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Marine Ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339825/corallivory-and-the-microbial-debacle-in-two-branching-scleractinians
#1
Yvan Bettarel, Sébastien Halary, Jean-Christophe Auguet, Thanh Chi Mai, Ngoc Van Bui, Thierry Bouvier, Patrice Got, Corinne Bouvier, Sonia Monteil-Bouchard, Desnues Christelle
The grazing activity by specific marine organisms represents a growing threat to the survival of many scleractinian species. For example, the recent proliferation of the corallivorous gastropod Drupella now constitutes a critical case in all South-East Asian waters. If the damaging effects caused by this marine snail on coral polyps are relatively well known, the indirect incidence of predation on coral microbial associates is still obscure and might also potentially impair coral health. In this study, we compared the main ecological traits of coral-associated bacterial and viral communities living in the mucus layer of Acropora formosa and Acropora millepora, of healthy and predated individuals (i...
January 16, 2018: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339342/transgenerational-impairments-of-reproduction-and-development-of-the-marine-invertebrate-crepidula-onyx-resulted-from-long-term-dietary-exposure-of-2-2-4-4-tetrabromodiphenyl-ether-bde-47
#2
Beverly H K Po, Jill M Y Chiu
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers have become ubiquitous in the environment and elevated concentrations have often been found in marine organisms. Using the gastropod Crepidula onyx as a study model, this multigenerational study sets out to test the hypotheses that 1) parental dietary exposure to environmentally realistic levels of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) would lead to transgenerational impairments on fitness traits of marine invertebrates, and 2) the organisms might develop adaptation/acclimation after exposure for one or more generations...
January 12, 2018: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339333/coral-reefs-for-coastal-protection-a-new-methodological-approach-and-engineering-case-study-in-grenada
#3
Borja G Reguero, Michael W Beck, Vera N Agostini, Philip Kramer, Boze Hancock
Coastal communities in tropical environments are at increasing risk from both environmental degradation and climate change and require urgent local adaptation action. Evidences show coral reefs play a critical role in wave attenuation but relatively little direct connection has been drawn between these effects and impacts on shorelines. Reefs are rarely assessed for their coastal protection service and thus not managed for their infrastructure benefits, while widespread damage and degradation continues. This paper presents a systematic approach to assess the protective role of coral reefs and to examine solutions based on the reef's influence on wave propagation patterns...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Environmental Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29336499/ecologically-driven-ultrastructural-and-hydrodynamic-designs-in-stomatopod-cuticles
#4
Lessa Kay Grunenfelder, Garrett Milliron, Steven Herrera, Isaias Gallana, Nicholas Yaraghi, Nigel Hughes, Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt, Pablo Zavattieri, David Kisailus
Ecological pressures and varied feeding behaviors in a multitude of organisms have necessitated the drive for adaptation. One such change is seen in the feeding appendages of stomatopods, a group of highly predatory marine crustaceans. Stomatopods include "spearers," who ambush and snare soft bodied prey, and "smashers," who bludgeon hard-shelled prey with a heavily mineralized club. The regional substructural complexity of the stomatopod dactyl club from the smashing predator Odontodactylus scyllarus represents a model system in the study of impact tolerant biominerals...
January 16, 2018: Advanced Materials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29330422/seabirds-fighting-for-land-phenotypic-consequences-of-breeding-area-constraints-at-a-small-remote-archipelago
#5
Guilherme Tavares Nunes, Sophie Bertrand, Leandro Bugoni
Identifying associations between phenotypes and environmental parameters is crucial for understanding how natural selection acts at the individual level. In this context, genetically isolated populations can be useful models for identifying the forces selecting fitness-related traits. Here, we use a comprehensive dataset on a genetically and ecologically isolated population of the strictly marine bird, the brown booby Sula leucogaster, at the tropical and remote Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, mid-Atlantic Ocean, in order to detect phenotypic adjustments from interindividual differences in diet, foraging behaviour, and nest quality...
January 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29329085/an-integrated-approach-to-assess-the-impacts-of-zinc-pyrithione-at-different-levels-of-biological-organization-in-marine-mussels
#6
Lorna J Dallas, Andrew Turner, Tim P Bean, Brett P Lyons, Awadhesh N Jha
The mechanisms of sublethal toxicity of the antifouling biocide, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT), have not been well-studied. This investigation demonstrates that 14-d sublethal exposure to ZnPT (0.2 or 2 μM, alongside inorganic Zn and sea water controls) is genotoxic to mussel haemocytes but suggests that this is not caused by oxidative DNA damage as no significant induction of oxidised purines was detected by Fpg-modified comet assay. More ecologically relevant endpoints, including decreased clearance rate (CR), cessation of attachment and decreased tolerance of stress on stress (SoS), also showed significant response to ZnPT exposure...
