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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705121/dysbiosis-of-gut-microbiota-and-microbial-metabolites-in-parkinson-s-disease
#1
REVIEW
Meng-Fei Sun, Yan-Qin Shen
Gut microbial dysbiosis and alteration of microbial metabolites in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been increasingly reported. Dysbiosis in the composition and abundance of gut microbiota can affect both the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system (CNS), indicating the existence of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and thereby causing CNS diseases. Disturbance of the microbiota-gut-brain axis has been linked to specific microbial products that are related to gut inflammation and neuroinflammation. Future directions should therefore focus on the exploration of specific gut microbes or microbial metabolites that contribute to the development of PD...
April 26, 2018: Ageing Research Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29581954/influence-of-altered-gut-microbiota-composition-on-aging-and-aging-related-diseases
#2
REVIEW
Jeonghyun Choi, Tai-Young Hur, Yonggeun Hong
The gut microbiota forms a large community that coexists with all species, including humans and rodents. Genome projects have been conducted by many researchers in nearly every country to better understand and treat diseases that lead to death in humans. However, the gut microbiota is known as a "second genome" because it includes microbes, genomic DNA, proteins, and metabolites. A large number of studies have revealed the importance of the gut microbiota. In elderly people, the diversity of the gut microbiota is reduced and there is an increased incidence of degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, and decreased cognitive and memory functions...
January 2018: Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29552561/of-microbes-and-minds-a-narrative-review-on-the-second-brain-aging
#3
REVIEW
Riccardo Calvani, Anna Picca, Maria Rita Lo Monaco, Francesco Landi, Roberto Bernabei, Emanuele Marzetti
In recent years, an extensive body of literature focused on the gut-brain axis and the possible role played by the gut microbiota in modulating brain morphology and function from birth to old age. Gut microbiota has been proposed as a relevant player during the early phases of neurodevelopment, with possible long-standing effects in later life. The reduction in gut microbiota diversity has also become one of the hallmarks of aging, and disturbances in its composition are associated with several (age-related) neurological conditions, including depression, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease...
2018: Frontiers in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29380643/gut-microbiota-modulates-type-i-interferon-and-antibody-mediated-immune-responses-in-chickens-infected-with-influenza-virus-subtype-h9n2
#4
A Yitbarek, T Alkie, K Taha-Abdelaziz, J Astill, J C Rodriguez-Lecompte, J Parkinson, É Nagy, S Sharif
Commensal gut microbes play a critical role in shaping host defences against pathogens, including influenza viruses. The current study was conducted to assess the role and mechanisms of action of commensal gut microbiota on the innate and antibody-mediated responses of layer chickens against influenza virus subtype H9N2. A total of 104 one-day-old specific pathogen free chickens were assigned to either of the four treatments, which included two levels of antibiotics treatment (ABX- and ABX+) and two levels of H9N2 virus infection (H9N2- and H9N2+)...
April 25, 2018: Beneficial Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29340928/microbiota-signaling-pathways-that-influence-neurologic-disease
#5
REVIEW
Laura M Cox, Howard L Weiner
Though seemingly distinct and autonomous, emerging evidence suggests there is a bidirectional interaction between the intestinal microbiota and the brain. This crosstalk may play a substantial role in neurologic diseases, including anxiety, depression, autism, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and, potentially, Alzheimer's disease. Long hypothesized by Metchnikoff and others well over 100 years ago, investigations into the mind-microbe axis is now seeing a rapid resurgence of research. If specific pathways and mechanisms of interaction are understood, it could have broad therapeutic potential, as the microbiome is environmentally acquired and can be modified to promote health...
January 16, 2018: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220570/neuromicrobiology-how-microbes-influence-the-brain
#6
Cesar de la Fuente-Nunez, Beatriz Torres Meneguetti, Octávio Luiz Franco, Timothy K Lu
We review here recent discoveries in the exciting new field of neuromicrobiology. This field encompasses the interactions between the microbiome and the central nervous system. The microbiome has a tremendous impact on human health. In particular, the gut microbiota may play a key role in many essential processes in health and disease via the activity of the gut-brain axis, possibly contributing to autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and anxiety disorder. Gut microbes may also be involved in nociception, complex host behaviors, and brain development...
February 21, 2018: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29201595/microbes-tickling-your-tummy-the-importance-of-the-gut-brain-axis-in-parkinson-s-disease
#7
REVIEW
Paula Perez-Pardo, Mitch Hartog, Johan Garssen, Aletta D Kraneveld
Purpose of Review: Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) are known to experience gastrointestinal dysfunction that might precede the onset of motor symptoms by several years. Evidence suggests an important role of the gut-brain axis in PD pathogenesis. These interactions might be essentially influenced by the gut microbiota. Here, we review recent findings supporting that changes in the gut microbiota composition might be a trigger for inflammation contributing to neurodegeneration in PD...
