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"fluid responsiveness"

Sebastien Preau, Perrine Bortolotti, Delphine Colling, Florent Dewavrin, Vincent Colas, Benoit Voisin, Thierry Onimus, Elodie Drumez, Alain Durocher, Alban Redheuil, Fabienne Saulnier
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the collapsibility index of the inferior vena cava recorded during a deep standardized inspiration predicts fluid responsiveness in nonintubated patients. DESIGN: Prospective, nonrandomized study. SETTING: ICUs at a general and a university hospital. PATIENTS: Nonintubated patients without mechanical ventilation (n = 90) presenting with sepsis-induced acute circulatory failure and considered for volume expansion...
September 30, 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Robert Sümpelmann, Karin Becke, Sebastian Brenner, Christian Breschan, Christoph Eich, Claudia Höhne, Martin Jöhr, Franz-Josef Kretz, Gernot Marx, Lars Pape, Markus Schreiber, Jochen Strauss, Markus Weiss
This consensus- based S1 Guideline for perioperative infusion therapy in children is focused on safety and efficacy. The objective is to maintain or re-establish the child's normal physiological state (normovolemia, normal tissue perfusion, normal metabolic function, normal acid- base- electrolyte status). Therefore, the perioperative fasting times should be as short as possible to prevent patient discomfort, dehydration, and ketoacidosis. A physiologically composed balanced isotonic electrolyte solution (BS) with 1-2...
October 17, 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Jana Ambrozic, Gabrijela Brzan Simenc, Katja Prokselj, Natasa Tul, Marta Cvijic, Miha Lucovnik
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate lung and cardiac ultrasound for assessment of fluid tolerance and fluid responsiveness in severe preeclamptic patients before and after delivery. METHODS: Severe preeclampsia patients and healthy term controls were included in the study. Lung ultrasound Echo Comet Score (ECS) was obtained using the 28-rib interspaces technique. Echocardiographic E/e' ratio, measured by pulsed wave and tissue Doppler, respectively, was used as a marker of diastolic left ventricular function...
October 13, 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Anton Krige, Martin Bland, Thomas Fanshawe
BACKGROUND: Passive leg raising (PLR) is a so called self-volume challenge used to test for fluid responsiveness. Changes in cardiac output (CO) or stroke volume (SV) measured during PLR are used to predict the need for subsequent fluid loading. This requires a device that can measure CO changes rapidly. The Vigileo™ monitor, using third-generation software, allows continuous CO monitoring. The aim of this study was to compare changes in CO (measured with the Vigileo device) during a PLR manoeuvre to calculate the accuracy for predicting fluid responsiveness...
2016: Journal of Intensive Care
Hendry Robert Sawe, Cathryn Haeffele, Juma A Mfinanga, Victor G Mwafongo, Teri A Reynolds
BACKGROUND: Bedside inferior vena cava (IVC) ultrasound has been proposed as a non-invasive measure of volume status. We compared ultrasound measurements of the caval index (CI) and physician gestalt to predict blood pressure response in patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation. METHODS: This was a prospective study of adult emergency department patients requiring fluid resuscitation. A structured data sheet was used to record serial vital signs and the treating clinician's impression of patient volume status and cause of hypotension...
2016: PloS One
Peter Bentzer, Donald E Griesdale, John Boyd, Kelly MacLean, Demetrios Sirounis, Najib T Ayas
IMPORTANCE: Fluid overload occurring as a consequence of overly aggressive fluid resuscitation may adversely affect outcome in hemodynamically unstable critically ill patients. Therefore, following the initial fluid resuscitation, it is important to identify which patients will benefit from further fluid administration. OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of fluid responsiveness in hemodynamically unstable patients with signs of inadequate organ perfusion. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966 to June 2016) and reference lists from retrieved articles, previous reviews, and physical examination textbooks for studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of tests to predict fluid responsiveness in hemodynamically unstable adult patients who were defined as having refractory hypotension, signs of organ hypoperfusion, or both...
