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Immunomodulatory agents

Alessandra Bandera, Elisa Colella, Giuliano Rizzardini, Andrea Gori, Mario Clerici
Antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection reduces, but does not eliminate, viral replication and down modulates immune activation. The persistence of low level HIV replication in the host, nevertheless, drives a smouldering degree of immune activation that is observed throughout the natural history of disease and is the main driving force sustaining morbidity and mortality. Areas covered: Early start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and intensive management of behavioural risk factors are possible but, at best, marginally successful ways to manage immune activation...
October 20, 2016: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Balaji K Tamarappoo, Allan L Klein
Post-pericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) occurs in a subgroup of patients who have undergone cardiothoracic surgery and is characterized by fever, pleuritic pain, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion. It is associated with significant morbidity, and the leading complications include tamponade and constrictive pericarditis. Epidemiologic studies have found that PPS often occurs among younger patients; however, there is a lack of comprehensive risk stratification. It is therefore important to be able to identify patients who are at high risk for developing this disease...
November 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Chih-Yao Chung, Wen-Chin Yang, Chih-Lung Liang, Hsien-Yueh Liu, Shih-Kai Lai, Cicero Lee-Tian Chang
Cytopiloyne (CP), a novel polyacetylene compound extracted from B. pilosa, shows a multi-bioactivity, including immunomodulatory and antidiabetes. Here, we investigated the anti-Listeria effect of cytopiloyne in mice by assessing mortality, clearance of L. monocytogenes, and pathology examination. The data presented herein are supplemental to our research article entitled "Cytopiloyne, a polyacetylenic glucoside from Bidens pilosa, acts as a novel anticandidial agent via regulation of macrophages" [1].
June 2016: Data in Brief
Sheikh Mohammad Fazle Akbar, Mamun Al-Mahtab, Md Sakilur Islam Khan, Ruksana Raihan, Ananta Shrestha
Although several antiviral drugs are now available for treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), sustained off-treatment clinical responses and containment of CHB-related complications are not achieved in majority of CHB patients by antiviral therapy. In addition, use of these drugs is endowed with substantial long term risk of viral resistance and drug toxicity. The infinite treatment regimens of antiviral drugs for CHB patients are also costly and usually unbearable by most patients of developing and resource-constrained countries...
September 2016: Annals of Translational Medicine
Rocío López-Posadas, Cristina Mascaraque, Raquel González, María D Suárez, Antonio Zarzuelo, Olga Martínez-Augustin, Fermín Sánchez de Medina
BACKGROUND: Statins have antiinflammatory effects at the cardiovascular level because of inhibition of prenylation, which also probably underlies their therapeutic effects in preclinical models of inflammatory bowel disease. Another inhibitor of prenylation, namely alendronate, reduces colitis in rodents. In this study, we aim to explore the therapeutic potential of second-generation, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates in 3 preclinical models of colitis. METHODS: The trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and dextran sulfate sodium models of rat colitis and the adoptive lymphocyte transfer model of colitis in mice were used...
November 2016: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
R Lin, Q Wang, B Qi, Y Huang, G Yang
Neuromedin S (NMS), a 36-amino acid neuropeptide, has been found to be involved in the regulation of the endocrine activity. It has been also detected in immune tissues in mammals, what suggests that NMS may play an important role in the regulation of immune response. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the presence of NMS receptor 1 (NMU1R) and effect of NMS in pig splenic lymphocytes (SPLs) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). The presence of NMU1R in pig SPLs and PAMs was respectively confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunocytochemical methods...
