Read by QxMD icon Read


R Crippa, M Paglia, F Ferrante, A Ottonello, F Angiero
: BACKGROUND Often breastfeeding problems experienced by mothers and their babies may be attributed to the abnormal attachment of the infant's tongue (ankyloglossia) and/or maxillary lip-tie. Proper breastfeeding depends upon an infant's ability to correctly latch onto its mother's breast. If born with oral soft tissue abnormalities such as tongue-tie or lip-tie, it may be almost impossible for the infant to breastfeed. During the oral evaluation of an infant presenting with breastfeeding problems, one factor that is often overlooked and undiagnosed - and thus untreated - is the attachment of the upper lip to the maxillary gingival tissue...
September 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry: Official Journal of European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry
Elvira Ferrés-Amat, Tomasa Pastor-Vera, Paula Rodríguez-Alessi, Eduard Ferrés-Amat, Javier Mareque-Bueno, Eduard Ferrés-Padró
The problems of suction in newborns give rise to multiple consequences for both the mother and the newborn. The objective of this paper is to present a case of ankyloglossia ("tongue-tie") and the suction problems that were treated by a multidisciplinary team. The subject is a 17-day-old male patient, with ankyloglossia and suction problems during breastfeeding (pain in the breastfeeding mother, poor weight gain, and long breastfeeds). The patient followed the circuit established in our centre between the services of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Breastfeeding and Speech Therapy and Orofacial Rehabilitation (CELERE)...
2016: Case Reports in Pediatrics
Bobak A Ghaheri, Melissa Cole, Sarah C Fausel, Maria Chuop, Jess C Mace
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Numerous symptoms may arise that prevent mother-infant dyads from maintaining desired breastfeeding intervals. Investigations into treatments that positively influence breastfeeding outcomes allow for improved patient counseling for treatment decisions to optimize breastfeeding quality. This investigation aimed to determine the impact of surgical tongue-tie/lip-tie release on breastfeeding impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, cohort study from June 2014 to April 2015 in a private practice setting...
September 19, 2016: Laryngoscope
Lara Benoiton, Maggie Morgan, Katherine Baguley
OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have shown an association between ankyloglossia (tongue tie) and upper-lip ties to breastfeeding difficulties. Treatment is commonly multidisciplinary involving lactation consultants and surgical management with tongue tie and upper lip tie release. There is currently limited data looking at posterior ankyloglossia and upper lip ties. METHODS: Consecutive patients seen at an ENT outpatient clinic for ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties from May 2014-August 2015 were assessed for an outpatient frenotomy...
September 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Junsujee Wakhanrittee, Jiraporn Khorana, Siriphut Kiatipunsodsai
PURPOSE: To study the effects of frenulotomy on nipple pain, latch and the success in exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) at 3-month follow-up. METHODS: A prospective cross-sectional study of 328 mother-infant pairs with both tongue-tie and breastfeeding problems was performed. Nipple pain and latch were evaluated using numeric rating scale and LATCH score, respectively, and compared between pre and post-operatively at 24 h and 1 week. The success rate of EBF was assessed at 3 months after frenulotomy...
October 2016: Pediatric Surgery International
Caroline A Wilson, David Sommerfield, Thomas F E Drake-Brockman, Lita von Bieberstein, Anoop Ramgolam, Britta S von Ungern-Sternberg
BACKGROUND: It is well established that children experience significant pain for a considerable period following adenotonsillectomy. Less is known, however, about pain following other common head and neck operations. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the severity and duration of postoperative pain experienced by children undergoing elective head and neck procedures (primary outcomes). Behavioral disturbance, nausea and vomiting, parental satisfaction, and medical reattendance rates were also measured (secondary outcomes)...
October 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
K S Joseph, Brooke Kinniburgh, Amy Metcalfe, Neda Razaz, Yasser Sabr, Sarka Lisonkova
BACKGROUND: Routine surveillance of congenital anomalies has shown recent increases in ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) in British Columbia, Canada. We examined the temporal trends in ankyloglossia and its surgical treatment (frenotomy). METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study involving all live births in British Columbia from Apr. 1, 2004, to Mar. 31, 2014, with data obtained from the province's Perinatal Data Registry. Spatiotemporal trends in ankyloglossia and frenotomy, and associations with maternal and infant characteristics, were quantified using logistic regression analysis...
January 2016: CMAJ Open
Itai Shavit, Yael Peri-Front, Anda Rosen-Walther, Ruth E Grunau, Gal Neuman, Omri Nachmani, Gideon Koren, Dror Aizenbud
OBJECTIVE: To examine the comparative effectiveness of two topical anesthetics in controlling the pain associated with tongue-tie release (frenotomy) in young infants. DESIGN: Randomized trial. SETTING: A Pediatric Craniofacial Clinic. SUBJECTS: Forty-two infants who were referred for frenotomy were randomly allocated to receive the topical anesthetic gel 2% tetracaine or 20% benzocaine applied prior to frenotomy. Frenotomies were videotaped...
June 6, 2016: Pain Medicine: the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine
Phoebus Tsaousoglou, Nikolaos Topouzelis, Ioannis Vouros, Anton Sculean
BACKGROUND: Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital oral anomaly with short, tight, and thick lingual frenulum. It may be asymptomatic or can cause movement limitations of the tongue, speech and articulation difficulties, breastfeeding difficulties in neonates, as well as periodontal and malocclusion problems. The etiopathogenesis of ankyloglossia is unknown; it can occur either as a sole anomaly in the vast majority or in association with other craniofacial anomalies. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this paper were (1) to provide a comprehensive review on the criteria for clinical assessment and diagnosis, etiology and inheritance, and the therapeutic options of ankyloglossia; and (2) to demonstrate the treatment of ankyloglossia by means of frenuloplasty in three cases...
