keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

cpr interrupted

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221300/comparison-of-continuous-compression-with-regular-ventilations-versus-30-2-compressions-ventilations-strategy-during-mechanical-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-in-a-porcine-model-of-cardiac-arrest
#1
Zhengfei Yang, Qingyu Liu, Guanghui Zheng, Zhifeng Liu, Longyuan Jiang, Qing Lin, Rui Chen, Wanchun Tang
Background: A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Methods: Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized...
September 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220414/detection-of-spontaneous-pulse-using-the-acceleration-signals-acquired-from-cpr-feedback-sensor-in-a-porcine-model-of-cardiac-arrest
#2
Liang Wei, Gang Chen, Zhengfei Yang, Tao Yu, Weilun Quan, Yongqin Li
BACKGROUND: Reliable detection of return of spontaneous circulation with minimal interruptions of chest compressions is part of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and routinely done by checking pulsation of carotid arteries. However, manual palpation was time-consuming and unreliable even if performed by expert clinicians. Therefore, automated accurate pulse detection with minimal interruptions of chest compression is highly desirable during cardiac arrest especially in out-of-hospital settings...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217851/compression-only-life-support-cols-for-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-by-layperson-outside-the-hospital
#3
Syed Moied Ahmed, Rakesh Garg, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia, Ssc Chakra Rao, Bibhuti Bhusan Mishra, M Venkatagiri Kalandoor, Mukul Chandra Kapoor, Baljit Singh
The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines of compression-only life support (COLS) for management of the victim with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provide a stepwise algorithmic approach for optimal outcome of the victim outside the hospital by untrained laypersons. These guidelines have been developed to recommend practical, uniform and acceptable resuscitation algorithms across India. As resuscitation data of the Indian population are inadequate, these guidelines have been based on international literature...
November 2017: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29206729/extracorporeal-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-in-the-pediatric-cardiac-population-in-search-of-a-standard-of-care
#4
Javier J Lasa, Parag Jain, Tia T Raymond, Charles G Minard, Alexis Topjian, Vinay Nadkarni, Michael Gaies, Melania Bembea, Paul A Checchia, Lara S Shekerdemian, Ravi Thiagarajan
OBJECTIVES: Although clinical and pharmacologic guidelines exist for the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children (Pediatric Advanced Life Support), the practice of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pediatric cardiac patients remains without universally accepted standards. We aim to explore variation in extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures by surveying clinicians who care for this high-risk patient population. DESIGN: A 28-item cross-sectional survey was distributed via a web-based platform to clinicians focusing on cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation team dynamics immediately prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation...
December 4, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175356/point-of-care-ultrasound-use-in-patients-with-cardiac-arrest-is-associated-prolonged-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-pauses-a-prospective-cohort-study
#5
Eben J Clattenburg, Peter Wroe, Stephen Brown, Kevin Gardner, Lia Losonczy, Amandeep Singh, Arun Nagdev
OBJECTIVE: We aim to evaluate if point-of-care ultrasound use in cardiac arrest is associated with CPR pause duration. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study of patients with cardiac arrest (CA) presenting to an urban emergency department from July 2016 to January 2017. We collected video recordings of patients with CA in designated code rooms with video recording equipment. The CAs recordings were reviewed and coded by two abstractors. The primary outcome was the difference CPR pause duration when POCUS was and was not performed...
November 23, 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29100652/team-focused-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-prehospital%C3%A2-principles-adapted-for-emergency-department%C3%A2-cardiac%C3%A2-arrest-resuscitation
#6
Blake Johnson, Michael Runyon, Anthony Weekes, David Pearson
BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. OBJECTIVES: Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration...
October 31, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29017660/-rhythm-analysis-in-cpr
#7
Yingying Hu, Jun Xu, Xuezhong Yu
It's necessary to interrupt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a reliable automatic external defibrillator (AED) rhythm analysis, because the mechanical activity from the chest compressions introduces artifacts in the electrocardiogram (ECG) that substantially lower the capacity of an AED to judge cardio-electric rhythm. However, repeated interruptions of compression will reduce the quality of CPR, which in turn affect the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest (CA). In order to improve the quality of CPR, reduce the interruptions of chest compression and implement accurate defibrillation, people have made many efforts on identifying ECG rhythm in CPR...
