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Anne Lelièvre, Stéphane Gérard, Sophie Hermabessière, Monique Martinez, Bruno Péran, Yves Rolland
Confronted with the growing incidence of age-related pathologies and the limits of so-called traditional medicine oriented towards the prescribing of medicines, non-pharmacological approaches have grown considerably in the geriatric community. A literature review focused on the therapeutic benefit of humour, laughter and the use of clowns on the physical and psychological health of elderly people.
March 2018: Soins. Gérontologie
Neepa Patel, Hannah Combs, Michele York, Cecile Phan, Joohi Jimenez-Shahed
Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is a syndrome of affective disturbance associated with inappropriate laughter and crying, independent of mood. PBA is common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and increasingly recognized in Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism (aP). Correlates of PBA have not been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive and psychiatric comorbidities correlated with patient-reported symptoms of PBA by using the Center for Neurological Study-Lability Scale among patients with ALS, PD, and aP...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Karl-Heinz Renner, Leonie Manthey
Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at) and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others) are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others) in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Usama Bin Zubair, Humza Mumtaz, Sawera Mansoor
Profound deafness is a lifelong impairment, leading to the physical disability as well as poor psychological adjustment. We herein present a mental health disorder rarely seen among the patients of profound deafness. A 16-year deaf and dumb girl, previously treated for depression, presented with unusual laughter, irritability, flight of ideas, decreased sleep, ideas of self importance, and decreased social functioning and educational performance. These problems were understood by the parents via sign language, who interpreted them to the interviewer...
March 2018: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
Fabio Pizza, Elena Antelmi, Stefano Vandi, Stefano Meletti, Roberto Erro, Christian R Baumann, Kailash P Bhatia, Yves Dauvilliers, Mark J Edwards, Alex Iranzo, Sebastiaan Overeem, Michele Tinazzi, Rocco Liguori, Giuseppe Plazzi
Objectives: To describe the motor pattern of cataplexy and to determine its phenomenological differences from pseudocataplexy in the differential diagnosis of episodic falls. Methods: We selected 30 video recorded cataplexy and 21 pseudocataplexy attacks in 17 and 10 patients evaluated for suspected narcolepsy and with final diagnosis of narcolepsy type 1 and conversion disorder respectively, together with self-reported attacks features, and asked expert neurologists to blindly evaluate the motor features of the attacks...
February 7, 2018: Sleep
Sara K Kaylor, Haley P Strickland, Andrea F Sartain
This article describes an innovative approach to patient teaching using standardized patients, humor, and therapeutic communication. The strategy was designed for baccalaureate students enrolled in a fundamentals nursing course. Students, divided into small groups, were assigned a patient education topic to provide to the standardized patient. Student and faculty feedback indicated positive responses to this instructional strategy. Utilization of this learner-centered teaching environment to promote therapeutic communication during a complex patient-teaching scenario was found to be beneficial for novice nursing students...
January 24, 2018: Nursing Education Perspectives
J Avez-Couturier, S Joriot, S Peudenier, D Juzeau
Management of pain is one of the major expectations of children with neurological impairment and their families. The medical literature is poor on this topic accounting for approximately 0.15 % of the publications on pain in general. The objective of the French Pediatric Neurology Society was to review the current knowledge on this topic. Bibliographic research was conducted with PubMed and RefDoc for publications between 1994 and 2014 in French or English. A total of 925 articles were retrieved and 92 were selected for review...
January 2018: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Barbara Wild
Humor and laughter are integral parts of human life and communication - and so of course they occur in medical contacts.Humor is defined as a personality based cognitive emotional style of processing situations, characterized by the ability to find positive aspects even in negative situations, and the ability to communicate this point of view to others and to cheer them up. Humor can support healing processes and coping with illness. Humor and jokes reduce anxiety and stress (for patients and doctors). Humorous people have a more realistic, flexible and less fearful behaviour...