2016: Quintessence International
Christine Manipon
BACKGROUND: Our current culture defines breastfeeding and the use of human breast milk as the preferred criterion standard for infant nutrition. Medical and health professionals have a responsibility to support breastfeeding in the mother-infant dyad. This includes the recognition of anatomical barriers to breastfeeding such as a tongue-tie, ankyloglossia. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to enrich and expand the clinical knowledge of health professionals about the physical assessment of ankyloglossia and its impact on breastfeeding...
April 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Kritika Jangid, Aurelian Jovita Alexander, Nadathur Doraiswamy Jayakumar, Sheeja Varghese, Pratibha Ramani
Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome...
November 2015: Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
Jacqueline C Kent, Elizabeth Ashton, Catherine M Hardwick, Marnie K Rowan, Elisa S Chia, Kyle A Fairclough, Lalitha L Menon, Courtney Scott, Georgia Mather-McCaw, Katherine Navarro, Donna T Geddes
BACKGROUND: Persistent nipple pain is one of the most common reasons given by mothers for ceasing exclusive breastfeeding. We aimed to determine the frequency of nipple pain as a reason for consultation, the most common attributed aetiologies, and the effectiveness of the advice and treatment given. METHODS: All consultations at the Breast Feeding Centre of Western Australia (WA) were audited over two six-month periods in 2011 (n = 469) and 2014 (n = 708). Attributed cause(s) of nipple pain, microbiology results, treatment(s) advised, and resolution of pain were recorded...
October 2015: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Arundeep K Lamba, Kamal Aggarwal, Farrukh Faraz, Shruti Tandon, Kirti Chawla
Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is the result of a short and tight lingual frenum causing difficulty in speech, feeding problems in infants due to the limitation of tongue movement. This report presents a case of a 22-year-old female with tongue-tie who complained of difficulty in speech following which she underwent frenectomy procedure with erbium, chromium: yattrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser without any complications. She was referred to the speech therapist after the procedure.
July 2015: Indian Journal of Dentistry
S D Sharma, S Jayaraj
OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits of frenotomy on breastfeeding in infants, and determine the influence of age. METHODS: A telephone questionnaire of all patients diagnosed with tongue-tie over 12 months was conducted pre-intervention and 1-month post-intervention. The Infant Breastfeeding Assessment Tool was used to assess breastfeeding. RESULTS: Of 54 infants diagnosed with tongue-tie, 78 per cent of mothers participated in the survey. Eighty-six per cent of patients underwent frenotomy, with no surgical complications...
October 2015: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
Zibusiso Nyati-Jokomo, James January, Watch Ruparanganda, Inam Chitsike
The objective of this study was to explore cultural practices that could expose babies to HIV infection during the postnatal period in Chiota community in Zimbabwe. Purposively selected and gender disaggregated members of the community (n = 231) were informants to 23 focus group discussions and 8 semi-structured key-informant interviews. Data were analysed thematically. Emerging themes relating to risky practices were rituals surrounding open fontanelle, toning of child's sexual libido, initiation of sex after childbirth, treatment of eye and ear infections, tongue-tie and pre-mastication...
2016: AIDS Care
Anne Rowan-Legg
Ankyloglossia ('tongue-tie') is a relatively common congenital anomaly characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum, which may restrict tongue tip mobility. There is considerable controversy regarding its diagnosis, clinical significance and management, and there is wide variation in practice in this regard. Most infants with ankyloglossia are asymptomatic and do not exhibit feeding problems. Based on available evidence, frenotomy cannot be recommended for all infants with ankyloglossia. There may be an association between ankyloglossia and significant breastfeeding difficulties in some infants...
May 2015: Paediatrics & Child Health
Jack Donati-Bourne, Zainab Batool, Charles Hendrickse, Douglas Bowley
OBJECTIVES: Recent reports have highlighted the benefits of surgical division of tongue-tie (frenulotomy) in infants with breastfeeding difficulties. There is no clear consensus defining the appropriate age for this procedure to be undertaken in selected infants. We aimed to evaluate the impact of delays in time between referral and frenulotomy in relation to maternal abandonment of breastfeeding. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study done in out-patient Neonatal Surgery Department, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK, between April 2013 and July 2013...
January 2015: Journal of Neonatal Surgery
V Raveenthiran
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2012: Journal of Neonatal Surgery
Roberta Lopes de Castro Martinelli, Irene Queiroz Marchesan, Reinaldo Jordão Gusmão, Heitor Marques Honório, Giédre Berretin-Felix
UNLABELLED: Although the interference of tongue-tie with breastfeeding is a controversial subject, The use of lingual frenotomy has been widely indicated by health professionals. OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in breastfeeding patterns after lingual frenotomy concerning the number of sucks, pause length between groups of sucking and mother's complaints. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Oral yes/no questions about breastfeeding symptoms and sucking/swallowing/breathing coordination were answered by the mothers of 109, 30 day old infants...
March 2015: Journal of Applied Oral Science: Revista FOB
E J Crispe, G D Lester, I D Robertson, C J Secombe
REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Ambient temperature has been identified as a risk factor for exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH) in racing Thoroughbreds. This warranted a more expansive investigation of climatic conditions on the incidence and severity of EIPH. The impact of other variables such as the type of bit used, tongue ties and nonstandard shoes has not been reported and also warrant investigation. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of various climatic variables as contributing risk factors for EIPH...
July 2016: Equine Veterinary Journal
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"