December 27, 2017: Chemosphere
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29321880/ocean-acidification-ameliorates-harmful-effects-of-warming-in-primary-consumer
#7
Sindre Andre Pedersen, Anja Elise Hanssen
Climate change-induced warming and ocean acidification are considered two imminent threats to marine biodiversity and current ecosystem structures. Here, we have for the first time examined an animal's response to a complete life cycle of exposure to co-occurring warming (+3°C) and ocean acidification (+1,600 μatm CO 2), using the key subarctic planktonic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, as a model species. The animals were generally negatively affected by warming, which significantly reduced the females' energy status and reproductive parameters (respectively, 95% and 69%-87% vs...
January 2018: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29321586/chemicals-released-by-male-sea-cucumber-mediate-aggregation-and-spawning-behaviours
#8
Nathalie Marquet, Peter C Hubbard, José P da Silva, João Afonso, Adelino V M Canário
The importance of chemical communication in reproduction has been demonstrated in many marine broadcast spawners. However, little is known about the use of chemical communication by echinoderms, the nature of the compounds involved and their mechanism(s) of action. Here, the hypothesis that the sea cucumber Holothuria arguinensis uses chemical communication for aggregation and spawning was tested. Water conditioned by males, but not females, attracted both males and females; gonad homogenates and coelomic fluid had no effect on attraction...
January 10, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29319173/digest-drivers-of-coral-diversification-in-a-major-marine-biodiversity-hotspot
#9
Oscar Alejandro Pérez-Escobar, Susannah Cass, Steven Dodsworth
Coral reefs are of great ecological importance to marine ecosystems, yet their origins are still poorly understood. Using a robust phylogenetic framework, Huang et al. (2017) show that most diversity within the Indo-Pacific Coral Triangle region is driven by range expansions of lineages from outside the region, rather than rapid diversification within. This highlights the need for macroevolutionary studies to fully understand species assemblages in biodiversity hotspots, and the potential importance of adjacent areas for conservation...
January 10, 2018: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29316493/transmission-of-morbilliviruses-within-and-among-marine-mammal-species
#10
REVIEW
Wendy K Jo, Albert Dme Osterhaus, Martin Ludlow
Transmission of morbilliviruses within and among marine mammal species has been documented in a variety of marine habitats. Cetacean morbillivirus spreads between cetacean species in the aquatic environment whereas both phocine distemper virus and canine distemper virus have been associated with transmission within and between pinniped and terrestrial carnivore species in their natural habitat and at the aquatic-terrestrial interface. Periodically these viruses have caused large epizootics involving thousands of animals, due to sustained intra-species virus transmission...
January 6, 2018: Current Opinion in Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29315309/climate-change-could-drive-marine-food-web-collapse-through-altered-trophic-flows-and-cyanobacterial-proliferation
#11
Hadayet Ullah, Ivan Nagelkerken, Silvan U Goldenberg, Damien A Fordham
Global warming and ocean acidification are forecast to exert significant impacts on marine ecosystems worldwide. However, most of these projections are based on ecological proxies or experiments on single species or simplified food webs. How energy fluxes are likely to change in marine food webs in response to future climates remains unclear, hampering forecasts of ecosystem functioning. Using a sophisticated mesocosm experiment, we model energy flows through a species-rich multilevel food web, with live habitats, natural abiotic variability, and the potential for intra- and intergenerational adaptation...
January 2018: PLoS Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29309413/ecological-assessment-of-the-marine-ecosystems-of-barbuda-west-indies-using-rapid-scientific-assessment-to-inform-ocean-zoning-and-fisheries-management
#12
Benjamin Ruttenberg, Jennifer E Caselle, Andrew J Estep, Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Kristen L Marhaver, Lee J Richter, Stuart A Sandin, Mark J A Vermeij, Jennifer E Smith, David Grenda, Abigail Cannon
To inform a community-based ocean zoning initiative, we conducted an intensive ecological assessment of the marine ecosystems of Barbuda, West Indies. We conducted 116 fish and 108 benthic surveys around the island, and measured the abundance and size structure of lobsters and conch at 52 and 35 sites, respectively. We found that both coral cover and fish biomass were similar to or lower than levels observed across the greater Caribbean; live coral cover and abundance of fishery target species, such as large snappers and groupers, was generally low...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29306554/the-neglected-soil-virome-potential-role-and-impact
#13
REVIEW
Akbar Adjie Pratama, Jan Dirk van Elsas
Bacteriophages are among the most abundant and diverse biological units in the biosphere. They have contributed to our understanding of the central dogma of biology and have been instrumental in the evolutionary success of bacterial pathogens. In contrast to our current understanding of marine viral communities, the soil virome and its function in terrestrial ecosystems has remained relatively understudied. Here, we examine, in a comparative fashion, the knowledge gathered from studies performed in soil versus marine settings...
