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atypical Hemolytic

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110418/occurrence-of-atypical-hus-associated-with-influenza-b
#1
Karen van Hoeve, Corinne Vandermeulen, Marc Van Ranst, Elena Levtchenko, Lambert van den Heuvel, Djalila Mekahli
: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy with a triad of non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Approximately 10% of cases of HUS are classified as atypical (aHUS). While today many genetically forms of aHUS pathology are known, only about 50% of carriers precipitate the disease. The reason remains unclear, and triggering events like intercurrent infections have been postulated. In rare cases, influenza A is the known trigger of aHUS; however, no cases of influenza B have been reported...
January 21, 2017: European Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104134/eculizumab-and-belatacept-for-de-novo-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-associated-with-cfhr3-cfhr1-deletion-in-a-kidney-transplant-recipient-a-case-report
#2
P Dedhia, A Govil, G Mogilishetty, R R Alloway, E S Woodle, B G Abu Jawdeh
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and occurs due to genetic or acquired abnormalities that result in the dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. CASE REPORT: We report a case of post-living kidney transplantation de novo aHUS in a setting of heterozygous deletion in the complement factor H-related protein (CFHR)3-CFHR1 gene. The aHUS episode was possibly triggered by antibody-mediated rejection or tacrolimus...
January 2017: Transplantation Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104125/efficacy-of-eculizumab-therapy-for-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-recurrence-and-antibody-mediated-rejection-progress-after-renal-transplantation-with-preformed-donor-specific-antibodies-case-report
#3
T Yamamoto, Y Watarai, K Futamura, M Okada, M Tsujita, T Hiramitsu, N Goto, S Narumi, A Takeda, T Kobayashi
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develops as the result of unregulated complement progression and precipitates de novo thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma therapy is used to control the progression of the complement cascade, but that therapy is not effective in all patients and is accompanied by risk of infection and/or allergy. Eculizumab has been reported as an efficient therapy for aHUS. We report the case of a 35-year old woman who underwent effective eculizumab therapy for aHUS recurrence and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) progress after renal transplantation with preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSA)...
January 2017: Transplantation Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28101502/pregnant-woman-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-delivered-a-healthy-newborn-under-eculizumab-treatment
#4
Erol Demir, Halil Yazici, Yasemin Ozluk, Isin Kilicaslan, Aydin Turkmen
Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathy is a very rare condition; however, it significantly increases fetal or maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy may trigger atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The risk for pregnancy-associated aHUS is highest during the second pregnancy. The outcome is usually poor with 50-60% mortality; renal dysfunction and hypertension are the rule in those who survive the acute episode. After the development of complement regulation mechanisms and aHUS pathogenesis, eculizumab has been widely used as a first-line treatment in aHUS...
September 2016: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28101432/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-first-trimester-pregnancy-successfully-treated-with-eculizumab
#5
Gabriela Andries, Michael Karass, Srikanth Yandrapalli, Katherine Linder, Delong Liu, John Nelson, Rahul Pawar, Savneek Chugh
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare disorder which is known to cause acute thrombotic microangiopathy during pregnancy with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is caused mostly by dysregulation of alternative complement pathway secondary to genetic mutations. Most of the cases reported have been in the post-partum period. We report a rare case of a patient who presents with thrombotic microangiopathy in the first trimester of her eleventh pregnancy and was successfully treated with eculizumab...
2017: Experimental Hematology & Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28099134/carboxyhemoglobin-the-forgotten-parameter-of-neonatal-hyperbilirubinemia
#6
Douggl G N Bailey, Hans Fuchs, Roland Hentschel
BACKGROUND: Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is influenced by a wide variety of factors, one of which is hemolysis. Serious hyperbilirubinemia may lead to a kernicterus with detrimental neurologic sequelae. Patients suffering from hemolytic disease have a higher risk of developing kernicterus. Carbon monoxide (CO), a byproduct of hemolysis or heme degradation, was described by Sjöstrand in the 1960s. It is transported as carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and exhaled through the lungs. We were interested in a potential correlation between COHb and total serum bilirubin (TSB) and the time course of both parameters...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Perinatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058212/complement-related-kidney-diseases-recurrence-after-transplantation
#7
REVIEW
Maurizio Salvadori, Elisabetta Bertoni
The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement...
December 24, 2016: World Journal of Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057640/murine-systemic-thrombophilia-and-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-from-a-factor-h-point-mutation
#8
Yoshiyasu Ueda, Imran Mohammed, Delu Song, Damodar Gullipalli, Lin Zhou, Sayaka Sato, Yuan Wang, Shuchi Gupta, Zhongjian Cheng, Hong Wang, Jialing Bao, Yingying Mao, Lawrence Brass, X Long Zheng, Takashi Miwa, Matthew Palmer, Joshua Dunaief, Wen-Chao Song
Complement plays a key role in host defense but its dysregulation can cause autologous tissue injury. Complement activation is normally controlled by regulatory proteins including factor H (FH) in plasma and membrane cofactor protein (MCP) on the cell surface. Mutations in FH and MCP are linked to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that causes renal failure in patients. We describe here that disruption of FH function on the cell surface can also lead to disseminated complement-dependent macrovascular thrombosis...
