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Active learning

Rebekah Carter, Yenna Salamonson, Lucie M Ramjan, Elizabeth Halcomb
BACKGROUND: Timely and meaningful feedback is essential to promote active learning and student engagement with learning. However, achieving this remains elusive, particularly in undergraduate nursing programs that admit large student cohorts. One strategy to provide meaningful en masse feedback is to provide feed-forward support by using exemplars. To date, there has been limited evaluation of the effectiveness of this feedback strategy. OBJECTIVE: To review the impact of using exemplars as a feedback strategy to support student academic writing in higher education...
March 3, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Fabien Cignetti, Marianne Vaugoyeau, Aurelie Fontan, Marianne Jover, Marie-Odile Livet, Catherine Hugonenq, Frédérique Audic, Brigitte Chabrol, Christine Assaiante
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Feedforward and online controls are two facets of predictive motor control from internal models, which is suspected to be impaired in learning disorders. We examined whether the feedforward component is affected in children (8-12 years) with developmental dyslexia (DD) and/or with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) compared to typically developing (TD) children. METHODS: Children underwent a bimanual unloading paradigm during which a load supported to one arm, the postural arm, was either unexpectedly unloaded by a computer or voluntary unloaded by the subject with the other arm...
March 13, 2018: Research in Developmental Disabilities
William W L Sampson, Sara A Khan, Eric J Nisenbaum, Jerald D Kralik
Abstraction allows us to discern regularities beyond the specific instances we encounter. It also promotes creative problem-solving by enabling us to consider unconventional problem solutions. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. Because it is often difficult to isolate human high-level cognitive processes, we utilized a nonhuman primate model, in which rhesus monkeys appear to use similar processes to consider an unconventional solution to the difficult reverse-reward problem: i...
March 13, 2018: Cognition
Aleksandra Klobučar, Vera Folnegović-Šmalc, Dubravka Kocijan-Hercigonja, Slavica Sović, Ljiljana Gulić
BACKGROUND: The main goal of this study was to analyse and show clinical characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in 38 participants aged between 10 and 17 with DSM-IV diagnoses of Trichotillomania (TTM) that we were treating at Children's Hospital Zagreb from 2008 to 2017. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We analyzed the data obtained from semi-structured interviews by the criteria of DSM-IV, Youth Self Report (YSR) (Achenbach & Rescorla 2001) and survey that we created...
March 2018: Psychiatria Danubina
Md Moniruzzaman, Young-Won Chin, Jungsook Cho
Physalis alkekengi var. francheti is an indigenous herb well known for its anti-inflammatory, sedative, antipyretic, and expectorant properties. However, the information regarding the impacts of P. alkekengi fruits (PAF) in modulation of oxidative stress and learning memory are still unknown. This study therefore evaluated the antioxidant properties of ethyl acetate (EA) fraction of PAF and its impacts on learning and memory. The antioxidant activities of PAF were evaluated in LPS-induced BV2 microglial cells...
March 15, 2018: Cell Stress & Chaperones
Emily Goldmann, James H Stark, Farzana Kapadia, Matthew B McQueen
The rapid growth in undergraduate public health education has offered an increasing number of undergraduate students training in epidemiology. Epidemiology courses introduce undergraduate students to a population health perspective and provide opportunities for these students to build essential skills and competencies such as ethical reasoning, teamwork, comprehension of scientific methods, critical thinking, quantitative and information literacy, ability to analyze public health information, and effective writing and oral communication...