September 1, 2016: Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences
Varun K Phadke, Rachel J Friedman-Moraco, Brian C Quigley, Alton B Farris, J P Norvell
BACKGROUND: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. METHODS: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Jlenia Brunetti, Giulia Roscia, Ilaria Lampronti, Roberto Gambari, Leila Quercini, Chiara Falciani, Luisa Bracci, Alessandro Pini
The synthetic antimicrobial peptide SET-M33 has strong activity against bacterial infections due to Gram-negative bacteria. It is currently in preclinical development as a new drug to treat lung infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Here we report its strong anti-inflammatory activity in terms of reduced expression of a number of cytokines, enzymes and signal transduction factors involved in inflammation triggered by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. Sixteen cytokines and other major agents involved in inflammation were analyzed in macrophages and bronchial cells after stimulation with LPS and incubation with SET-M33...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Héloïse M Delagrèverie, Constance Delaugerre, Sharon R Lewin, Steven G Deeks, Jonathan Z Li
In chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, long-lived latently infected cells are the major barrier to virus eradication and functional cure. Several therapeutic strategies to perturb, eliminate, and/or control this reservoir are now being pursued in the clinic. These strategies include latency reversal agents (LRAs) designed to reactivate HIV-1 ribonucleic acid transcription and virus production and a variety of immune-modifying drugs designed to reverse latency, block homeostatic proliferation, and replenish the viral reservoir, eliminate virus-producing cells, and/or control HIV replication after cessation of antiretroviral therapy...
October 2016: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
Jeffrey D Cooney, Ricardo C T Aguiar
Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibition restores the suppressive effects of cyclic-AMP in lymphocytes. In this concise review, we detail how PDE4 inhibition downmodulates the B-cell receptor (BCR)-related kinases SYK and PI3K, inhibits VEGFA secretion by tumor cells, inducing cancer cell apoptosis and blocking angiogenesis in the microenvironment. We describe the successful clinical repurposing of PDE4 inhibitors in B-cell malignancies, and propose that given their anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory activity, these agents will suppress BCR signals without the toxicity associated with other targeted biological doublets...
October 18, 2016: Blood
Wimonrat Panpetch, Jennifer K Spinler, James Versalovic, Somying Tumwasorn
BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL)-8 is the key agent for initiating an inflammatory response to infection with Helicobacter pylori. Some strains of Lactobacillus spp. are known to colonize the stomach and suppress inflammation caused by H. pylori. In this study, we characterized two gastric-derived lactobacilli, Lactobacillus salivarius (LS) strains B37 and B60, capable of inhibiting H. pylori-induced IL-8 production by gastric epithelial cells. RESULTS: Conditioned media from LS-B37 and LS-B60 suppressed H...
October 18, 2016: BMC Microbiology
A K S Salama, S J Moschos
BACKGROUND: Cancers escape immune surveillance via distinct mechanisms that involve central (negative selection within the thymus) or peripheral (lack of costimulation, receipt of death/anergic signals by tumor, immunoregulatory cell populations) immune tolerance. During the 1990s, moderate clinical benefit was seen using several cytokine therapies for a limited number of cancers. Over the past 20 years, extensive research has been performed to understand the role of various components of peripheral immune tolerance, with the co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death 1 (PD-1), and its ligand (PD-L1) being the most well characterized at preclinical and clinical levels...
October 13, 2016: Annals of Oncology: Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
Gera D Te Raa, Arnon P Kater
Despite the availability of novel targeted agents, TP53 defects remain the most important adverse prognostic factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Detection of deletion of TP53 locus (17p deletion) by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has become standard and performed prior to every line of treatment as the incidence dramatically increases as relapses occur. As monoallelic mutations of TP53 equally affect outcome, novel methods are being developed to improve detection of TP53 defects and include next-generation sequencing (NGS) and functional assays...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Birsen Doğu, Nurhan Atilla, Gözde Yıldırım Çetin, Nezir Yılmaz, Hafize Öksüz
Drug-induced pulmonary disease is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who present with respiratory symptoms. We report a patient with RA who developed acute respiratory failure two weeks after the administration of abatacept. The clinical findings were consistent with drug-induced acute respiratory failure, most likely acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Pulse steroid was administered at 1000 mg/kg/day in the emergency department. Chest X-ray and arterial blood gas values revealed significant improvement on the second day of hospitalization...