September 27, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
T G V Cherpanath, B F Geerts, J J Maas, R B P de Wilde, A B Groeneveld, J R Jansen
BACKGROUND: Ventilator-induced dynamic hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume variation (SVV) and pulse pressure variation (PPV) have been shown to predict fluid responsiveness in contrast to static hemodynamic parameters such as central venous pressure (CVP). We hypothesized that the ventilator-induced central venous pressure variation (CVPV) could predict fluid responsiveness. METHODS: Twenty-two elective cardiac surgery patients were studied post-operatively on the intensive care unit during mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes of 6-8 ml/kg without spontaneous breathing efforts or cardiac arrhythmia...
November 2016: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
John H Boyd, Demetrios Sirounis, Julien Maizel, Michel Slama
BACKGROUND: In critically ill patients at risk for organ failure, the administration of intravenous fluids has equal chances of resulting in benefit or harm. While the intent of intravenous fluid is to increase cardiac output and oxygen delivery, unwelcome results in those patients who do not increase their cardiac output are tissue edema, hypoxemia, and excess mortality. Here we briefly review bedside methods to assess fluid responsiveness, focusing upon the strengths and pitfalls of echocardiography in spontaneously breathing mechanically ventilated patients as a means to guide fluid management...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Pongdhep Theerawit, Thotsaporn Morasert, Yuda Sutherasan
BACKGROUND: Currently, physicians employ pulse pressure variation (PPV) as a gold standard for predicting fluid responsiveness. However, employing ultrasonography in intensive care units is increasing, including using the ultrasonography for assessment of fluid responsiveness. Data comparing the performance of both methods are still lacking. This is the reason for the present study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study in patients with sepsis requiring fluid challenge...
August 13, 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Tom Peachey, Andrew Tang, Elinor C Baker, Jason Pott, Yonathan Freund, Tim Harris
BACKGROUND: Assessment of circulating volume and the requirement for fluid replacement are fundamental to resuscitation but remain largely empirical. Passive leg raise (PLR) may determine fluid responders while avoiding potential fluid overload. We hypothesised that inferior vena cava collapse index (IVCCI) and carotid artery blood flow would change predictably in response to PLR, potentially providing a non-invasive tool to assess circulating volume and identifying fluid responsive patients...
2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Erin Frazee, Kianoush Kashani
BACKGROUND: Intravenous fluids (IVF) are frequently utilized to restore intravascular volume in patients with distributive and hypovolemic shock. Although the benefits of the appropriate use of fluids in intensive care units (ICUs) and hospitals are well described, there is growing knowledge regarding the potential risks of volume overload and its impact on organ failure and mortality. To avoid volume overload and its associated complications, strategies to identify fluid responsiveness are developed and utilized more often among ICU patients...
June 2016: Kidney Diseases
Ole Broch, Jochen Renner, Patrick Meybohm, Martin Albrecht, Jan Höcker, Assad Haneya, Markus Steinfath, Berthold Bein, Matthias Gruenewald
OBJECTIVES: The reliability of dynamic and volumetric variables of fluid responsiveness in the presence of pericardial effusion is still elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate their predictive power in a porcine model with hemodynamic relevant pericardial effusion. DESIGN: A single-center animal investigation. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve German domestic pigs. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were studied before and during pericardial effusion...
