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(Artificial OR supplemental) AND light*

Tania Dukic Willstrand, Thomas Broberg, Helena Selander
BACKGROUND: To maintain the mobility of older people in later life, it is essential to sustain their autonomy; however, driving is a complex task, requiring a large range of visual, psychomotor and cognitive abilities. Subsequently, a key issue is to measure and evaluate the fitness to drive of older drivers. Several methods have been proposed, among them the useful field of view (UFOV) test. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to identify driving characteristics in older drivers and the relationship between the UFOV test and the on-road driving results...
October 21, 2016: Gerontology
Gregory D M Potter, Debra J Skene, Josephine Arendt, Janet E Cade, Peter J Grant, Laura J Hardie
Circadian (∼ 24 hour) timing systems pervade all kingdoms of life, and temporally optimize behaviour and physiology in humans. Relatively recent changes to our environments, such as the introduction of artificial lighting, can disorganize the circadian system, from the level of the molecular clocks that regulate the timing of cellular activities to the level of synchronization between our daily cycles of behaviour and the solar day. Sleep/wake cycles are intertwined with the circadian system, and global trends indicate that these too are increasingly subject to disruption...
October 20, 2016: Endocrine Reviews
Carl Philipp Nothaft
This article deals with a forgotten treatise on the age of the world, written between 1308 and 1316 by Walter Odington, a monk of Evesham Abbey, otherwise known for his writings on alchemy and music theory. By tracing the sources and rationale behind Odington's arguments and comparing them with those of other medieval authors, the article attempts to shed new light on the state of chronological scholarship in England in the eleventh to fourteenth centuries, when astronomical and astrological methods were freely used to supplement or replace scriptural interpretation, yielding creative and unexpected results...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Sylwia Szotek, Joanna Dawidowicz, Brian Eyden, Natalia Matysiak, Aleksander Czogalla, Grzegorz Dudzik, Anna Leśniewicz, Krzysztof Maksymowicz
Fascia lata is an important element of the fascial system, which forms the continuum of connective tissue throughout the body. This deep fascia envelops the entire thigh and hip area and its main function is to transmit mechanical forces generated by the musculoskeletal system of the lower extremities. Fascia lata is also known as a useful and easily harvested graft material. Despite its crucial role in lower extremity biomechanics and wide-ranging applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery, both the structure of fascia lata and particularly the cells populating this tissue are relatively unexplored and therefore poorly understood...
October 20, 2016: Ultrastructural Pathology
M Garg, M Zhan, T T Luu, H Lakhotia, T Klostermann, A Guggenmos, E Goulielmakis
The frequency of electric currents associated with charge carriers moving in the electronic bands of solids determines the speed limit of electronics and thereby that of information and signal processing. The use of light fields to drive electrons promises access to vastly higher frequencies than conventionally used, as electric currents can be induced and manipulated on timescales faster than that of the quantum dephasing of charge carriers in solids. This forms the basis of terahertz (10(12) hertz) electronics in artificial superlattices, and has enabled light-based switches and sampling of currents extending in frequency up to a few hundred terahertz...
October 19, 2016: Nature
Chijun Li, Brandon K Tan, Jinshi Zhao, Ziqiang Guan
Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) makes up 5-20% of the phospholipids of Escherichia coli and is essential for growth in wild-type cells. PG is synthesized from the dephosphorylation of its immediate precursor, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate (PGP) whose synthase in E. coli is PgsA. Using genetic, biochemical and highly sensitive mass spectrometric approaches, we identified an alternative mechanism for PG synthesis in E. coli that is PgsA independent. The reaction of synthesis involves the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine and glycerol into PG and is catalyzed by ClsB, a phospholipase D-type cardiolipin synthase...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Mingming Wang, Wei Zhan
The grand scale, ultimate efficiency, and sustainability of natural photosynthesis have inspired generations of researchers in biomimetic light energy utilization. As an essential and ubiquitous component in all photosynthetic machinery, lipids and their assemblies have long been recognized as powerful molecular scaffolds in building artificial photosynthetic systems. Model lipid bilayers, such as black lipid membranes and liposomes (vesicles), have been extensively used to host natural as well as synthetic photo- and redox-active species, thereby enabling key photosynthetic processes, such as energy transfer and photoinduced electron transfer, to be examined in well-defined, natural-like membrane settings...