September 2016: Eur J Rheumatol
D L Fink, L Hedley, R F Miller
Biologic therapies are injectable immunomodulatory agents directed against specific immune cell or chemical targets. They have transformed the lives of HIV-uninfected individuals with severe inflammatory conditions including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. The perceived increased infection risk associated with these agents means that HIV-infected individuals have not been included in randomised control trials of these drugs. The literature for use of biologic therapies in HIV-infected populations is limited to case reports and case series...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of STD & AIDS
Ruihe Lin, Jingli Cai, Eric W Kostuk, Robert Rosenwasser, Lorraine Iacovitti
BACKGROUND: Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), working via its metabolite monomethylfumarate (MMF), acts as a potent antioxidant and immunomodulator in animal models of neurologic disease and in patients with multiple sclerosis. These properties and their translational potential led us to investigate whether DMF/MMF could also protect at-risk and/or dying neurons in models of ischemic stroke in vitro and in vivo. Although the antioxidant effects have been partially addressed, the benefits of DMF immunomodulation after ischemic stroke still need to be explored...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Da Hye Kwon, Ji Min Cheon, Eun-Ok Choi, Jin Woo Jeong, Ki Won Lee, Ki Young Kim, Sung Goo Kim, Suhkmann Kim, Su Hyun Hong, Cheol Park, Hye-Jin Hwang, Yung Hyun Choi
BACKGROUND: Immunoregulatory elements have emerged as useful immunotherapeutic agents against cancer. In traditional medicine, Mori folium, the leaf of Morus alba L. (Moraceae), has been used for various medicinal purposes; however, the immunomodulatory effects have not been fully identified. We evaluated the immunoenhancing potential of water extract of Mori folium (WEMF) in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. METHODS: RAW264.7 cells were treated with WEMF for 24 hours and cell viability was detected by an MTT method...
September 2016: Journal of Cancer Prevention
Amy L Clark, Fumihiko Urano
Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells, leading to insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. Although multiple attempts have been made to slow the autoimmune process using immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agents, there are still no effective treatments that can delay or reverse the progression of type 1 diabetes in humans. Recent studies support endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a novel target for preventing the initiation of the autoimmune reaction, propagation of inflammation, and β cell death in type 1 diabetes...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Immunology
Lamia Ysmail-Dahlouk, Wafa Nouari, Mourad Aribi
BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with an imbalance between inflammation and repair. Recently, the biologically active form of vitamin D3, i.e. 1,25(OH)2D3, has been reported to have potent immunomodulatory effects on both innate and adaptive immune cells, as well as on the production of their specific cytokines. METHODS: We examined the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on the production of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 and anti-inflammatory Th2/Treg related cytokines, as well as on the phosphorylation of monocyte-expressed STAT4 and STAT6 at the recent-onset human T1D...
October 4, 2016: Immunology Letters
Romain Daillère, Marie Vétizou, Nadine Waldschmitt, Takahiro Yamazaki, Christophe Isnard, Vichnou Poirier-Colame, Connie P M Duong, Caroline Flament, Patricia Lepage, Maria Paula Roberti, Bertrand Routy, Nicolas Jacquelot, Lionel Apetoh, Sonia Becharef, Sylvie Rusakiewicz, Philippe Langella, Harry Sokol, Guido Kroemer, David Enot, Antoine Roux, Alexander Eggermont, Eric Tartour, Ludger Johannes, Paul-Louis Woerther, Elisabeth Chachaty, Jean-Charles Soria, Encouse Golden, Silvia Formenti, Magdalena Plebanski, Mutsa Madondo, Philip Rosenstiel, Didier Raoult, Vincent Cattoir, Ivo Gomperts Boneca, Mathias Chamaillard, Laurence Zitvogel
The efficacy of the anti-cancer immunomodulatory agent cyclophosphamide (CTX) relies on intestinal bacteria. How and which relevant bacterial species are involved in tumor immunosurveillance, and their mechanism of action are unclear. Here, we identified two bacterial species, Enterococcus hirae and Barnesiella intestinihominis that are involved during CTX therapy. Whereas E. hirae translocated from the small intestine to secondary lymphoid organs and increased the intratumoral CD8/Treg ratio, B. intestinihominis accumulated in the colon and promoted the infiltration of IFN-γ-producing γδT cells in cancer lesions...
September 28, 2016: Immunity
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