keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Ago protein

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29241411/prediction-of-zinc-binding-sites-in-proteins-using-sequence-derived-information
#1
Abhishikha Srivastava, Manish Kumar
Zinc is one the most abundant catalytic cofactor and also an important structural component of a large number of metallo-proteins. Hence prediction of zinc metal binding sites in proteins can be a significant step in annotation of molecular function of a large number of proteins. Majority of existing methods for zinc-binding site predictions are based on a dataset of proteins, which has been compiled nearly a decade ago. Hence there is a need to develop zinc-binding site prediction system using the current updated data to include recently added proteins...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Biomolecular Structure & Dynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240875/the-expanding-roles-of-argonautes-rna-interference-splicing-and-beyond
#2
Xiaoxia Ma, Ziwei Zuo, Weishan Shao, Yongfeng Jin, Yijun Meng
Argonaute (AGO) protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, reflecting its evolutionarily indispensible role in maintaining normal life cycle of the organisms. Small RNA-guided, AGO-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) is a well-studied pathway for gene expression regulation, which can be performed at transcriptional, posttranscriptional or translational level. In addition to RNAi, growing pieces of evidence point to a novel role of AGOs in pre-mRNA (messenger RNA precursor) splicing in animals...
December 11, 2017: Briefings in Functional Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29238174/human-polyomaviruses-the-battle-of-large-and-small-tumor-antigens
#3
REVIEW
Camila Freze Baez, Rafael Brandão Varella, Sonia Villani, Serena Delbue
About 40 years ago, the large and small tumor antigens (LT-Ag and sT-Ag) of the polyomavirus (PyVs) simian vacuolating virus 40 have been identified and characterized. To date, it is well known that all the discovered human PyVs (HPyVs) encode these 2 multifunctional and tumorigenic proteins, expressed at viral replication early stage. The 2 T-Ags are able to transform cells both in vitro and in vivo and seem to play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of some tumors in humans. In addition, they are involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and virion assembly...
2017: Virology: Research and Treatment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29236255/identifying-mirna-targets-using-ago-ripseq
#4
Rebecca Petri, Johan Jakobsson
microRNAs (miRNA) are small, noncoding RNAs that bind to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and regulate their activity. They are, therefore, important posttranscriptional regulators. In recent years it has become clear that miRNAs regulate large genetic networks, rather than single genes, and that one gene can be targeted by several miRNAs. To understand the role of miRNAs in cells or tissues, it is therefore important to analyze the targetome of miRNAs. Here, we present a technique called Argonaute-RNA Immunoprecipitation (AGO-RIP) which takes advantages of the fact that miRNAs and their targets are directly bound by the Argonaute protein family...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233876/molecular-control-of-chaperone-mediated-autophagy
#5
REVIEW
Steve Catarino, Paulo Pereira, Henrique Girão
Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective form of autophagy in which cytosolic proteins bearing a pentapeptide motif biochemically related to the KFERQ sequence, are recognized by the heat shock protein family A member 8 (HSPA8) chaperone, delivered to the lysomal membrane, and directly translocated across the lysosomal membrane by a protein complex containing lysosomal associated membrane protein 2a (Lamp2a). Since its discovery over two decades ago, the importance of this pathway in cell proteostasis has been made increasingly apparent...
December 12, 2017: Essays in Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233219/a-molecular-engineering-toolbox-for-the-structural-biologist
#6
Galia T Debelouchina, Tom W Muir
Exciting new technological developments have pushed the boundaries of structural biology, and have enabled studies of biological macromolecules and assemblies that would have been unthinkable not long ago. Yet, the enhanced capabilities of structural biologists to pry into the complex molecular world have also placed new demands on the abilities of protein engineers to reproduce this complexity into the test tube. With this challenge in mind, we review the contents of the modern molecular engineering toolbox that allow the manipulation of proteins in a site-specific and chemically well-defined fashion...
January 2017: Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233216/nucleic-acids-function-and-potential-for-abiogenesis
#7
Falk Wachowius, James Attwater, Philipp Holliger
The emergence of functional cooperation between the three main classes of biomolecules - nucleic acids, peptides and lipids - defines life at the molecular level. However, how such mutually interdependent molecular systems emerged from prebiotic chemistry remains a mystery. A key hypothesis, formulated by Crick, Orgel and Woese over 40 year ago, posits that early life must have been simpler. Specifically, it proposed that an early primordial biology lacked proteins and DNA but instead relied on RNA as the key biopolymer responsible not just for genetic information storage and propagation, but also for catalysis, i...
