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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29454999/long-term-treatment-with-green-tea-polyphenols-modifies-the-gut-microbiome-of-female-sprague-dawley-rats
#1
Jincheng Wang, Lili Tang, Hongyuan Zhou, Jun Zhou, Travis C Glenn, Chwan-Li Shen, Jia-Sheng Wang
Green tea polyphenols (GTP) have been shown to exert a spectrum of health benefits to animals and humans. It is plausible that the beneficial effects of GTP are a result of its interaction with the gut microbiota. This study evaluated the effect of long-term treatment with GTP on the gut microbiota of experimental rats and the potential linkage between changes of the gut microbiota with the beneficial effects of GTP. Six-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into three dosing regimens (0, 0...
January 31, 2018: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29449660/gut-microbiota-injury-in-allogeneic-haematopoietic-stem-cell-transplantation
#2
REVIEW
Yusuke Shono, Marcel R M van den Brink
Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered to be the strongest curative immunotherapy for various malignancies (primarily, but not limited to, haematologic malignancies). However, application of allo-HSCT is limited owing to its life-threatening major complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), relapse and infections. Recent advances in large-scale DNA sequencing technology have facilitated rapid identification of the microorganisms that make up the microbiota and evaluation of their interactions with host immunity in various diseases, including cancer...
February 16, 2018: Nature Reviews. Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446077/coffee-drinking-and-colorectal-cancer-and-its-subsites-a-pooled-analysis-of-8-cohort-studies-in-japan
#3
Ikuko Kashino, Shamima Akter, Tetsuya Mizoue, Norie Sawada, Ayaka Kotemori, Keitaro Matsuo, Isao Oze, Hidemi Ito, Mariko Naito, Tomio Nakayama, Yuri Kitamura, Akiko Tamakoshi, Ichiro Tsuji, Yumi Sugawara, Manami Inoue, Chisato Nagata, Atsuko Sadakane, Keitaro Tanaka, Shoichiro Tsugane, Taichi Shimazu
Coffee is a rich source of bioactive compounds that have potential anti-carcinogenic effects. However, it remains unclear whether coffee drinking is associated with colorectal cancer. Also, despite different etiological factors involved in gut physiology, few studies have investigated this association by anatomical site of the lesion. To address these issues, this study examined the association between coffee drinking and colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis from 8 cohort studies conducted in Japan. Among 320,322 participants followed up for 4,503,276 person-years, 6,711 incident colorectal cancer cases were identified...
February 15, 2018: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29441064/impact-of-cigarette-smoking-on-the-gastrointestinal-tract-inflammation-opposing-effects-in-crohn-s-disease-and-ulcerative-colitis
#4
REVIEW
Loni Berkowitz, Bárbara M Schultz, Geraldyne A Salazar, Catalina Pardo-Roa, Valentina P Sebastián, Manuel M Álvarez-Lobos, Susan M Bueno
Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for gastrointestinal disorders, such as peptic ulcer, Crohn's disease (CD), and several cancers. The mechanisms proposed to explain the role of smoking in these disorders include mucosal damage, changes in gut irrigation, and impaired mucosal immune response. Paradoxically, cigarette smoking is a protective factor for the development and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC and CD represent the two most important conditions of inflammatory bowel diseases, and share several clinical features...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29438479/novel-tn916-like-elements-confer-aminoglycoside-macrolide-co-resistance-in-clinical-isolates-of-streptococcus-gallolyticus-ssp-gallolyticus
#5
Stanimir Kambarev, Frédéric Pecorari, Stéphane Corvec
Background: Streptococcus gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus (Sgg) is a commensal bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen. In humans it has been clinically associated with the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and epidemiologically recognized as an emerging cause of infective endocarditis (IE). The standard therapy of Sgg includes the administration of a penicillin in combination with an aminoglycoside. Even though penicillin-resistant isolates have still not been reported, epidemiological studies have shown that this microbe is a reservoir of multiple acquired genes, conferring resistance to tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, macrolides and glycopeptides...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29437871/gut-microbiota-modulate-t-cell-trafficking-into-human-colorectal-cancer
#6
Eleonora Cremonesi, Valeria Governa, Jesus Francisco Glaus Garzon, Valentina Mele, Francesca Amicarella, Manuele Giuseppe Muraro, Emanuele Trella, Virginie Galati-Fournier, Daniel Oertli, Silvio Raffael Däster, Raoul A Droeser, Benjamin Weixler, Martin Bolli, Raffaele Rosso, Ulrich Nitsche, Nina Khanna, Adrian Egli, Simone Keck, Julia Slotta-Huspenina, Luigi M Terracciano, Paul Zajac, Giulio Cesare Spagnoli, Serenella Eppenberger-Castori, Klaus-Peter Janssen, Lubor Borsig, Giandomenica Iezzi
OBJECTIVE: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. DESIGN: Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues...