March 13, 2018: American Journal of Epidemiology
Misato Yoshikawa, Yoshiyuki Soeda, Makoto Michikawa, Osborne F X Almeida, Akihiko Takashima
Hippocampal hyperactivity, ascribed to amyloid β (Aβ)-induced imbalances in neural excitation and inhibition, is found in patients with mild cognitive impairment, a prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand the relationship between hippocampal hyperactivity and the molecular triggers of behavioral impairments in AD, we used Mn-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to assess neuronal activity after subjecting mice to a task requiring spatial learning and memory. Depletion of endogenous tau in an amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic (J20) mouse line was shown to ameliorate hippocampal hyperactivity in J20 animals, tau depletion failed to reverse memory deficits associated with APP/Aβ overproduction...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Felix Weissenberger, Marcelo Matheus Gauy, Johannes Lengler, Florian Meier, Angelika Steger
In computational neuroscience, synaptic plasticity rules are often formulated in terms of firing rates. The predominant description of in vivo neuronal activity, however, is the instantaneous rate (or spiking probability). In this article we resolve this discrepancy by showing that fluctuations of the membrane potential carry enough information to permit a precise estimate of the instantaneous rate in balanced networks. As a consequence, we find that rate based plasticity rules are not restricted to neuronal activity that is stable for hundreds of milliseconds to seconds, but can be carried over to situations in which it changes every few milliseconds...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
James P Roach, Aleksandra Pidde, Eitan Katz, Jiaxing Wu, Nicolette Ognjanovski, Sara J Aton, Michal R Zochowski
Network oscillations across and within brain areas are critical for learning and performance of memory tasks. While a large amount of work has focused on the generation of neural oscillations, their effect on neuronal populations' spiking activity and information encoding is less known. Here, we use computational modeling to demonstrate that a shift in resonance responses can interact with oscillating input to ensure that networks of neurons properly encode new information represented in external inputs to the weights of recurrent synaptic connections...
March 15, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Gilda Fazzari, Merylin Zizza, Anna Di Vito, Raffaella Alò, Maria Mele, Rosalinda Bruno, Barni Tullio, Rosa Maria Facciolo, Canonaco Marcello
Recent indications are suggesting that high fat and sugar-enriched foods do not only evoke harmful physiological conditions, but they also endure evident structural alterations in cerebral regions controlling cognitive and feeding behaviors. Food consumption plus neuronal energy regulatory mechanisms seem to constitute a complex system assuring that food calories do not exceed body requirements. At the same time obesogenic-related properties of limbic feeding stations like the hypothalamus (HTH), hippocampus (HIP) and amygdala (AMY) tend to control eating habits through the interaction of distinct neuropeptides...
March 12, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Richard W Foltin
The reinforcing efficacy of vaporized methamphetamine HCl (0.3 mg/kg) was determined in baboons with minimal previous drug exposure. A group of 8 adult male baboons was tested prior to a group of 7 adult female baboons. Baboons were initially trained to suck on a brass stem activating a pressure-sensitive relay (i.e., puff), to receive one M&M® candy. Five of the 8 males and 6 of the 7 females learned to activate the relay. 0.05 ml of 95% ethyl alcohol containing 0.3 mg/kg methamphetamine was vaporized and delivered to the mouth of the baboon after he/she completed 2 puffs; a single candy was given after an additional 5 puffs to ensure that baboons continued puffing after the aerosol entered their mouths...
March 12, 2018: Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior
Cong Lu, Yan Wang, Jingwei Lv, Ning Jiang, Bei Fan, Lina Qu, Yinghui Li, Shanguang Chen, Fengzhong Wang, Xinmin Liu
Sleep deprivation (SD) negatively caused cognitive deficit, which was associated with oxidative stress induced damage. Ginsenoside Rh2 had the ability to protect against damage caused by reactive oxygen species in vitro, showing antioxidant property. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Ginsenoside Rh2 could prevent SD-induced cognitive deficit via its antioxidant properties. In this study, the effect of Ginsenoside Rh2 on memory impairment induced by sleep deprivation was investigated. The mice were sleep deprived continuously for 14 days using our self-made Sleep Interruption Apparatus (SIA)...
March 12, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Yoonjin Nah, Na-Young Shin, Sehjung Yi, Seung-Koo Lee, Sanghoon Han
Numerous studies have suggested that postpartum women show a decline in cognitive abilities. However, to date, no study has investigated the presence of qualitative alterations in recognition memory processes in postpartum women that may lead to a decline in cognitive ability. To address this issue, we employed the Remember/Know procedure and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Behavioral results demonstrated that compared with the matched control (CTRL) group, the postpartum (PP) group endorsed "Remember" less and "Know" more to old items...
