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"Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms"

Sophie Gohy, Antoine Froidure, Patrick Lebecque
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and severe side-effect, mainly described after intake of anticonvulsants, allopurinol, or antibiotics. It usually begins within 2 months after drug introduction. Symptoms include cutaneous rash, hematologic abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and the diagnosis might be challenging. This case report illustrates for the first time this life-threatening complication in a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this case, withdrawal of the offending drug was sufficient for full recovery...
October 14, 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
A B Likitesh, B N Ragahavendra Prasad, Prasanna
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Abhish Bhujbal, V A Chiddarawar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Sergio Álvarez, Ignacio Delama, Lucas Navajas-Galimany, Gonzalo Eymin, M Elena Ceballos, Romina Andino-Navarrete
DRESS syndrome (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an adverse life-threatening drug reaction characterized by a polymorphous rash associated with fever, lymphadenopathy and multiorgan involvement with eosinophilia. We present the case of an immunocompetent man with DRESS syndrome secondary to carbamazepine, that developed concomitantly meningoencephalitis caused by human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6), and a review of literature. The pathogenic role of HHV-6 in DRESS syndrome remains controversial...
June 2016: Revista Chilena de Infectología: órgano Oficial de la Sociedad Chilena de Infectología
Daisuke Miyazu, Nobuhiro Kodama, Daiki Yamashita, Hirokazu Tanaka, Sachiko Inoue, Osamu Imakyure, Masaaki Hirakawa, Hideki Shuto, Yasufumi Kataoka
BACKGROUND Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life-threatening syndrome comprising severe skin eruption, fever, eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy, and involvement of internal organs. Here, we describe a case of DRESS syndrome caused by cross-reactivity between vancomycin and subsequent teicoplanin administration. CASE REPORT A 79-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of injuries incurred in a traffic accident. Eosinophilia and lung dysfunction appeared after vancomycin administration...
2016: American Journal of Case Reports
Philip Simon Webb, Abdallah Al-Mohammad
A man aged 73 years with infective endocarditis presented with septic shock and was started on immediate antimicrobial therapy. His blood culture yielded no organism. Subsequently, he developed a severe allergic reaction to prolonged empirical vancomycin therapy. This manifested as fever, widespread maculopapular rash and severe progressive acute kidney injury ultimately requiring dialysis. In the context of eosinophilia, this was determined to be drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome...
August 29, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Corinne Maiolo, Christopher Ross, Jan Ibbetson, Daniel Kearney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: JAAD Case Reports
Wiparat Manuyakorn, Surakameth Mahasirimongkol, Plernpit Likkasittipan, Wasu Kamchaisatian, Sukanya Wattanapokayakit, Wimala Inunchot, Anannit Visudtibhan, Nuanjun Wichukchinda, Suwat Benjaponpitak
OBJECTIVE: Phenobarbital hypersensitivity is one of the common drug hypersensitivity syndromes in children. Clinical symptoms of phenobarbital hypersensitivity vary from maculopapular rashes (MPs) to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) including drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Drug hypersensitivity has been demonstrated to be associated with variations in the HLA genotypes...
October 2016: Epilepsia
Elena Ramírez, Nicolás Medrano-Casique, Hoi Y Tong, Teresa Bellón, Rosario Cabañas, Ana Fiandor, Jessica González-Ramos, Pedro Herranz, Elena Trigo, Mario Muñoz, Alberto M Borobia, Antonio J Carcas, Jesús Frías
AIM: We conducted a prospective evaluation of all eosinophilic drug reactions (EDRs) through the Prospective Pharmacovigilance Program from Laboratory Signals at Hospital to find out the incidence and distribution of these entities in our hospital, their causative drugs, and predictors. METHODS: All peripheral eosinophilia >700 × 10(6)  cells l(-1) detected at admission or during hospitalisation, were prospectively monitored over 42 months. The spectrum of the localised or systemic manifestation of EDR, the incidence, the distribution of causative drugs, and the predictors were analysed...
August 20, 2016: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Choong Yi Fong, Nurmaira Hashim, Chin Seng Gan, Tak Kuan Chow, Chee Geap Tay
BACKGROUND: Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) predominantly aromatic AEDs are commonly reported in DRESS. To date there are no reports of sulthiame AED causing DRESS syndrome. METHOD: We report a 10-year-old girl of Indian descent with AED resistant epilepsy on maintenance sodium valproate and clonazepam. Sulthiame AED was initiated to try to improve her seizure control...