October 19, 2016: Accounts of Chemical Research
Yoshihiko Imanaka, Toshihisa Anazawa, Toshio Manabe, Hideyuki Amada, Sachio Ido, Fumiaki Kumasaka, Naoki Awaji, Gabriel Sánchez-Santolino, Ryo Ishikawa, Yuichi Ikuhara
The artificial photosynthesis technology known as the Honda-Fujishima effect, which produces oxygen and hydrogen or organic energy from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide, is an effective energy and environmental technology. The key component for the higher efficiency of this reaction system is the anode electrode, generally composed of a photocatalyst formed on a glass substrate from electrically conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). To obtain a highly efficient electrode, a dense film composed of a nanoparticulate visible light responsive photocatalyst that usually has a complicated multi-element composition needs to be deposited and adhered onto the FTO...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Thomas Raap, Giulia Casasole, David Costantini, Hamada AbdElgawad, Han Asard, Rianne Pinxten, Marcel Eens
Artificial light at night (ALAN), termed light pollution, is an increasingly important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wildlife. Exposure to unnatural lighting environments may have profound effects on animal physiology, particularly during early life. Here, we experimentally investigated for the first time the impact of ALAN on body mass and oxidative status during development, using nestlings of a free-living songbird, the great tit (Parus major), an important model species. Body mass and blood oxidative status were determined at baseline (=13 days after hatching) and again after a two night exposure to ALAN...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Maria Regina Torloni, Ana Pilar Betrán, José M Belizán
The Birth in Brazil study is the largest national hospital-based survey in Brazil regarding birth practices. Conducted in 2011-2012, it collected information from 266 public and private healthcare facilities and interviewed nearly 24,000 postpartum women. It is also the latest effort to map out how labor and delivery are managed in this county in the 21st century. The journal Reproductive Health has published a supplement including 10 articles presenting the results of a series of analyses using this valuable resource...
October 17, 2016: Reproductive Health
Svatopluk Binder, Adéla Hanáková, Kristína Tománková, Klára Pížová, Robert Bajgar, Barbora Manišová, Kristina Kejlová, Hana Bendová, Dagmar Jírová, Hana Kolářová
AIM: Natural or artificial substances have become an inseparable part of our lives. It is questionable whether adequate testing has been performed in order to ensure these substances do not pose a serious health risk. The principal aim of our research was to clarify the potential risk of adding essential oils to food, beverages and cosmetic products. METHODS: The toxicity of substances frequently employed in cosmetics, aromatherapy and food industry (bergamot oil, Litsea cubeba oil, orange oil, citral) were investigated using cell line NIH3T3 (mouse fibroblasts) with/without UV irradiation...
September 2016: Central European Journal of Public Health
Tomonori Sato, Yoshiaki Ito, Takashi Nagasawa
Sarcopenia is a condition of the loss of muscle mass that is associated with aging and that increases the risk for bedridden state, thereby warranting studies of interventions that attenuate sarcopenia. Here the effects of 2-month dietary L-lysine (Lys) supplementation (1.5-3.0 %) on myofibrillar protein degradation and major proteolytic systems were investigated in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8). At 36 weeks of age, skeletal muscle and lean body mass was reduced in SAMP8 when compared with control senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1)...
October 17, 2016: Biogerontology
Md Mostafizur Rahman, Sanaz Khosravi, Kyung Hoon Chang, Sang-Min Lee
This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary astaxanthin levels on growth performance, feed utilization, muscle pigmentation, and antioxidant capacity in juvenile rainbow trout. Four experimental diets were formulated to contain 0, 50, 75, and 100 mg/kg astaxanthin (designed as AX0, AX50, AX75, and AX100). Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of fish (18.5 g/fish) for 10 weeks. Growth performance and muscle composition of fish were not affected by dietary astaxanthin levels. Total carotenoid concentration in the muscle of fish fed the AX50 diet was higher than that of fish fed the AX0 diet, but no significant differences were observed between these fish and those fed the AX75 and AX100 diets...