March 12, 2018: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Daniel M Stout, Daniel E Glenn, Dean T Acheson, Andrea D Spadoni, Victoria B Risbrough, Alan N Simmons
Contextual threat learning reflects two often competing processes: configural and elemental learning. Configural threat learning is a hippocampal-dependent process of forming a conjunctive representation of a context through binding of several multi-modal elements. In contrast, elemental threat-learning is governed by the amygdala and involves forming associative relationships between individual features within the context. Contextual learning tasks in humans however, rarely probe if a learned fear response is truly due to configural learning vs...
March 12, 2018: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
C E Willis, S Reid, C Elliott, M Rosenberg, A Nyquist, R Jahnsen, S Girdler
BACKGROUND: The need to identify strategies that facilitate involvement in physical activity for children and youth with disabilities is recognised as an urgent priority. This study aimed to describe the association between context, mechanisms and outcome(s) of a participation-focused physical activity intervention to understand what works, in what conditions, and how. METHODS: This study was designed as a realist evaluation. Participant recruitment occurred through purposive and theoretical sampling of children and parents participating in the Local Environment Model intervention at Beitostolen Healthsports Centre in Norway...
March 15, 2018: BMC Pediatrics
Michela Balconi, Laura Gatti, Maria Elide Vanutelli
Cooperation behavior is a core question of study on social neuroscience. In the present study, inter-brain functional connectivity and cognitive performance were considered during joint which was failing. The cognitive performance and the EEG (brain oscillations from delta to beta) underlying the execution of joint-actions were recorded when dyads of participants executed synchronicity game and received reinforcing negative feedbacks A pre-feedback condition (cooperation) and a control condition (individual task, T0) were provided as well as a check for possible learning effect (time series analysis)...
March 12, 2018: Consciousness and Cognition
Erin L Beatty, Alexandra Muller-Gass, Dorothy Wojtarowicz, Marie-Eve Jobidon, Ingrid Smith, Quan Lam, Oshin Vartanian
Humans rely on topographical memory to encode information about spatial aspects of environments. However, even though people adopt different strategies when learning new maps, little is known about the impact of those strategies on topographical memory, and their neural correlates. To examine that issue, we presented participants with 40 unfamiliar maps, each of which displayed one major route and three landmarks. Half were instructed to memorize the maps by focusing on the route, whereas the other half memorized the maps by focusing on the landmarks...
March 14, 2018: Neuroreport
A V Dolzhich, S E Avetisov
PURPOSE: to assess the neurophysiological effect and clinical effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation in combination with drug therapy in amblyopic children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study involved 32 healthy children in the age of 5-12 years and 97 patients of the same age with refractive strabismic amblyopia. All study subjects underwent standard examination including ophthalmological (visometry, refractometry in normal conditions and in cycloplegia, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, type of vision), neurophysiological methods (determination of retinal electric sensitivity threshold, electric lability of optic nerve, amplitude and latency period of visual evoked potentials, electroencephalogram wave amplitudes, localization of peak electrical activity area of the cerebral cortex), assessment of neuropsychic development and estimation of mental development coefficient with age tests...
2018: Vestnik Oftalmologii
Sarah A Amin, Paula J Duquesnay, Catherine M Wright, Kenneth Chui, Christina D Economos, Jennifer M Sacheck
PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES) may impact children's physical activity (PA) behaviors and confidence to participate in PA. We examined how SES modifies the relationship between children's perceived athletic competence (PAC) and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA). METHODS: Children (N = 1157; 45% male; grades 3-4) were recruited for the Fueling Learning through Exercise study. Free/reduced price lunch eligibility was used as an indicator of SES. Seven-day accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) was used to measure daily MVPA, out-of-school MVPA (O-MVPA), and school-time MVPA...
March 15, 2018: Pediatric Exercise Science
F Mushtaq, C O'Driscoll, Fct Smith, D Wilkins, N Kapur, R Lawton
Background Confidential reporting systems play a key role in capturing information about adverse surgical events. However, the value of these systems is limited if the reports that are generated are not subjected to systematic analysis. The aim of this study was to provide the first systematic analysis of data from a novel surgical confidential reporting system to delineate contributory factors in surgical incidents and document lessons that can be learned. Methods One-hundred and forty-five patient safety incidents submitted to the UK Confidential Reporting System for Surgery over a 10-year period were analysed using an adapted version of the empirically-grounded Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
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