January 2017: Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29228832/nadph-oxidase-4-mediates-ros-production-in-radiation-induced-senescent-cells-and-promotes-migration-of-inflammatory-cells
#8
Yuri Sakai, Tohru Yamamori, Yoji Yoshikawa, Tomoki Bo, Motofumi Suzuki, Kumiko Yamamoto, Tetsuro Ago, Osamu Inanami
Excessive DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) to normal tissue cells is known to trigger cellular senescence, a process termed stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). SIPS is often accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this is reported to be important for the initiation and maintenance of SIPS. However, the source of ROS during SIPS after IR and their significance in radiation-induced normal tissue damage remain elusive. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of proteins mediates ROS production in SIPS-induced cells after IR and plays a role in SIPS-associated biological events...
December 12, 2017: Free Radical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29228598/analysis-of-molecular-evolution-of-nucleocapsid-protein-in-newcastle-disease-virus
#9
Wentao Fan, Yuliang Xu, Pu Zhang, Peng Chen, Yiran Zhu, Ziqiang Cheng, Xiaona Zhao, Yongxia Liu, Jianzhu Liu
The present study investigated the molecular evolution of nucleocapsid protein (NP) in different Newcastle disease virus (NDV) genotypes. The evolutionary timescale and rate were estimated using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The p-distance, Bayesian skyline plot (BSP), and positively selected sites were also analyzed. The MCMC tree indicated that NDV diverged about 250 years ago with a rapid evolution rate (1.059 × 10-2 substitutions/site/year) and that different NDV genotypes formed three lineages...
November 14, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29225577/if-channel-as-an-emerging-therapeutic-target-for-cardiovascular-diseases-a-review-of-current-evidence-and-controversies
#10
REVIEW
Hayelom G Mengesha, Tadesse B Tafesse, Mohammed H Bule
In 2015, non-communicable diseases accounted for 39.5 million (70%) of the total 56.4 million deaths that occurred globally, of which 17.7 million (45%) were due to cardiovascular diseases. An elevated heart rate is considered to be one of the independent predictors and markers of future cardiovascular diseases. A variety of experimental and epidemiological studies have found that atherosclerosis, heart failure, coronary artery disease, stroke, and arrhythmia are linked to elevated heart rate. Although there are established drugs to reduce the heart rate, these drugs have undesirable side effects...
2017: Frontiers in Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220102/identification-of-a-62-kda-major-allergen-from-artemisia-pollen-as-a-putative-galactose-oxidase
#11
Wanyi Fu, Zhongshan Gao, Ling Gao, Jing Jin, Meiling Liu, Yuemei Sun, Shandong Wu, Lingying Wu, Hongshan Ma, Yimin Dong, Xuefeng Wang, Biyuan Gao, Huiying Wang, Jaap H Akkerdaas, Serge A Versteeg, Ronald van Ree
BACKGROUND: Around 20 years ago, a 60-70 kDa protein was reported as a major allergen of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) pollen. This study was to identify and characterize its molecular properties. METHODS: Sera from 113 Chinese and 20 Dutch Artemisia allergic/sensitized subjects (and pools thereof) were used to identify the 60-70 kDa allergen. Pollen extracts of seven Artemisia species were compared by immunoblotting. Transcriptomics and proteomics (mass spectrometry) of A...
December 8, 2017: Allergy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29213026/-case-of-protein-plug-in-the-pancreatic-duct-mimicking-pancreatic-cancer-concomitant-with-branch-type-intraductal-papillary-mucinous-neoplasm
#12
Ken Ichikawa, Kana Hattori, Tomoki Kusafuka, Takao Omori, Yasuo Ohkura, Takashi Hamada, Hiroki Taoka, Hiroki Tanaka, Shimpei Matsusaki, Youichirou Baba
A 65-year-old male was referred to our hospital 2 years ago for a multilocular cyst accompanied with a protein plug in the pancreas tail. He was diagnosed as having branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and was followed-up. Two years later, endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion, 10mm in diameter, near the cyst-like lesion. Finally, he was diagnosed with small pancreatic adenocarcinoma concomitant with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and underwent radical distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy...
2017: Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi, the Japanese Journal of Gastro-enterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29212301/convergence-of-cancer-metabolism-and-immunity-an-overview
#13
REVIEW
Chi Van Dang, Jung-Whan Kim
Cancer metabolism as a field of research was founded almost 100 years ago by Otto Warburg, who described the propensity for cancers to convert glucose to lactate despite the presence of oxygen, which in yeast diminishes glycolytic metabolism known as the Pasteur effect. In the past 20 years, the resurgence of interest in cancer metabolism provided significant insights into processes involved in maintenance metabolism of non-proliferating cells and proliferative metabolism, which is regulated by proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors in normal proliferating cells...
December 7, 2017: Biomolecules & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29208248/kidney-diseases-associated-with-alternative-complement-pathway-dysregulation-and-potential-treatment-options
#14
REVIEW
Prateek Sanghera, Mythili Ghanta, Fatih Ozay, Venkatesh K Ariyamuthu, Bekir Tanriover
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy (dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulonephritis) are characterized as inappropriate activation of the alternative complement pathway. Genetic mutations affecting the alternative complement pathway regulating proteins (complement factor H, I, membrane cofactor protein and complement factor H-related proteins) and triggers (such as infection, surgery, pregnancy and autoimmune disease flares) result in the clinical manifestation of these diseases. A decade ago, prognosis of these disease states was quite poor, with most patients developing end-stage renal disease...