February 6, 2018: Gut
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29437527/first-victim-later-aggressor-how-the-intestinal-microbiota-drives-the-pro-inflammatory-effects-of-dietary-emulsifiers
#7
Emilie Viennois, Benoit Chassaing
The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large and diverse community of bacteria, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Composed of 500-1000 distinct species, the intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immunity and metabolism. However, alterations in its composition are associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases including obesity, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Among many other factors, our diet impacts microbiota composition and function, in either beneficial or detrimental ways...
February 13, 2018: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29434315/association-of-gut-microbial-communities-with-plasma-lipopolysaccharide-binding-protein-lbp-in-premenopausal-women
#8
Jessica S Citronberg, Keith R Curtis, Emily White, Polly A Newcomb, Katherine Newton, Charlotte Atkinson, Xiaoling Song, Johanna W Lampe, Meredith Aj Hullar
The mechanisms by which obesity increases cancer risk are unclear, but some lines of evidence suggest that gut microbial communities (GMC) may contribute to chronic inflammation in obese individuals through raised systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We evaluated associations of the GMC in stool with plasma LPS-binding protein (LBP, a measure of LPS) and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in 110 premenopausal women in the United States. Diet was assessed using 3-day food records and GMCs were evaluated using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene...
February 12, 2018: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29430336/influence-of-bile-acids-on-colorectal-cancer-risk-potential-mechanisms-mediated-by-diet-gut-microbiota-interactions
#9
Sören Ocvirk, Stephen Jd O'Keefe
Purpose of review: To review the evidence for the tumorigenic effects of food-stimulated bile acids on the colon and interaction with the gut microbiota. Recent Findings: High-fat diets promote the hepatic synthesis of bile acids and increase their delivery to the colonic lumen. Here, they stimulate the growth and activity of 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, which convert primary into secondary bile acids that show tumorigenic activity, especially deoxycholic acid (DCA)...
December 2017: Current Nutrition Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29429981/flora-ishing-guts-assist-cancer-immunotherapies
#10
Laurie S Davis
Gut bacteria influence patient response to cancer therapy.
February 2, 2018: Science Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29429965/mast-cells-promote-small-bowel-cancer-in-a-tumor-stage-specific-and-cytokine-dependent-manner
#11
Abdulrahman M Saadalla, Abu Osman, Michael F Gurish, Kristen L Dennis, Nichole R Blatner, Abdulmohammad Pezeshki, Kelly M McNagny, Hilde Cheroutre, Fotini Gounari, Khashayarsha Khazaie
Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident sentinels that mature and orchestrate inflammation in response to infection and allergy. While they are also frequently observed in tumors, the contribution of MCs to carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that sequential oncogenic events in gut epithelia expand different types of MCs in a temporal-, spatial-, and cytokine-dependent manner. The first wave of MCs expands focally in benign adenomatous polyps, which have elevated levels of IL-10, IL-13, and IL-33, and are rich in type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s)...
February 13, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29426058/the-metabolism-of-flubendazole-in-human-liver-and-cancer-cell-lines
#12
Lucie Raisová Stuchlíková, Věra Králová, Kateřina Lněničková, Tomáš Zárybnický, Petra Matoušková, Veronika Hanušová, Martin Ambrož, Zdeněk Šubrt, Lenka Skálová
Flubendazole (FLU), a benzimidazole anthelmintic drug widely used in veterinary medicine, has been approved for the treatment of gut-residing nematodes in humans. In addition, FLU is now considered a promising anticancer agent. Despite this, information about biotransformation of this compound in human is lacking. Moreover, there is no information regarding whether cancer cells are able to metabolize FLU in order to deactivate it. For these reasons, the present study was designed to identify all metabolites of Phase I and Phase II of FLU in human liver and in various cancer cells using UHPLC/MS/MS analysis...
February 9, 2018: Drug Testing and Analysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29425888/understanding-the-microbiome-emerging-biomarkers-for-exploiting-the-microbiota-for-personalized-medicine-against-cancer
#13
REVIEW
Meenakshi Rajpoot, Anil K Sharma, Anil Sharma, Girish Kumar Gupta
The human body is a home to more than 1 trillion microbes with a diverse variety of commensal microbes that play a crucial role towards the health of the individual. These microbes occupy different habitats such as gut, skin, vagina, oral etc. Not only the types and abundance of microbes are different in different organs, but also these may differ in different individuals. The genome of these microbiota and their ecosystem constitute to form a microbiome. Factors such as diet, environment, host genetics etc...