January 5, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056875/turkish-pediatric-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-registry-initial-analysis-of-146-patients
#9
Nesrin Besbas, Bora Gulhan, Oguz Soylemezoglu, Z Birsin Ozcakar, Emine Korkmaz, Mutlu Hayran, Fatih Ozaltin
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a devastating disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Its genetic heterogeneity impacts its clinical presentation, progress, and outcome, and there is no consensus on its clinical management. METHODS: To identify the characteristics of aHUS in Turkish children, an industry-independent registry was established for data collection that includes both retrospective and prospective patients. RESULTS: In total, 146 patients (62 boys, 84 girls) were enrolled; 53 patients (36...
January 5, 2017: BMC Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025630/adjustment-of-eculizumab-dosage-pattern-in-patients-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-with-suboptimal-response-to-standard-treatment-pattern
#10
Camino García Monteavaro, Carmen Peralta Roselló, Borja Quiroga, José María Baltar Martín, Lorena Castillo Eraso, Fernando de Álvaro Moreno, Alberto Martínez Vea, María Teresa Visus-Fernández de Manzanos
In patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), complement blocking by eculizumab rapidly halts the process of thrombotic microangiopathy and it is associated with clear long-term hematologic and renal improvements. Eculizumab treatment consists of a 4-week initial phase with weekly IV administration of 900 mg doses, followed by a maintenance phase with a 1,200 mg dose in the fifth week and every 14 ± 2 days thereafter. We present three patients with aHUS and suboptimal response to eculizumab treatment at the usual administration dosage who showed hematologic and renal improvements after an adjustment in the eculizumab treatment protocol...
2016: Case Reports in Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989322/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-and-c3-glomerulopathy-conclusions-from-a-kidney-disease-improving-global-outcomes-kdigo-controversies-conference
#11
Timothy H J Goodship, H Terence Cook, Fadi Fakhouri, Fernando C Fervenza, Véronique Frémeaux-Bacchi, David Kavanagh, Carla M Nester, Marina Noris, Matthew C Pickering, Santiago Rodríguez de Córdoba, Lubka T Roumenina, Sanjeev Sethi, Richard J H Smith
In both atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) complement plays a primary role in disease pathogenesis. Herein we report the outcome of a 2015 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference where key issues in the management of these 2 diseases were considered by a global panel of experts. Areas addressed included renal pathology, clinical phenotype and assessment, genetic drivers of disease, acquired drivers of disease, and treatment strategies. In order to help guide clinicians who are caring for such patients, recommendations for best treatment strategies were discussed at length, providing the evidence base underpinning current treatment options...
December 15, 2016: Kidney International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986662/a-pathogenic-role-of-complement-in-arterial-hypertension-and-hypertensive-end-organ-damage
#12
Ulrich O Wenzel, Marlies Bode, Jörg Köhl, Heimo Ehmke
The self-amplifying cascade of messenger and effector molecules of the complement system serves as a powerful danger sensing system that protects the host from a hostile microbial environment, while maintaining proper tissue and organ function through effective clearance of altered or dying cells. As an important effector arm of innate immunity it plays also important roles in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Innate and adaptive immune response have been identified as crucial players in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage...
December 16, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27977428/breaking-down-the-complement-system-a-review-and-update-on-novel-therapies
#13
Yuvaram N V Reddy, Andrew M Siedlecki, Jean M Francis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The complement system represents one of the more primitive forms of innate immunity. It has increasingly been found to contribute to pathologies in the native and transplanted kidney. We provide a concise review of the physiology of the complement cascade, and discuss current and upcoming complement-based therapies. RECENT FINDINGS: Current agents in clinical use either bind to complement components directly or prevent complement from binding to antibodies affixed to the endothelial surface...
December 12, 2016: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976568/an-unexpected-diagnostic-course-of-systemic-lupus-erythematosus
#14
Aysel Taktak, Adem Köksoy, Özge Başaran, Saba Kiremitçi, Banu Acar, Nermin Uncu, Nilgün Çakar
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TM), especially thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as a severe hematological involvement. However hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is seen less frequently in SLE, particularly as an initial presentation. Here we present a 15-year old boy presenting with gross hematuria, decreased urinary output and petechial lesions. He was diagnosed as atypical HUS according to the classical triad of TM, along with observation of hypocomplementemia and negative stool cultures...