October 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988159/chest-compression-during-sustained-inflation-versus-3-1-chest-compression-ventilation-ratio-during-neonatal-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-a-randomised-feasibility-trial
#8
Georg M Schmölzer, Megan O Reilly, Caroline Fray, Sylvia van Os, Po-Yin Cheung
BACKGROUND: Current neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio. Recently, animal studies reported that continuous chest compressions (CC) during a sustained inflation (SI) significantly improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The approach of CC during SI (CC+SI) has not been examined in the delivery room during neonatal resuscitation. HYPOTHESIS: It is a feasibility study to compare CC+SI versus 3:1 C:V ratio during neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room...
October 7, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807986/a-turbine-driven-ventilator-improves-adherence-to-advanced-cardiac-life-support-guidelines-during-a-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-simulation
#9
Scott G Allen, Lara Brewer, Erik S Gillis, Nathan L Pace, Derek J Sakata, Joseph A Orr
BACKGROUND: Research has shown that increased breathing frequency during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Rescuers often hyperventilate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Current American Heart Association advanced cardiac life support recommends a ventilation rate of 8 -10 breaths/min. We hypothesized that a small, turbine-driven ventilator would allow rescuers to adhere more closely to advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines...
August 14, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28754527/ultrasound-use-during-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-is-associated-with-delays-in-chest-compressions
#10
Maite A Huis In 't Veld, Michael G Allison, David S Bostick, Kiondra R Fisher, Olga G Goloubeva, Michael D Witting, Michael E Winters
AIM: High-quality chest compressions are a critical component of the resuscitation of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is used frequently during emergency department (ED) resuscitations, but there has been limited research assessing its benefits and harms during the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We hypothesized that use of POCUS during cardiac arrest resuscitation adversely affects high-quality CPR by lengthening the duration of pulse checks beyond the current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommendation of 10s...
July 25, 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521022/management-of-untreatable-ventricular-arrhythmias-during-pharmacologic-challenges-with-sodium-channel-blockers-for-suspected-brugada-syndrome
#11
Stefano Poli, Mauro Toniolo, Massimo Maiani, Davide Zanuttini, Luca Rebellato, Igor Vendramin, Ermanno Dametto, Guglielmo Bernardi, Flavio Bassi, Carlo Napolitano, Ugolino Livi, Alessandro Proclemer
Pharmacologic challenge with sodium channel blockers is part of the diagnostic workout in patients with suspected Brugada syndrome. The test is overall considered safe but both ajmaline and flecainide detain well known pro-arrhythmic properties. Moreover, the treatment of patients with life-threatening arrhythmias during these diagnostic procedures is not well defined. Current consensus guidelines suggest to adopt cautious protocols interrupting the sodium channel blockers as soon as any ECG alteration appears...
May 17, 2017: Europace: European Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499516/improving-cpr-performance
#12
REVIEW
Boulos S Nassar, Richard Kerber
Cardiac arrest continues to represent a public health burden with most patients having dismal outcomes. CPR is a complex set of interventions requiring leadership, coordination, and best practices. Despite the widespread adoption of new evidence in various guidelines, the provision of CPR remains variable with poor adherence to published recommendations. Key steps health-care systems can take to enhance the quality of CPR and, potentially, to improve outcomes, include optimizing chest compressions, avoiding hyperventilation, encouraging intraosseous access, and monitoring capnography...
November 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459305/advanced-airway-type-and-its-association-with-chest-compression-interruptions-during-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-resuscitation-attempts
#13
Angela F Jarman, Christy L Hopkins, J Nicholas Hansen, Jonathan R Brown, Christopher Burk, Scott T Youngquist
OBJECTIVE: To assess interruptions in chest compressions associated with advanced airway placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims. METHODS: The method used was observational analysis of prospectively collected clinical and defibrillator data from 339 adult OHCA victims, excluding victims with <5 minutes of CPR. Interruptions in CPR, summarized by chest compression fraction (CCF), longest pause, and the number of pauses greater than 10 seconds, were compared between patients receiving bag valve mask (BVM), supraglottic airway (SGA), endotracheal intubation (ETI) via direct laryngoscopy (DL), and ETI via video laryngoscopy (VL)...
September 2017: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349529/continuous-chest-compression-versus-interrupted-chest-compression-for-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-of-non-asphyxial-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest
#14
REVIEW
Lei Zhan, Li J Yang, Yu Huang, Qing He, Guan J Liu
BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death worldwide. Cardiac arrest can be subdivided into asphyxial and non asphyxial etiologies. An asphyxia arrest is caused by lack of oxygen in the blood and occurs in drowning and choking victims and in other circumstances. A non asphyxial arrest is usually a loss of functioning cardiac electrical activity. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a well-established treatment for cardiac arrest. Conventional CPR includes both chest compressions and 'rescue breathing' such as mouth-to-mouth breathing...
