Read by QxMD icon Read

Microglia neurodegenerative

Kristin Politi, Serge Przedborski
A recent study reports that microglia and oligodendrocytes promote motor neuron degeneration by inducing inflammation and necroptosis in a manner dependent on receptor-interacting kinase 1 (RIPK1). These findings could be significant for our understanding of the neurobiology and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Rosario Gajardo-Gómez, Valeria C Labra, Carola J Maturana, Kenji F Shoji, Cristian A Santibañez, Juan C Sáez, Christian Giaume, Juan A Orellana
The mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease are not completely understood and how astrocytes and their gliotransmission contribute to this neurodegenerative disease remains to be fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) induces neuronal death by a mechanism that involves the excitotoxic release of ATP and glutamate associated to astroglial hemichannel opening. We have demonstrated that synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids (CBs) reduce the opening of astrocyte Cx43 hemichannels evoked by activated microglia or inflammatory mediators...
October 19, 2016: Glia
Nynke Oosterhof, Inge R Holtman, Laura E Kuil, Herma C van der Linde, Erik W G M Boddeke, Bart J L Eggen, Tjakko J van Ham
Microglia are brain resident macrophages important for brain development, connectivity, homeostasis and disease. However, it is still largely unclear how microglia functions and their identity are regulated at the molecular level. Although recent transcriptomic studies have identified genes specifically expressed in microglia, the function of most of these genes in microglia is still unknown. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on microglia acutely isolated from healthy and neurodegenerative zebrafish brains...
October 19, 2016: Glia
Neal K Bennett, Rebecca Chmielowski, Dalia S Abdelhamid, Jonathan J Faig, Nicola Francis, Jean Baum, Zhiping P Pang, Kathryn E Uhrich, Prabhas V Moghe
Neuroinflammation, a common neuropathologic feature of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease (PD), is frequently exacerbated by microglial activation. The extracellular protein α-synuclein (ASYN), whose aggregation is characteristic of PD, remains a key therapeutic target, but the control of synuclein trafficking and aggregation within microglia has been challenging. First, we established that microglial internalization of monomeric ASYN was mediated by scavenger receptors (SR), CD36 and SRA1, and was rapidly accompanied by the formation of ASYN oligomers...
December 2016: Biomaterials
Manmeet K Mamik, Eugene L Asahchop, Wing F Chan, Yu Zhu, William G Branton, Brienne A McKenzie, Eric A Cohen, Christopher Power
: HIV-1 infection of the brain causes the neurodegenerative syndrome HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), for which there is no specific treatment. Herein, we investigated the actions of insulin using ex vivo and in vivo models of HAND. Increased neuroinflammatory gene expression was observed in brains from patients with HIV/AIDS. The insulin receptor was detected on both neurons and glia, but its expression was unaffected by HIV-1 infection. Insulin treatment of HIV-infected primary human microglia suppressed supernatant HIV-1 p24 levels, reduced CXCL10 and IL-6 transcript levels, and induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Elodie Martin, Céline Boucher, Bertrand Fontaine, Cécile Delarasse
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, activated microglia, and neuronal cell death leading to progressive dementia. Recent data indicate that microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) are key players in the initiation and progression of AD, yet their respective roles remain to be clarified. As AD occurs mostly in the elderly and aging impairs myeloid functions, we addressed the inflammatory profile of microglia and MDM during aging in TgAPP/PS1 and TgAPP/PS1dE9, two transgenic AD mouse models, compared to WT littermates...