November 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology: EJPN
F Medhioub Kaaniche, R Allela, N Ben Algia, S Cherif, M Attar, I Frikha, M Mnif
BACKGROUND: DRESS (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a rare syndrome triggered by an immunological reaction to certain drugs and which may be life-threatening as a result of the onset of severe organ involvement. It is characterised by a long period from the time of drug therapy to the onset of actual signs. Herein, we report the case of 42-year-old female patient who developed DRESS one month after beginning allopurinol treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A 42-year-old woman was hospitalised for febrile exanthema with facial oedema, polyadenopathy, mononucleosis syndrome, major hypereosinophilia and hepatic cytolysis...
August 11, 2016: Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie
Chonlaphat Sukasem, Thawinee Jantararoungtong, Parnrat Kuntawong, Apichaya Puangpetch, Napatrupron Koomdee, Patompong Satapornpong, Patcharin Supapsophon, Jettanong Klaewsongkram, Ticha Rerkpattanapipat
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition to different types of allopurinol-induced cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR), including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN; SJS-TEN, n = 13), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS, n = 10) and Maculopapular eruption (MPE; n = 7), conferred by HLA-B (*) 58:01 in a Thai population. METHODS: This case-control association study compares 30 patients with allopurinol-induced CADR, allopurinol-tolerant control patients (n = 100), and a Thai general population (n = 1095)...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
A Pinho, I Coutinho, A Gameiro, M Gouveia, M Gonçalo
BACKGROUND: Antibiotics are among the most frequent causes of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR); patch testing may be an important tool in their evaluation and management. We assessed the role of patch testing as a diagnostic tool in non-immediate CADR to antibiotics, and evaluated cross-reactivity among them. METHODS: We reviewed data from all patients with non-immediate CADR attributed to antibiotics, which were patch tested between 2000 and 2014 at our dermatology department...
August 1, 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Jacqueline Martins de Sousa, Heloisa Nascimento, Rubens Belfort
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed...
May 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia
Hyunah Kim, Eun Sook Bang, Seung-Kwan Lim, Jae Myeong Lee
OBJECTIVE: To report a rare case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome caused by antituberculosis (TB) drugs, which progressed to acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) after moxifloxacin treatment. CASE SUMMARY: A 25-year-old female was hospitalized for dyspnea and dizziness. She had a history of TB and experienced rifampin-induced skin rash. She was treated for TB with moxifloxacin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide...
October 2016: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Mark G Kirchhof, Aaron Wong, Jan P Dutz
Importance: Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), also known as drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, is a potentially life-threatening reaction to medications with a mortality rate up to 10%. Standard therapy involves the use of systemic corticosteroids with tapering doses extending up to 9 months after the initial reaction. Alternative treatments for DIHS are needed, especially for patients for whom systemic corticosteroids are contraindicated...
July 20, 2016: JAMA Dermatology
Lior Har-Shai, Ziv Savin, Jenna VanLiere Canzoniero
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ
F Skowron, B Bensaid, B Balme, L Depaepe, J Kanitakis, A Nosbaum, D Maucort-Boulch, F Bérard, M D'Incan, S H Kardaun, J-F Nicolas
BACKGROUND: Cutaneous adverse drug reactions frequently present as a benign maculopapular exanthema (MPE) with a rapid healing. Sometimes systemic signs are present, which could represent a more severe or systemic MPE (sMPE) or even be the initial phase of a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Histopathology associated with MPE, sMPE and DRESS has not been well characterized. OBJECTIVES: To study the cutaneous histopathological changes associated with MPE, sMPE and DRESS...
July 16, 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Marie Weinborn, Annick Barbaud, Francois Truchetet, Philippe Beurey, Lucie Germain, Bernard Cribier
BACKGROUND: Few studies have been published on the histopathology of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR), and most of these lack information on skin allergological tests. The histopathology of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is also seldom described. The purpose of our study was to examine six types of well-documented CADR (maculopapular exanthema, DRESS, fixed drug eruption, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis [TEN], and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis) using histopathology and immunohistochemistry to evaluate the expression of granulysin, a key molecule in TEN...
July 15, 2016: International Journal of Dermatology
Robert J Smith, Markus D Boos, Patrick McMahon
A 9-year-old boy presented with fever, rash, anterior cervical lymphadenopathy, high liver enzymes, atypical lymphocytosis, and eosinophilia (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms [DRESS]). His history was notable for having taken griseofulvin for 3 weeks prior to onset of these findings. He improved after treatment with oral prednisone. We present a rare case of probable DRESS secondary to griseofulvin.
September 2016: Pediatric Dermatology
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