December 2017: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
Willibald Ruch, Tracey Platt, Richard Bruntsch, Róbert Ďurka
This study examines whether coding open answers in a picture-based test, as to the extent they reflect the fear of being laughed at (i.e., gelotophobia), demonstrates sufficient validity to construct a semi-projective test for the assessment of gelotophobia. Previous findings indicate that cartoon stimuli depicting laughter situations (i.e., in the pilot version of the Picture-Geloph; Ruch et al., 2009) on average elicit fear-typical responses in gelotophobes stronger than in non-gelotophobes. The present study aims to (a) develop a standardized scoring procedure based on a coding scheme, and (b) examine the properties of the pilot version of the Picture-Geloph in order to select the most acceptable items for a standard form of the test...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
Marie Ritter, Disa A Sauter
Group membership is important for how we perceive others, but although perceivers can accurately infer group membership from facial expressions and spoken language, it is not clear whether listeners can identify in- and out-group members from non-verbal vocalizations. In the current study, we examined perceivers' ability to identify group membership from non-verbal vocalizations of laughter, testing the following predictions: (1) listeners can distinguish between laughter from different nationalities and (2) between laughter from their in-group, a close out-group, and a distant out-group, and (3) greater exposure to laughter from members of other cultural groups is associated with better performance...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
Mayumi Hirosaki, Tetsuya Ohira, Seiji Yasumura, Masaharu Maeda, Hirooki Yabe, Mayumi Harigane, Hideto Takahashi, Michio Murakami, Yuriko Suzuki, Hironori Nakano, Wen Zhang, Mayu Uemura, Masafumi Abe, Kenji Kamiya
PURPOSE: Although mental health problems such as depression after disasters have been reported, positive psychological factors after disasters have not been examined. Recently, the importance of positive affect to our health has been recognised. We therefore investigated the frequency of laughter and its related factors among residents of evacuation zones after the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study on 52,320 participants aged 20 years and older who were included in the Fukushima Health Management Survey in Japan's fiscal year 2012, associations of the frequency of laughter with changes in lifestyle after the disaster, such as a changed work situation, the number of family members, and the number of address changes, and other sociodemographic, psychological, and lifestyle factors were examined using logistic regression analysis...
December 2, 2017: Quality of Life Research
Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Chi Cheng, Kira Dies, Amelia Diplock, Danielle B Pier, Conor S Ryan, Brendan C Lanpher, Jennifer Hirst, Wendy K Chung, Mustafa Sahin, Elisabeth Rosser, Basil Darras, James T Bennett
The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration of the corticospinal and spinocerebellar tracts leading to progressive spasticity. One subtype, spastic paraplegia type 47 (SPG47 or HSP-AP4B1), is due to bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in the AP4B1 gene. AP4B1 is a subunit of the adapter protein complex 4 (AP-4), a heterotetrameric protein complex that regulates the transport of membrane proteins. Since 2011, 11 individuals from six families with AP4B1 mutations have been reported, nine of whom had homozygous mutations and were from consanguineous families...
February 2018: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Huihui Xu, Xing Ji, Yan Xu, Xiaoqing Liu, Jingmin Zhang, Yingwei Chen, Bing Xiao
OBJECTIVE: To explore the genetic cause for two familial Angelman syndrome cases and correlation between the clinical phenotypes and their genetic basis. METHODS: Karyotyping analysis and microarray assay were carried out to exclude chromosome anomalies and uniparental disomy. The UBE3A gene was analyzed for potential point mutations, deletions, insertions and splice site mutations. Reverse transcription PCR was used to evaluate splicing mutation of the RNA transcripts...
