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non-invasive ventilation AND weaning

Neeraj Mukesh Shah, Rebecca Francesca D'Cruz, Patrick B Murphy
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Patients with COPD and respiratory failure, whether acute or chronic have a poorer prognosis than patients without respiratory failure. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to be a useful tool in both the acute hospital and chronic home care setting. NIV has been well established as the gold standard therapy for acute decompensated respiratory failure complicating an acute exacerbation of COPD with reduced mortality and intubation rates compared to standard therapy...
January 2018: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Keren Mandelzweig, Aleksandra Leligdowicz, Srinivas Murthy, Rejani Lalitha, Robert A Fowler, Neill K J Adhikari
PURPOSE: We systematically reviewed the effects of NIV for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in low- and low-middle income countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE (to January 2016) for observational studies and trials of NIV for ARF or in the peri-extubation period in adults and post-neonatal children. We abstracted outcomes data and assessed quality. Meta-analyses used random-effect models. RESULTS: Fifty-four studies (ten pediatric/n=1099; 44 adult/n=2904), mostly South Asian, were included...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Critical Care
L M Sandoval Moreno, I C Casas Quiroga, E C Wilches Luna, A F García
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of respiratory muscular training in the weaning of mechanical ventilation and respiratory muscle strength in patients on mechanical ventilation of 48hours or more. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial of parallel groups, double-blind. Ambit: Intensive Care Unit of a IV level clinic in the city of Cali. PATIENTS: 126 patients in mechanical ventilation for 48hours or more. INTERVENTIONS: The experimental group received daily a respiratory muscle training program with treshold, adjusted to 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure, additional to standard care, conventional received standard care of respiratory physiotherapy...
February 2, 2018: Medicina Intensiva
Daozheng Huang, Huan Ma, Wenzhao Zhong, Xiaoting Wang, Yan Wu, Tiehe Qin, Shouhong Wang, Ning Tan
Background: Ultrasonography (US) is a non-invasive and commonly available bedside diagnostic tool. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of M-mode US on ventilator weaning outcomes in elderly patients. Methods: This was a single center, prospective, observational study in patients aged 80 years or older who were in the medical intensive care unit, had undergone mechanical ventilation for >48 hours, and met the criteria for a spontaneous breathing trial (SBT)...
September 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Sun Mi Kim, Yu Hui Won, Seong-Woong Kang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Andrea Cikova, Diana Vavrincova-Yaghi, Peter Vavrinec, Anna Dobisova, Andrea Gebhardtova, Zora Flassikova, Mark A Seelen, Robert H Henning, Aktham Yaghi
BACKGROUND: Post-transplant tuberculosis (PTTB) is a serious opportunistic infection in renal graft recipients with a 30-70 fold higher incidence compared to the general population. PTTB occurs most frequently within the first years after transplantation, manifesting as pulmonary or disseminated TB. Gastrointestinal TB (GITB) is a rare and potentially lethal manifestation of PTTB and may show delayed onset in renal transplant recipients due to the use of lower doses of immunosuppressants...
November 28, 2017: BMC Gastroenterology
Jieying Luo, Xiaotong Han, Maiying Fan, Hui Wen, Jing Xu, Yanfang Pei, Ying Huang
Diaphragm dysfunction is common in clinical work, which is a frequently important cause of ventilation weaning failure ignored by clinicians. Assessing diaphragmatic function while weaning helps early detection and prevention of weaning failure, so as to improve the clinical outcome of patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). Reviewing studies of diaphragmatic function evaluation in weaning, we can find that assessing diaphragmatic function during weaning can help guide weaning. Weaning predictors including pressure index, electrophysiological index and morphological index, among which bedside ultrasound as a morphological index is widely used in intensive care unit (ICU), which is simple, non-invasive, and easy to operate...
November 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
W Windisch, M Dreher, J Geiseler, K Siemon, J Brambring, D Dellweg, B Grolle, S Hirschfeld, T Köhnlein, U Mellies, S Rosseau, B Schönhofer, B Schucher, A Schütz, H Sitter, S Stieglitz, J Storre, M Winterholler, P Young, S Walterspacher
Today, invasive and non-invasive home mechanical ventilation have become a well-established treatment option. Consequently, in 2010 the German Society of Pneumology and Mechanical Ventilation (DGP) has leadingly published the guidelines on "Non-Invasive and Invasive Mechanical Ventilation for Treatment of Chronic Respiratory Failure". However, continuing technical evolutions, new scientific insights, and health care developments require an extensive revision of the guidelines.For this reason, the updated guidelines are now published...
November 2017: Pneumologie
Francesco Alessandri, Francesco Pugliese, Luciana Mascia, Marco V Ranieri
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Aim of this article is to review evidence recently generated on the application of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requiring mechanical ventilation (invasive and non invasive) for hypercapnic respiratory failure. RECENT FINDINGS: To date, the paucity of evidences on ECCO2R to decrease the rate of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) failure and to wean hypercapnic patients from invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) precludes to systematically apply this technology to COPD patients...
February 2018: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Dominic A Fitzgerald
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
Calum T Roberts, Kate A Hodgson
Nasal High Flow (HF) is a mode of 'non-invasive' respiratory support for preterm infants, with several potential modes of action, including generation of distending airway pressure, washout of the nasopharyngeal dead space, reduction of work of breathing, and heating and humidification of inspired gas. HF has several potential advantages over continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the most commonly applied form of non-invasive support, such as reduced nasal trauma, ease of use, and infant comfort, which has led to its rapid adoption into neonatal care...