September 2016: Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
Wei Li, Lorenzo Katin-Grazzini, Sanalkumar Krishnan, Chandra Thammina, Rania El-Tanbouly, Huseyin Yer, Emily Merewitz, Karl Guillard, John Inguagiato, Richard J McAvoy, Zongrang Liu, Yi Li
When subjected to shade, plants undergo rapid shoot elongation, which often makes them more prone to disease and mechanical damage. Shade-tolerant plants can be difficult to breed; however, they offer a substantial benefit over other varieties in low-light areas. Although perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a popular species of turf grasses because of their good appearance and fast establishment, the plant normally does not perform well under shade conditions. It has been reported that, in turfgrass, induced dwarfism can enhance shade tolerance...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
D G A B Oonincx, N Volk, J J E Diehl, J J A van Loon, G Belušič
Mating in the black soldier fly (BSF) is a visually mediated behaviour that under natural conditions occurs in full sunlight. Artificial light conditions promoting mating by BSF were designed based on the spectral characteristics of the compound eye retina. Electrophysiological measurements revealed that BSF ommatidia contained UV-, blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptor cells, allowing trichromatic vision. An illumination system for indoor breeding based on UV, blue and green LEDs was designed and its efficiency was compared with illumination by fluorescent tubes which have been successfully used to sustain a BSF colony for five years...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Insect Physiology
Baohu Dai, Jizhuang Wang, Ze Xiong, Xiaojun Zhan, Wei Dai, Chien-Cheng Li, Shien-Ping Feng, Jinyao Tang
Phototaxis is commonly observed in motile photosynthetic microorganisms. For example, green algae are capable of swimming towards a light source (positive phototaxis) to receive more energy for photosynthesis, or away from a light source (negative phototaxis) to avoid radiation damage or to hide from predators. Recently, with the aim of applying nanoscale machinery to biomedical applications, various inorganic nanomotors based on different propulsion mechanisms have been demonstrated. The only method to control the direction of motion of these self-propelled micro/nanomotors is to incorporate a ferromagnetic material into their structure and use an external magnetic field for steering...
October 17, 2016: Nature Nanotechnology
Monika Kasztura, Magdalena Dzięgała, Kamil Kobak, Jacek Bania, Grzegorz Mazur, Waldemar Banasiak, Piotr Ponikowski, Ewa Anita Jankowska
: Background Iron is presumed to play an important role in functioning of cardiomyocytes and skeletal myocytes. There is scarcity of direct data characterizing the cells functioning when exposed to iron depletion or iron overload in cellular environment. There is some clinical evidence demonstrating that iron deficiency has serious negative prognostic consequence in heart failure (HF) patients and its correction brought clinical benefit. BACKGROUND: Iron is presumed to play an important role in functioning of cardiomyocytes and skeletal myocytes...
October 17, 2016: Kardiologia Polska
Morteza Amjadi, Metin Sitti
There is an increasing demand for soft actuators because of their importance in soft robotics, artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, and beyond. However, the development of soft actuators capable of low-voltage operation, powerful actuation, and programmable shape-changing is still challenging. In this work, we propose programmable bilayer actuators that operate based on the large hygroscopic contraction of the copy paper and simultaneously large thermal expansion of the polypropylene film upon increasing the temperature...
October 16, 2016: ACS Nano
Taeko Mizutani, Hijiri Sumida, Yuki Sagawa, Yuri Okano, Hitoshi Masaki
BACKGROUND: Carbonylated proteins (CPs) are generated by the reaction of basic amino acid residues in proteins with aldehyde compounds produced during lipid peroxidation. CPs in the stratum corneum (SC) impact skin conditions such as skin moisture functions including water content and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In addition, CPs can be frequently seen in the SC from sun-exposed sites compared with sun-protected sites. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to reveal whether CPs could be a generation source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the SC following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and to identify the type of ROS and its generation mechanism...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Dermatological Science
Wei Zhou, Yen-Ling Liu, Audrey M Stallworth, Chunsong Ye, John J Lenhart
We investigated the evolution in silver nanoparticle (AgNP) properties during a series of 10 - 50 day experiments on suspensions with different pH (5 - 9), electrolyte type (NaNO3 and NaCl) and concentration (2 mM and 6 mM), Suwanee River humic acid (SRHA) concentration (0 - 13.2 mg C/L) and light exposure (artificial sun light exposure for 8h per day or dark). Of these factors, pH most influenced the AgNPs' properties as it modifies surface charge as well as AgNP dissolution and oxidation, and Ag+ reduction reactions...
October 14, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
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