for treating acute pain, humans have struggled with opiate addiction for millenia. An opium abuse epidemic in the early 1900's led the US government to develop a systematic research infrastructure and scientific plan to produce new compounds with analgesic properties but without abuse liability. This review describes the techniques that were developed for testing in the human laboratory, including empirically derived outcome measures and required elements for human abuse potential assessment...
June 30, 2016: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
Angela Cirigliano, Orlando Cenciarelli, Andrea Malizia, Carlo Bellecci, Pasquale Gaudio, Michele Lioj, Teresa Rinaldi
In recent years, the publication of the studies on the transmissibility in mammals of the H5N1 influenza virus and synthetic genomes has triggered heated and concerned debate within the community of scientists on biological dual-use research; these papers have raised the awareness that, in some cases, fundamental research could be directed to harmful experiments, with the purpose of developing a weapon that could be used by a bioterrorist. Here is presented an overview regarding the dual-use concept and its related international agreements which underlines the work of the Australia Group (AG) Export Control Regime...
June 20, 2016: Science and Engineering Ethics
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