February 6, 2018: Seminars in Cancer Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29421872/a-perspective-of-advanced-glycation-endproducts-ages-on-human-health
#14
Jer-An Lin, Chi-Hao Wu, Gow-Chin Yen
In the last 20 years, the effects of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) on health have received increasing attention. High AGE levels in the body correlate with the progression of many diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. However, whether AGEs are a cause of these diseases or represent accompanying symptoms of these diseases still needs to be elucidated by more comprehensive research. Recently, many researchers have begun to investigate the effects of AGE intake-induced variations of gut microbiota on disease progression, which will further explain the impact of AGEs on health and open a new chapter in AGE research...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420993/glucagon-like-peptide-2-improves-intestinal-immune-function-and-diminishes-bacterial-translocation-in-a-mouse-model-of-parenteral-nutrition
#15
Qiucheng Lei, Jingcheng Bi, Huanwei Chen, Feng Tian, Xuejin Gao, Ning Li, Xinying Wang
Parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with increased infectious risks due to impaired intestinal immunity. Although glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) enhances the gut barrier function, it is uncertain whether it improves mucosal immunologic barrier function. We hypothesized that injecting the PN mouse model with GLP-2 improved innate and acquired immunity, and prevented bacterial translocation. Forty-eight hours after venous cannulation, male Institute of Cancer Research mice were randomly divided into 3 groups based on their diet: chow with saline (n = 10), PN (n = 9), or PN + GLP-2 (30 μg bid per mouse, n = 10) provided for 5 days...
January 2018: Nutrition Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420293/patients-with-familial-adenomatous-polyposis-harbor-colonic-biofilms-containing-tumorigenic-bacteria
#16
Christine M Dejea, Payam Fathi, John M Craig, Annemarie Boleij, Rahwa Taddese, Abby L Geis, Xinqun Wu, Christina E DeStefano Shields, Elizabeth M Hechenbleikner, David L Huso, Robert A Anders, Francis M Giardiello, Elizabeth C Wick, Hao Wang, Shaoguang Wu, Drew M Pardoll, Franck Housseau, Cynthia L Sears
Individuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacterial biofilms composed predominately of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis Genes for colibactin (clbB) and Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft), encoding secreted oncotoxins, were highly enriched in FAP patients' colonic mucosa compared to healthy individuals...
February 2, 2018: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420166/curcumin-mediated-regulation-of-intestinal-barrier-function-the-mechanism-underlying-its-beneficial-effects
#17
Siddhartha S Ghosh, Hongliang He, Jing Wang, Todd W Gehr, Shobha Ghosh
Curcumin has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties established largely by in vitro studies. Accordingly, oral administration of curcumin beneficially modulates many diseases including diabetes, fatty-liver disease, atherosclerosis, arthritis, cancer and neurological disorders such as depression, Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. However, limited bioavailability and inability to detect curcumin in circulation or target tissues has hindered the validation of a causal role. We established curcumin-mediated decrease in the release of gut bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into circulation by maintaining the integrity of the intestinal barrier function as the mechanism underlying the attenuation of metabolic diseases (diabetes, atherosclerosis, kidney disease) by curcumin supplementation precluding the need for curcumin absorption...
January 8, 2018: Tissue Barriers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29411013/gut-microbes-may-shape-response-to-cancer-immunotherapy
#18
Tracy Hampton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 6, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29410981/diet-and-microbiota-linked-in-health-and-disease
#19
REVIEW
T Requena, M C Martínez-Cuesta, C Peláez
Diet has shaped microbiota profiles through human evolution. Traditional gut microbiomes are described to be driven by high levels of Prevotella. In the present, however, it is consistently described a lower microbial richness in urban industrialized populations compared with individuals living in rural settings, Bacteroides being predominant among urban-industrial gut microbiomes. Components of diet are highly influential in shaping the gut microbiota, being fiber, fat, proteins, polyphenols and micronutrients differentially metabolized by generalist and specialized microorganisms alone or through the phenomenon of cross-feeding...
February 7, 2018: Food & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29410406/cryo-em-structure-of-5-ht3a-receptor-in-its-resting-conformation
#20
Sandip Basak, Yvonne Gicheru, Amrita Samanta, Sudheer Kumar Molugu, Wei Huang, Maria la de Fuente, Taylor Hughes, Derek J Taylor, Marvin T Nieman, Vera Moiseenkova-Bell, Sudha Chakrapani
Serotonin receptors (5-HT3AR) directly regulate gut movement, and drugs that inhibit 5-HT3AR function are used to control emetic reflexes associated with gastrointestinal pathologies and cancer therapies. The 5-HT3AR function involves a finely tuned orchestration of three domain movements that include the ligand-binding domain, the pore domain, and the intracellular domain. Here, we present the structure from the full-length 5-HT3AR channel in the apo-state determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy at a nominal resolution of 4...
February 6, 2018: Nature Communications
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