October 2016: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
John H Boyd, Demetrios Sirounis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It has recently become evident that administration of intravenous fluids following initial resuscitation has a greater probability of producing tissue edema and hypoxemia than of increasing oxygen delivery. Therefore, it is essential to have a rational approach to assess the adequacy of volume resuscitation. Here we review passive leg raising (PLR) and respiratory variation in hemodynamics to assess fluid responsiveness. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of ultrasound enhances the clinician's ability to detect and predict fluid responsiveness, whereas enthusiasm for this modality must be tempered by recent evidence that it is only reliable in apneic patients...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Simon Tilma Vistisen
Fluid responsiveness prediction is an unsettled matter for most critical care patients and new methods relying only on the continuous basic monitoring are desired. It was hypothesized that the post-ectopic beat, which is associated with increased preload, could be analyzed in relation to preceding sinus beats and that the change in cardiac performance (e.g. systolic blood pressure) at the post-ectopic beat could predict fluid responsiveness. Cardiothoracic critical care patients scheduled for a 500 ml volume expansion were observed...
July 26, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Xiaobao Zhang, Jiying Feng, Pin Zhu, Hengfei Luan, Yong Wu, Zhibin Zhao
BACKGROUND: Both hypovolemia and hypervolemia are connected with increased morbidity and mortality in the treatment and prognosis of patients. An accurate assessment of volume state allows the optimization of organ perfusion and oxygen supply. Recently, ultrasonography has been used to detect hypovolemia in critically ill patients and perioperative patients. The objective of our study was to assess the correlation between inferior vena cava (IVC) variation obtained with ultrasound and stroke volume variation (SVV) measured by the Vigileo/FloTrac monitor, as fluid responsiveness indicators, in patients undergoing anesthesia for surgery...
July 2016: Journal of Surgical Research
Huseyin Konur, Gulay Erdogan Kayhan, Huseyin Ilksen Toprak, Nizamettin Bucak, Mustafa Said Aydogan, Saim Yologlu, Mahmut Durmus, Sezai Yılmaz
Fluid management is challenging and still remains controversial in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The pleth variability index (PVI) has been shown to be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness of perioperative and critically ill patients; however, it has not been evaluated in OLT. This study was designed to examine whether the PVI can reliably predict fluid responsiveness in OLT and to compare PVI with other hemodynamic indexes that are measured using the PiCCO2 monitoring system. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in this study...
July 2016: Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences
Weihua Zhu, Linjun Wan, Xiaohong Wan, Gang Wang, Meixian Su, Gengjin Liao, Qingqing Huang
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy and feasibility of brachial artery peak velocity variation (ΔVpeakbrach) and inferior vena cava variability (VIVC) as indicators of fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. METHODS: A single-center prospective observation was conducted. The patients on mechanical ventilation with spontaneously breathing admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University from June 2013 to August 2015 were enrolled...
August 2016: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Bruno De Broca, Jeremie Garnier, Marc-Olivier Fischer, Thomas Archange, Julien Marc, Osama Abou-Arab, Hervé Dupont, Emmanuel Lorne, Pierre-Grégoire Guinot
During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness.We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg, PEEP: 5-7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion...
July 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Elliot Long, Ed Oakley, Franz E Babl, Trevor Duke
BACKGROUND: Fluid bolus administration is widely recommended as part of the initial treatment of paediatric sepsis, though the physiological benefits and harms are unclear. The primary aim of this study is to determine the effect of fluid bolus administration on cardiac index (CI). Secondary aims are to determine the effect of fluid bolus administration on extra-vascular lung water (EVLW), whether fluid responsiveness can be predicted by inferior vena cava (IVC) collapsibility, and whether fluid responsiveness correlates with changes in vital signs...
2016: BMC Pediatrics
Marc O Fischer, Pierre G Guinot, Matthieu Biais, Yazine Mahjoub, Jihad Mallat, Emmanuel Lorne
Dynamic indices (based on cardiopulmonary interactions in mechanically ventilated patients in sinus rhythm) have been developed as simple tools for predicting fluid responsiveness in the absence of cardiac output monitoring. Although the earliest dynamic indices relied on the invasive measurement of pulse pressure variations or stroke volume variations, the most recently developed indices are based on non-invasive photoplethysmography. However, a number of confounding factors have been found to decrease the clinical value of these indices...
July 12, 2016: Minerva Anestesiologica
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