October 8, 2016: Aging Cell
Patrick L McGeer, Joseph Rogers, Edith G McGeer
Two basic discoveries spurred research into inflammation as a driving force in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first was the identification of activated microglia in association with the lesions. The second was the discovery that rheumatoid arthritics, who regularly consume anti-inflammatory agents, were relatively spared from the disease. These findings led to an exploration of the inflammatory pathways that were involved in AD pathogenesis. A pivotal advance was the discovery that amyloid-β protein (Aβ) activated the complement system...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Ashley N Nilson, Kelsey C English, Julia E Gerson, T Barton Whittle, C Nicolas Crain, Judy Xue, Urmi Sengupta, Diana L Castillo-Carranza, Wenbo Zhang, Praveena Gupta, Rakez Kayed
It is well-established that inflammation plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). Inflammation and synapse loss occur in disease prior to the formation of larger aggregates, but the contribution of tau to inflammation has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Tau pathologically aggregates to form large fibrillar structures known as tangles. However, evidence suggests that smaller soluble aggregates, called oligomers, are the most toxic species and form prior to tangles...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Verónica Murta, Carina Ferrari
In recent decades, several neurodegenerative diseases have been shown to be exacerbated by systemic inflammatory processes. There is a wide range of literature that demonstrates a clear but complex relationship between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immunological system, both under naïve or pathological conditions. In diseased brains, peripheral inflammation can transform "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger pathological responses. Demyelinating diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by inflammatory lesions associated with demyelination, which in turn induces axonal damage, neurodegeneration, and progressive loss of function...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Francisca Cornejo, Rommy von Bernhardi
As we age, a large number of physiological and molecular changes affect the normal functioning of cells, tissues, and the organism as a whole. One of the main changes is the establishment of a state of systemic inflammatory activation, which has been termed "inflamm-aging"; a mild chronic inflammation of the aging organism that reduces the ability to generate an efficient response against stressor stimuli. As any other system, the nervous system undergoes these aging-related changes; the neuroinflammatory state depends mainly on the dysregulated activation of microglia, the innate immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and the principal producers of reactive oxygen species...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Rommy von Bernhardi, Florencia Heredia, Nicole Salgado, Paola Muñoz
The activation of microglia has been recognized for over a century by their morphological changes. Long slender microglia acquire a short sturdy ramified shape when activated. During the past 20 years, microglia have been accepted as an essential cellular component for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of many brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. More recently, functional studies and imaging in mouse models indicate that microglia are active in the healthy central nervous system. It has become evident that microglia release several signal molecules that play key roles in the crosstalk among brain cells, i...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Rommy von Bernhardi, Jaime Eugenín-von Bernhardi, Betsi Flores, Jaime Eugenín León
Today, there is enormous progress in understanding the function of glial cells, including astroglia, oligodendroglia, Schwann cells, and microglia. Around 150 years ago, glia were viewed as a glue among neurons. During the course of the twentieth century, microglia were discovered and neuroscientists' views evolved toward considering glia only as auxiliary cells of neurons. However, over the last two to three decades, glial cells' importance has been reconsidered because of the evidence on their involvement in defining central nervous system architecture, brain metabolism, the survival of neurons, development and modulation of synaptic transmission, propagation of nerve impulses, and many other physiological functions...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Hyunjung Baek, Minsook Ye, Geun-Hyung Kang, Chanju Lee, Gihyun Lee, Da Bin Choi, Jaehoon Jung, Hyunseong Kim, Seonhwa Lee, Jin Su Kim, Hyun-Ju Lee, Insop Shim, Jun-Ho Lee, Hyunsu Bae
Alzheimer's disease patients display neuropathological lesions, including the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and neurofibrillary tangles. Although the mechanisms causing the neurodegenerative process are largely unknown, increasing evidence highlights a critical role of immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) on Alzheimer's disease progression. First, we explored the effect of Tregs (CD4+CD25+ T cells) and Teffs (CD4+CD25- T cells) in an adoptive transfer model...
October 4, 2016: Oncotarget
Stefan J Kempf, Dirk Janik, Zarko Barjaktarovic, Ignacia Braga-Tanaka Iii, Satoshi Tanaka, Frauke Neff, Anna Saran, Martin R Larsen, Soile Tapio
Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer´s model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates...