December 10, 2017: Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue za Zhi, Zhonghua Yixue Yichuanxue Zazhi, Chinese Journal of Medical Genetics
Joshua Raclaw, Cecilia E Ford
In this paper we focus on how participants in peer review interactions use laughter as a resource as they publicly report divergence of evaluative positions, divergence that is typical in the give and take of joint grant evaluation. Using the framework of conversation analysis, we examine the infusion of laughter and multimodal laugh-relevant practices into sequences of talk in meetings of grant reviewers deliberating on the evaluation and scoring of high-level scientific grant applications. We focus on a recurrent sequence in these meetings, what we call the score-reporting sequence , in which the assigned reviewers first announce the preliminary scores they have assigned to the grant...
May 2017: Journal of Pragmatics
Irene Hatzipapas, Maretha J Visser, Estie Janse van Rensburg
The study explores the experiences of volunteer community care workers working with HIV-affected families, participating in laughter therapy. Laughter therapy is being used as an intervention to positively influence individuals experiencing various forms of emotional distress. Community care workers play a vital role in the support of the HIV/AIDS-infected and -affected members in communities. The nature of this type of work and their limited training contributes to high levels of secondary trauma and emotional exhaustion...
December 2017: SAHARA J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance
Mohamed H Noureldein, Assaad A Eid
AIMS: Laughter has been used for centuries to alleviate pain in morbid conditions. It was not until 1976 that scientists thought about laughter as a form of therapy that can modulate hormonal and immunological parameters that affect the outcome of many serious diseases. Moreover, laughter therapy was shown to be beneficial in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by delaying the onset of many diabetic complications. Laughter is also described to influence the cardiovascular and endothelial functions and thus may protect against diabetic cardiovascular complications...
January 2018: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Salina K Chhokar, Lory Laughter, Dorothy J Rowe
Purpose: Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is an inexpensive, non-invasive, antimicrobial liquid used to treat carious lesions and decrease sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of registered dental hygienists in alternative practice (RDHAP) regarding the use of SDF to treat dental caries.Methods: A 16-item survey designed to evaluate RDHAP's familiarity and perceptions of SDF was electronically distributed to 222 RDHAPs practicing in the state of California. A survey research software program collected and tabulated responses, calculated response frequencies for each survey item, and determined statistical relationships among variables, using cross tabulation analysis...
August 2017: Journal of Dental Hygiene: JDH
Emily Zane, Kayla Neumeyer, Julia Mertens, Amanda Chugg, Ruth B Grossman
Research into emotional responsiveness in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has yielded mixed findings. Some studies report uniform, flat and emotionless expressions in ASD; others describe highly variable expressions that are as or even more intense than those of typically developing (TD) individuals. Variability in findings is likely due to differences in study design: some studies have examined posed (i.e., not spontaneous expressions) and others have examined spontaneous expressions in social contexts, during which individuals with ASD-by nature of the disorder-are likely to behave differently than their TD peers...
October 10, 2017: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Sara N Reggie, Krishna Kalyam, John B Holds, Sophia M Chung
BACKGROUND: To report a patient with silent sinus syndrome (SSS) who experienced transient ipsilateral monocular vision loss during intense laughter. METHODS: Case report. RESULTS: Our patient's transient vision loss completely resolved after maxillary sinus decompression and during 7 months of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Although the precise mechanism of our patient's vision loss remains undetermined, we suspect that the vascular supply to the eye and/or the optic nerve was compromised as the result of the combination of laughter (causing Valsalva maneuver and increased intrathoracic pressure) and SSS...
October 4, 2017: Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology: the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
Toshio Machida, Yoshinori Higuchi, Shigeki Nakano, Satoshi Ishige, Junichiro Shimada, Koichi Honma
BACKGROUND: Hypotension is a significant risk factor for the development of ischemic complication following revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease (MMD). However, it is currently unknown whether autonomic dysfunction also plays a role. CASE DESCRIPTION: Here we report a case of MMD in which hypotension due to autonomic dysfunction caused postoperative cerebral ischemia. A 30-year-old female patient with MMD had a history of transient right hemiparesis following laughter...
January 2018: World Neurosurgery
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