2016: Turkish Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974740/a-case-report-and-literature-review-of-eculizumab-withdrawal-in-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#15
Borja Quiroga, Alberto de Lorenzo, Cristina Vega, Fernando de Alvaro
BACKGROUND Recent advances in the treatment of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) have resulted to better long-term survival rates for patients with this life-threatening disease. However, many questions remain such as whether or not long-term treatment is necessary in some patients and what are the risks of prolonged therapy. CASE REPORT Here, we discuss the case of a 37-year-old woman with CFH and CD46 genetic abnormalities who developed aHUS with severe renal failure. She was successfully treated with three doses of rituximab and a three month treatment with eculizumab...
December 15, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974406/thrombotic-microangiopathy-in-inverted-formin-2-mediated-renal-disease
#16
Rachel C Challis, Troels Ring, Yaobo Xu, Edwin K S Wong, Oliver Flossmann, Ian S D Roberts, Saeed Ahmed, Michael Wetherall, Giedrius Salkus, Vicky Brocklebank, Julian Fester, Lisa Strain, Valerie Wilson, Katrina M Wood, Kevin J Marchbank, Mauro Santibanez-Koref, Timothy H J Goodship, David Kavanagh
The demonstration of impaired C regulation in the thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) resulted in the successful introduction of the C inhibitor eculizumab into clinical practice. C abnormalities account for approximately 50% of aHUS cases; however, mutations in the non-C gene diacylglycerol kinase-ε have been described recently in individuals not responsive to eculizumab. We report here a family in which the proposita presented with aHUS but did not respond to eculizumab...
December 14, 2016: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27965669/complement-regulator-fhr-3-is-elevated-either-locally-or-systemically-in-a-selection-of-autoimmune-diseases
#17
Nicole Schäfer, Antje Grosche, Joerg Reinders, Stefanie M Hauck, Richard B Pouw, Taco W Kuijpers, Diana Wouters, Boris Ehrenstein, Volker Enzmann, Peter F Zipfel, Christine Skerka, Diana Pauly
The human complement factor H-related protein-3 (FHR-3) is a soluble regulator of the complement system. Homozygous cfhr3/1 deletion is a genetic risk factor for the autoimmune form of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS), while also found to be protective in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The precise function of FHR-3 remains to be fully characterized. We generated four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for FHR-3 (RETC) without cross-reactivity to the complement factor H (FH)-family. These antibodies detected FHR-3 from human serum with a mean concentration of 1 μg/mL...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959629/complement-dysregulation-and-disease-insights-from-contemporary-genetics
#18
M Kathryn Liszewski, Anuja Java, Elizabeth C Schramm, John P Atkinson
The vertebrate complement system consists of sequentially interacting proteins that provide for a rapid and powerful host defense. Nearly 60 proteins comprise three activation pathways (classical, alternative, and lectin) and a terminal cytolytic pathway common to all. Attesting to its potency, nearly half of the system's components are engaged in its regulation. An emerging theme over the past decade is that variations in these inhibitors predispose to two scourges of modern humans. One, occurring most often in childhood, is a rare but deadly thrombomicroangiopathy called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome...
December 5, 2016: Annual Review of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27951532/brief-review-and-a-clinical-case-of-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-associated-with-interferon-%C3%AE-treatment
#19
Sabrina Milan Manani, Grazia Maria Virzì, Fiorella Gastaldon, Marta Proglio, Alessandra Brocca, Claudio Ronco
The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathies and it consists of the triad of nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. The atypical form of HUS (aHUS) is related to causative mutations in complement genes. Some conditions act as a trigger for aHUS in individuals that have a genetic background predisposing to complement activation. Interferon β is a recombinant-protein therapy approved to treat multiple sclerosis (MS), and can be a causative agent in the occurrence of HUS through anti-angiogenic activity...
December 13, 2016: Blood Purification
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932477/moss-produced-glycosylation-optimized-human-factor-h-for-therapeutic-application-in-complement-disorders
#20
Stefan Michelfelder, Juliana Parsons, Lennard L Bohlender, Sebastian N W Hoernstein, Holger Niederkrüger, Andreas Busch, Nicola Krieghoff, Jonas Koch, Benjamin Fode, Andreas Schaaf, Thomas Frischmuth, Martin Pohl, Peter F Zipfel, Ralf Reski, Eva L Decker, Karsten Häffner
Genetic defects in complement regulatory proteins can lead to severe renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathies, and age-related macular degeneration. The majority of the mutations found in patients with these diseases affect the glycoprotein complement factor H, the main regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Therapeutic options are limited, and novel treatments, specifically those targeting alternative pathway activation, are highly desirable...
December 8, 2016: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
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