2017: Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
Sakhee Kotecha, Catherine Buchan, Kerry Parker, Jo Toghill, Eldho Paul, Belinda Miller, Matthew Naughton, Gregory Snell, Eli Dabscheck
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The benefits of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (NIV) post lung transplantation (LTx) have not previously been described. This was a single-centre retrospective audit of patients requiring domiciliary NIV post-LTx. Our aim was to describe indications for NIV and outcomes in chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) and diaphragmatic palsy. METHODS: All patients requiring domiciliary NIV post-LTx between 2010 and June 2016 were assessed...
January 2018: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
Wilfredo De Jesus Rojas, Cheryl L Samuels, Traci R Gonzales, Katrina E McBeth, Aravind Yadav, James M Stark, Cindy Jon, Ricardo A Mosquera
BACKGROUND: Nasal non-invasive-ventilation (Nasal NIV) is a mode of ventilatory support providing positive pressure to patients via a nasal interface. The RAM Cannula is an oxygen delivery device that can be used as an alternative approach to deliver positive pressure. Together they have been successfully used to provide respiratory support in neonatal in-patient settings. OBJECTIVE: To describe the outpatient use of Nasal NIV/RAM Cannula as a feasible alternative for home respiratory support in children with chronic respiratory failure...
2017: Open Respiratory Medicine Journal
Hong Wang, Ming Jia, Bin Mao, Xiaotong Hou
Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) is used in cardiopulmonary failure patients to provide temporary assisted circulation. Usually, prolonged intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation are required in patients with ECMO support. We report on two cases of patients who had no pre-existing injuries of the affected lung, underwent VA ECMO support after open-heart surgery and received airway extubation (AE) or awake ECMO with the recovery of left ventricular ejection fraction. Atelectasis happened after AE and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation attenuated the atelectasis of one patient...
September 2017: Perfusion
Thomas-Michael Schneider, Tibor Bence, Franz Brettner
BACKGROUND: Near-fatal asthma attacks are life threatening events that often require mechanical ventilation. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) is, beside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a well-established rescue option whenever ventilation gets to its limits. But there seems to be very rare experience with those techniques in avoiding mechanical ventilation in severe asthma attacks. CASE PRESENTATION: A 67-year-old man with a near-fatal asthma attack deteriorated under non-invasive ventilation conditions...
2017: Journal of Intensive Care
Sarah B Schwarz, Wolfram Windisch, Friederike S Magnet, Claudia Schmoor, Christian Karagiannidis, Jens Callegari, Sophie E Huttmann, Jan H Storre
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Continuous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) assessment is essential for the success of mechanical ventilation (MV). Non-invasive end-tidal PCO2 (PetCO2 ) and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2 ) measurements serve as alternatives to the gold standard arterial PCO2 (PaCO2 ) method, but their eligibility in critical care is unclear. METHODS: The present study therefore performed methodological comparisons of PaCO2 versus PetCO2 and PtcCO2 , respectively, in weaning patients receiving invasive MV via tracheal cannulas...
November 2017: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
C Girault, A Gacouin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 10, 2017: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires
Karim Asehnoune, Ségolène Mrozek, Pierre François Perrigault, Philippe Seguin, Claire Dahyot-Fizelier, Sigismond Lasocki, Anne Pujol, Mathieu Martin, Russel Chabanne, Laurent Muller, Jean Luc Hanouz, Emmanuelle Hammad, Bertrand Rozec, Thomas Kerforne, Carole Ichai, Raphael Cinotti, Thomas Geeraerts, Djillali Elaroussi, Paolo Pelosi, Samir Jaber, Marie Dalichampt, Fanny Feuillet, Véronique Sebille, Antoine Roquilly
PURPOSE: We assessed outcomes in brain-injured patients after implementation of a multi-faceted approach to reduce respiratory complications in intensive care units. METHODS: Prospective nationwide before-after trial. Consecutive adults with acute brain injury requiring mechanical ventilation for ≥24 h in 20 French intensive care units (ICUs) were included. The management of invasive ventilation in brain-injured patients admitted between 1 July 2013 and 31 October 2013 (4 months) was monitored and analysed...
July 2017: Intensive Care Medicine
Dominic Dellweg, Karina Reissig, Ekkehard Hoehn, Karsten Siemon, Peter Haidl
BACKGROUND: This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) added to rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who remain hypercapnic and use non-invasive ventilation after successful weaning. METHODS: Patients received rehabilitation and were randomized to inspiratory muscle or sham training for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was distance walked within 6 min. Secondary outcomes were inspiratory muscle strength, endurance, lung function, and blood gas levels...
February 2017: Respiratory Medicine
Louise Rose, Neill Kj Adhikari, David Leasa, Dean A Fergusson, Douglas McKim
BACKGROUND: There are various reasons why weaning and extubation failure occur, but ineffective cough and secretion retention can play a significant role. Cough augmentation techniques, such as lung volume recruitment or manually- and mechanically-assisted cough, are used to prevent and manage respiratory complications associated with chronic conditions, particularly neuromuscular disease, and may improve short- and long-term outcomes for people with acute respiratory failure. However, the role of cough augmentation to facilitate extubation and prevent post-extubation respiratory failure is unclear...
January 11, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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