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Malarone dosage

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26969110/bioavailability-enhancement-of-atovaquone-using-hot-melt-extrusion-technology
#1
Laxman Kate, Vinod Gokarna, Vivek Borhade, Priyanka Prabhu, Vinita Deshpande, Sulabha Pathak, Shobhona Sharma, Vandana Patravale
Emerging parasite resistance and poor oral bioavailability of anti-malarials are the two cardinal issues which hinder the clinical success of malaria chemotherapy. Atovaquone-Proguanil is a WHO approved fixed dose combination used to tackle the problem of emerging resistance. However, Atovaquone is a highly lipophilic drug having poor aqueous solubility (less than 0.2 μg/ml) thus reducing its oral bioavailability. The aim of the present investigation was to explore hot melt extrusion (HME) as a solvent-free technique to enhance solubility and oral bioavailability of Atovaquone and to develop an oral dosage form for Atovaquone-Proguanil combination...
April 30, 2016: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22551095/early-treatment-failure-during-treatment-of-plasmodium-falciparum-malaria-with-atovaquone-proguanil-in-the-republic-of-ivory-coast
#2
Nathalie Wurtz, Aurélie Pascual, Adeline Marin-Jauffre, Housem Bouchiba, Nicolas Benoit, Marc Desbordes, Maryse Martelloni, Vincent Pommier de Santi, Georges Richa, Nicolas Taudon, Bruno Pradines, Sébastien Briolant
The increased spread of drug-resistant malaria highlights the need for alternative drugs for treatment and chemoprophylaxis. The combination of atovaquone-proguanil (Malarone®) has shown high efficacy against Plasmodium falciparum with only mild side-effects. Treatment failures have been attributed to suboptimal dosages or to parasite resistance resulting from a point mutation in the cytochrome b gene. In this paper, a case of early treatment failure was reported in a patient treated with atovaquone-proguanil; this failure was not associated with a mutation in the parasite cytochrome b gene, with impaired drug bioavailability, or with re-infection...
2012: Malaria Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17215045/uk-malaria-treatment-guidelines
#3
David G Lalloo, Delane Shingadia, Geoffrey Pasvol, Peter L Chiodini, Christopher J Whitty, Nicholas J Beeching, David R Hill, David A Warrell, Barbara A Bannister
Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1500-2000 cases reported each year, and 10-20 deaths. Approximately three-quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other two species of Plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale or Plasmodium malariae...
February 2007: Journal of Infection
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