March 27, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28241962/a-method-to-differentiate-between-ventricular-fibrillation-and-asystole-during-chest-compressions-using-artifact-corrupted-ecg-alone
#15
Guang Zhang, Taihu Wu, Zongming Wan, Zhenxing Song, Ming Yu, Dan Wang, Liangzhe Li, Feng Chen, Xinxi Xu
In recent years, numerous adaptive filtering techniques have been developed to suppress the chest compression (CC) artifact for reliable analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG) rhythm without CC interruption. Unfortunately, the result of rhythm diagnosis during CCs is still unsatisfactory in many studies. The misclassification between corrupted asystole (ASY) and corrupted ventricular fibrillation (VF) is generally regarded as one of the major reasons for the poor performance of reported methods. In order to improve the diagnosis of VF/ASY corrupted by CCs, a novel method combining a least mean-square (LMS) filter and an amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) analysis was developed based only on the analysis of the surface of the corrupted ECG episode...
April 2017: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28113258/an-enhanced-adaptive-filtering-method-for-suppressing-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-artifact
#16
Yushun Gong, Peng Gao, Liang Wei, Chenxi Dai, Lei Zhang, Yongqin Li
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) must be interrupted for reliable rhythm analysis in current automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) because of artifacts produced by chest compressions. However, interruptions in CPR adversely affect the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival. Suppressing CPR artifacts by digital signal processing techniques is a promising method to enable rhythm analysis during chest compressions, which would eliminate CPR interruptions for rhythm analysis. Although numerous methods have been developed to suppress CPR artifacts, the accuracy of rhythm analysis is still inadequate due to the residual artifact components in the filtered signal...
May 6, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Bio-medical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104427/novel-cpr-system-that-predicts-return-of-spontaneous-circulation-from-amplitude-spectral-area-before-electric-shock-in-ventricular-fibrillation
#17
Yoshihide Nakagawa, Mari Amino, Sadaki Inokuchi, Satoshi Hayashi, Tsutomu Wakabayashi, Tatsuya Noda
AIM: Amplitude spectral area (AMSA), an index for analysing ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveforms, is thought to predict the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after electric shocks, but its validity is unconfirmed. We developed an equation to predict ROSC, where the change in AMSA (ΔAMSA) is added to AMSA measured immediately before the first shock (AMSA1). We examine the validity of this equation by comparing it with the conventional AMSA1-only equation. METHOD: We retrospectively investigated 285 VF patients given prehospital electric shocks by emergency medical services...
January 16, 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942341/short-lessons-in-basic-life-support-improve-self-assurance-in-performing-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#18
Mario Kobras, Sascha Langewand, Christina Murr, Christiane Neu, Jeannette Schmid
BACKGROUND: There are several reasons why resuscitation measures may lead to inferior results: difficulties in team building, delayed realization of the emergency and interruption of chest compression. This study investigated the outcome of a new form of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with special focus on changes in self-assurance of potential helpers when faced with emergency situations. METHODS: Following a 12-month period of CPR training, questionnaires were distributed to participants and non-participants...
2016: World Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911489/palliative-care-interventions-in-advanced-dementia
#19
REVIEW
Edel Murphy, Katherine Froggatt, Sheelah Connolly, Eamon O'Shea, Elizabeth L Sampson, Dympna Casey, Declan Devane
BACKGROUND: Dementia is a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease. Advanced dementia is characterised by profound cognitive impairment, inability to communicate verbally and complete functional dependence. Usual care of people with advanced dementia is not underpinned universally by a palliative approach. Palliative care has focused traditionally on care of people with cancer but for more than a decade, there have been increased calls worldwide to extend palliative care services to include all people with life-limiting illnesses in need of specialist care, including people with dementia...
December 2, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27747683/difficulty-using-smart-pump-logs-to-recreate-a-patient-safety-event-case-study-and-considerations-for-pump-enhancements
#20
Andrew A M Ibey, Derek Andrews, Barb Ferreira
The authors present a case in which a physical anomaly with an infusion pump resulted in an unforeseen fault that the nurse's attempts to resolve unknowingly exacerbated. This case study presents the first report in the literature to detail the difficulty in recreating a patient safety event using smart pump logs, support server continuous quality improvement (CQI) data, and the drug order entry system to elucidate the clinical scenario. A 75-year-old male patient presented to a major teaching hospital and was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a massive gastrointestinal bleed and myocardial infarction, then stabilized...
December 2016: Drug Safety—Case Reports
keyword
keyword
81906
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"