2017: Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28843021/the-nasal-and-gut-microbiome-in-parkinson-s-disease-and-idiopathic-rapid-eye-movement-sleep-behavior-disorder
#8
Anna Heintz-Buschart, Urvashi Pandey, Tamara Wicke, Friederike Sixel-Döring, Annette Janzen, Elisabeth Sittig-Wiegand, Claudia Trenkwalder, Wolfgang H Oertel, Brit Mollenhauer, Paul Wilmes
BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence connects the gut microbiota and the onset and/or phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD). Differences in the abundances of specific bacterial taxa have been reported in PD patients. It is, however, unknown whether these differences can be observed in individuals at high risk, for example, with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, a prodromal condition of α-synuclein aggregation disorders including PD. OBJECTIVES: To compare microbiota in carefully preserved nasal wash and stool samples of subjects with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, manifest PD, and healthy individuals...
January 2018: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808780/non-cns-pathogenic-origin-of-parkinson-s-disease
#9
Humdoon Choudhry, Lawrence C Perlmuter
The gut with its variety of microbiota may serve as an etiological origin of diseases. Gut microbes may also play a role in the pathogenesis of diseases beyond their simple nutritional maintenance and support. For example, gut protein aggregation, possibly aided by microbes as well as nasal influences, might be linked to disease that may move to the brain through the vagus nerve. To this end, Braak has offered a "dual-hit" hypothesis that proposes a novel etiology for Parkinson's disease (PD). The hypothesis places the initial origin of the disease in the nose and the gastrointestinal tract (GI) after infection by an unknown pathogen that could aggregate in the gut and then eventually spread to the brain via the autonomic plexuses...
September 2017: Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783713/aging-and-sarcopenia-associate-with-specific-interactions-between-gut-microbes-serum-biomarkers-and-host-physiology-in-rats
#10
Jay Siddharth, Anirikh Chakrabarti, Alice Pannérec, Sonia Karaz, Delphine Morin-Rivron, Mojgan Masoodi, Jerome N Feige, Scott James Parkinson
The microbiome has been demonstrated to play an integral role in the maintenance of many aspects of health that are also associated with aging. In order to identify areas of potential exploration and intervention, we simultaneously characterized age-related alterations in gut microbiome, muscle physiology and serum proteomic and lipidomic profiles in aged rats to define an integrated signature of the aging phenotype. We demonstrate that aging skews the composition of the gut microbiome, in particular by altering the Sutterella to Barneseilla ratio, and alters the metabolic potential of intestinal bacteria...
July 17, 2017: Aging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676349/immunoregulatory-effect-of-mast-cells-influenced-by-microbes-in-neurodegenerative-diseases
#11
REVIEW
Francesco Girolamo, Cristiana Coppola, Domenico Ribatti
When related to central nervous system (CNS) health and disease, brain mast cells (MCs) can be a source of either beneficial or deleterious signals acting on neural cells. We review the current state of knowledge about molecular interactions between MCs and glia in neurodegenerative diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy. We also discuss the influence on MC actions evoked by the host microbiota, which has a profound effect on the host immune system, inducing important consequences in neurodegenerative disorders...
October 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220542/the-gut-microbiome-in-human-neurological-disease-a-review
#12
REVIEW
Helen Tremlett, Kylynda C Bauer, Silke Appel-Cresswell, Brett B Finlay, Emmanuelle Waubant
Almost half the cells and 1% of the unique genes found in our bodies are human, the rest are from microbes, predominantly bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses. These microorganisms collectively form the human microbiota, with most colonizing the gut. Recent technological advances, open access data libraries, and application of high-throughput sequencing have allowed these microbes to be identified and their contribution to neurological health to be examined. Emerging evidence links perturbations in the gut microbiota to neurological disease, including disease risk, activity, and progression...
March 2017: Annals of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27981980/gut-microbiota-dysbiosis-motor-deficits-and-neuroinflammation-in-a-model-of-parkinson-s-disease
#13
(no author information available yet)
'Signals from gut microbes are required for the neuroinflammatory responses...in Parkinson's disease.'
December 16, 2016: British Dental Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754286/br-07-1-development-of-the-cell-microarray-for-high-throughput-analysis-of-gut-microbiota
#14
Seong-Tshool Hong
The human intestine contains a massive and complex microbial community called gut microbiota. A typical human carries 100 trillion microbes in his/her body which is 10 times greater than the number of their host cells, i.e. whole number of human cells. A combined microbial genome constituting gut microbiota is well excess our own human genome. The microbial composition of gut microbiotata and its role on diseases became a booming area of research, presenting a new paradigm of opportunities for modern medicines...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643284/br-07-1-development-of-the-cell-microarray-for-high-throughput-analysis-of-gut-microbiota
#15
Seong-Tshool Hong
The human intestine contains a massive and complex microbial community called gut microbiota. A typical human carries 100 trillion microbes in his/her body which is 10 times greater than the number of their host cells, i.e. whole number of human cells. A combined microbial genome constituting gut microbiota is well excess our own human genome. The microbial composition of gut microbiotata and its role on diseases became a booming area of research, presenting a new paradigm of opportunities for modern medicines...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25847918/leaky-intestine-and-impaired-microbiome-in-an-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-mouse-model
#16
Shaoping Wu, Jianxun Yi, Yong-Guo Zhang, Jingsong Zhou, Jun Sun
Emerging evidence has demonstrated that intestinal homeostasis and the microbiome play essential roles in neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Currently, there is no effective treatment. Most patients die within 3-5 years due to respiratory paralysis. Although the death of motor neurons is a hallmark of ALS, other organs may also contribute to the disease progression...
April 2015: Physiological Reports
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