December 2017: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196697/de-novo-transcriptome-assembly-of-zanthoxylum-bungeanum-using-illumina-sequencing-for-evolutionary-analysis-and-simple-sequence-repeat-marker-development
#15
Shijing Feng, Lili Zhao, Zhenshan Liu, Yulin Liu, Tuxi Yang, Anzhi Wei
Zanthoxylum, an ancient economic crop in Asia, has a satisfying aromatic taste and immense medicinal values. A lack of genomic information and genetic markers has limited the evolutionary analysis and genetic improvement of Zanthoxylum species and their close relatives. To better understand the evolution, domestication, and divergence of Zanthoxylum, we present a de novo transcriptome analysis of an elite cultivar of Z. bungeanum using Illumina sequencing; we then developed simple sequence repeat markers for identification of Zanthoxylum...
December 1, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29192260/antisense-oligonucleotides-the-next-frontier-for-treatment-of-neurological-disorders
#16
REVIEW
Carlo Rinaldi, Matthew J A Wood
Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were first discovered to influence RNA processing and modulate protein expression over two decades ago; however, progress translating these agents into the clinic has been hampered by inadequate target engagement, insufficient biological activity, and off-target toxic effects. Over the years, novel chemical modifications of ASOs have been employed to address these issues. These modifications, in combination with elucidation of the mechanism of action of ASOs and improved clinical trial design, have provided momentum for the translation of ASO-based strategies into therapies...
December 1, 2017: Nature Reviews. Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29187252/atypical-non-standard-functions-of-the-microtubule-associated-tau-protein
#17
REVIEW
Ioannis Sotiropoulos, Marie-Christine Galas, Joana M Silva, Efthimios Skoulakis, Susanne Wegmann, Mahmoud Bukar Maina, David Blum, Carmen Laura Sayas, Eva-Maria Mandelkow, Eckhard Mandelkow, Maria Grazia Spillantini, Nuno Sousa, Jesus Avila, Miguel Medina, Amrit Mudher, Luc Buee
Since the discovery of the microtubule-associated protein Tau (MAPT) over 40 years ago, most studies have focused on Tau's role in microtubule stability and regulation, as well as on the neuropathological consequences of Tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In recent years, however, research efforts identified new interaction partners and different sub-cellular localizations for Tau suggesting additional roles beyond its standard function as microtubule regulating protein...
November 29, 2017: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29186539/reconstitution-of-the-cstf-complex-unveils-a-regulatory-role-for-cstf-50-in-recognition-of-3-end-processing-signals
#18
Wen Yang, Peter L Hsu, Fan Yang, Jae-Eun Song, Gabriele Varani
Cleavage stimulation factor (CstF) is a highly conserved protein complex composed of three subunits that recognizes G/U-rich sequences downstream of the polyadenylation signal of eukaryotic mRNAs. While CstF has been identified over 25 years ago, the architecture and contribution of each subunit to RNA recognition have not been fully understood. In this study, we provide a structural basis for the recruitment of CstF-50 to CstF via interaction with CstF-77 and establish that the hexameric assembly of CstF creates a high affinity platform to target various G/U-rich sequences...
November 24, 2017: Nucleic Acids Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29180719/population-mitogenomics-provides-insights-into-evolutionary-history-source-of-invasions-acnd-diversifying-selection-in-the-house-crow-corvus-splendens
#19
Urszula Krzemińska, Hernán E Morales, Chris Greening, Árpád S Nyári, Robyn Wilson, Beng Kah Song, Christopher M Austin, Paul Sunnucks, Alexandra Pavlova, Sadequr Rahman
The House Crow (Corvus splendens) is a useful study system for investigating the genetic basis of adaptations underpinning successful range expansion. The species originates from the Indian subcontinent, but has successfully spread through a variety of thermal environments across Asia, Africa and Europe. Here, population mitogenomics was used to investigate the colonisation history and to test for signals of molecular selection on the mitochondrial genome. We sequenced the mitogenomes of 89 House Crows spanning four native and five invasive populations...
November 28, 2017: Heredity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29180026/intramolecular-and-intermolecular-fret-sensors-for-gpcrs-monitoring-conformational-changes-and-beyond
#20
REVIEW
Michael Kauk, Carsten Hoffmann
Within the past decade, a large increase in structural knowledge from crystallographic studies has significantly fostered our understanding of the structural biology of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, information on dynamic events upon receptor activation or deactivation is not yet readily accessed by these structural approaches. GPCR-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer sensors or sensors for interacting proteins (e.g., G proteins or arrestins) can in part cover this gap...
November 24, 2017: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
keyword
keyword
83328
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"