January 3, 2018: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29302268/time-capsules-in-natural-sediment-archives-tracking-phytoplankton-population-genetic-diversity-and-adaptation-over-multidecadal-timescales-in-the-face-of-environmental-change
#14
REVIEW
Marianne Ellegaard, Anna Godhe, Sofia Ribeiro
Undisturbed records of resting stages produced in the past and stored in coastal sediments are very valuable to science, because they may provide unique insights into past evolutionary and ecological trajectories. Within marine phytoplankton, multidecadal time series of monoclonal strains germinated from resting stages have been established for diatoms (Skeletonema marinoi) and dinoflagellates (Pentapharsodinium dalei), spanning ca. a century. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses of these time series have revealed effects of past environmental changes on population genetic structure...
January 2018: Evolutionary Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29301986/declining-oxygen-in-the-global-ocean-and-coastal-waters
#15
REVIEW
Denise Breitburg, Lisa A Levin, Andreas Oschlies, Marilaure Grégoire, Francisco P Chavez, Daniel J Conley, Véronique Garçon, Denis Gilbert, Dimitri Gutiérrez, Kirsten Isensee, Gil S Jacinto, Karin E Limburg, Ivonne Montes, S W A Naqvi, Grant C Pitcher, Nancy N Rabalais, Michael R Roman, Kenneth A Rose, Brad A Seibel, Maciej Telszewski, Moriaki Yasuhara, Jing Zhang
Oxygen is fundamental to life. Not only is it essential for the survival of individual animals, but it regulates global cycles of major nutrients and carbon. The oxygen content of the open ocean and coastal waters has been declining for at least the past half-century, largely because of human activities that have increased global temperatures and nutrients discharged to coastal waters. These changes have accelerated consumption of oxygen by microbial respiration, reduced solubility of oxygen in water, and reduced the rate of oxygen resupply from the atmosphere to the ocean interior, with a wide range of biological and ecological consequences...
January 5, 2018: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29299267/thresholds-of-sea-level-rise-rate-and-sea-level-rise-acceleration-rate-in-a-vulnerable-coastal-wetland
#16
Wei Wu, Patrick Biber, Matthew Bethel
Feedbacks among inundation, sediment trapping, and vegetation productivity help maintain coastal wetlands facing sea-level rise (SLR). However, when the SLR rate exceeds a threshold, coastal wetlands can collapse. Understanding the threshold helps address key challenges in ecology-nonlinear response of ecosystems to environmental change, promotes communication between ecologists and resource managers, and facilitates decision-making in climate change policies. We studied the threshold of SLR rate and developed a new threshold of SLR acceleration rate on sustainability of coastal wetlands as SLR is likely to accelerate due to enhanced anthropogenic forces...
December 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298310/echoes-from-the-past-regional-variations-in-recovery-within-a-harbour-seal-population
#17
Sophie M J M Brasseur, Peter J H Reijnders, Jenny Cremer, Erik Meesters, Roger Kirkwood, Lasse Fast Jensen, Armin Jeβ, Anders Galatius, Jonas Teilmann, Geert Aarts
Terrestrial and marine wildlife populations have been severely reduced by hunting, fishing and habitat destruction, especially in the last centuries. Although management regulations have led to the recovery of some populations, the underlying processes are not always well understood. This study uses a 40-year time series of counts of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in the Wadden Sea to study these processes, and demonstrates the influence of historical regional differences in management regimes on the recovery of this population...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298140/improving-marine-ecosystem-models-with-biochemical-tracers
#18
Heidi R Pethybridge, C Anela Choy, Jeffrey J Polovina, Elizabeth A Fulton
Empirical data on food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions underpin ecosystem models, which are increasingly used to support strategic management of marine resources. These data have traditionally derived from stomach content analysis, but new and complementary forms of ecological data are increasingly available from biochemical tracer techniques. Extensive opportunities exist to improve the empirical robustness of ecosystem models through the incorporation of biochemical tracer data and derived indices, an area that is rapidly expanding because of advances in analytical developments and sophisticated statistical techniques...
January 3, 2018: Annual Review of Marine Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298137/how-do-marine-pelagic-species-respond-to-climate-change-theories-and-observations
#19
Grégory Beaugrand, Richard R Kirby
In this review, we show how climate affects species, communities, and ecosystems, and why many responses from the species to the biome level originate from the interaction between the species' ecological niche and changes in the environmental regime in both space and time. We describe a theory that allows us to understand and predict how marine species react to climate-induced changes in ecological conditions, how communities form and are reconfigured, and so how biodiversity is arranged and may respond to climate change...
January 3, 2018: Annual Review of Marine Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297945/complex-demographic-heterogeneity-from-anthropogenic-impacts-in-a-coastal-marine-predator
#20
D Oro, D Álvarez, A Velando
Environmental drivers, including anthropogenic impacts, affect vital rates of organisms. Nevertheless, the influence of these drivers may depend on the physical features of the habitat and how they affect life history strategies depending on individual covariates such as age and sex. Here, the long-term monitoring (1994-2014) of marked European shags in eight colonies in two regions with different ecological features, such as foraging habitat, allowed us to test several biological hypotheses about how survival changes by age and sex in each region by means of multi-event capture-recapture modelling...
January 3, 2018: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
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