September 30, 2016: Oncotarget
Shunji Nakatake, Yusuke Murakami, Yasuhiro Ikeda, Noriko Morioka, Takashi Tachibana, Kohta Fujiwara, Noriko Yoshida, Shoji Notomi, Toshio Hisatomi, Shigeo Yoshida, Tatsuro Ishibashi, Yusaku Nakabeppu, Koh-Hei Sonoda
Oxidative stress is implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited disease that causes blindness. The biological and cellular mechanisms by which oxidative stress mediates neuronal cell death are largely unknown. In a mouse model of RP (rd10 mice), we show that oxidative DNA damage activates microglia through MutY homolog-mediated (MUYTH-mediated) base excision repair (BER), thereby exacerbating retinal inflammation and degeneration. In the early stage of retinal degeneration, oxidative DNA damage accumulated in the microglia and caused single-strand breaks (SSBs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation...
September 22, 2016: JCI Insight
Yoojin Seo, Hyung-Sik Kim, Insung Kang, Soon Won Choi, Tae-Hoon Shin, Ji-Hee Shin, Byung-Chul Lee, Jin Young Lee, Jae-Jun Kim, Myung Geun Kook, Kyung-Sun Kang
Microglia can aggravate olfactory dysfunction by mediating neuronal death in the olfactory bulb (OB) of a murine model of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder accompanied by lipid trafficking defects. In this study, we focused on the crosstalk between neurons and microglia to elucidate the mechanisms underlying extensive microgliosis in the NPC1-affected brain. Microglia in the OB of NPC1 mice strongly expressed CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (Cx3cr1), a specific receptor for the neural chemokine C-X3-C motif ligand 1 (Cx3cl1)...
September 30, 2016: Glia
X T Li, D F Cai
Parkinson's disease(PD)was the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. Incidence of PD was ascending year by year. The etiology of PD is poorly understood, involving aging, genetic and environmental factors. Recently, environmental compound had attracted more and more research interest. Studies and extrapolation from epidemiology, animal experiments and cell culture suggested that environmental compound had involved in the molecular mechanisms including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, microglia activation, abnormal aggregation of α-synuclein and autophagy damage ,which seemed to increase PD risk...
October 6, 2016: Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine]
Priya Revathikumar, Filip Bergqvist, Srividya Gopalakrishnan, Marina Korotkova, Per-Johan Jakobsson, Jon Lampa, Erwan Le Maître
BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) primarily functions through acetylcholine (ACh)-alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) interaction on macrophages to control peripheral inflammation. Interestingly, ACh can also bind α7nAChRs on microglia resulting in neuroprotective effects. However, ACh effects on astrocytes remain elusive. Here, we investigated the effects of nicotine, an ACh receptor agonist, on the cytokine and cholinesterase production of immunocompetent human astrocytes stimulated with interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in vitro...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Joel Kaye, Victor Piryatinsky, Tal Birnberg, Tal Hingaly, Emanuel Raymond, Rina Kashi, Einat Amit-Romach, Ignacio S Caballero, Fadi Towfic, Mark A Ator, Efrat Rubinstein, Daphna Laifenfeld, Aric Orbach, Doron Shinar, Yael Marantz, Iris Grossman, Volker Knappertz, Michael R Hayden, Ralph Laufer
Laquinimod is an oral drug currently being evaluated for the treatment of relapsing, remitting, and primary progressive multiple sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Laquinimod exerts beneficial activities on both the peripheral immune system and the CNS with distinctive changes in CNS resident cell populations, especially astrocytes and microglia. Analysis of genome-wide expression data revealed activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in laquinimod-treated mice. The AhR pathway modulates the differentiation and function of several cell populations, many of which play an important role in neuroinflammation...
October 11, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Teng Jiang, Ying-Dong Zhang, Qing Gao, Jun-Shan Zhou, Xi-Chen Zhu, Huan Lu, Jian-Quan Shi, Lan Tan, Qi Chen, Jin-Tai Yu
As the most common type of neurodegenerative disease, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) within the brain. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) 1 is an immune receptor expressed by mononuclear phagocytes including monocytes and microglia, coupling with TYRO protein tyrosine kinase binding protein to regulate immune reactions. Emerging evidence indicates that rs6910730(G), an intronic variant of TREM1, is associated with an increased Aβ neuropathology in the brains of elderly subjects, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear...
November 2016: Acta Neuropathologica
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"