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human milk

Michael L Power, Jay Schulkin, Heather Drought, Lauren A Milligan, Katie L Murtough, Robin M Bernstein
In addition to nutrients, milk contains signaling molecules that influence offspring development. Human milk is similar in nutrient composition to that of apes, but appears to differ in other aspects such as immune function. We examine the longitudinal patterns across lactation of macronutrients, the metabolic hormone adiponectin, the growth factors epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), and two receptors for these growth factors (EGF-R and TGF-β2-RIII) in milk samples collected between days 175 and 313 postpartum from a Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) and between days 3 and 1,276 from a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), and compare the results with human data from the literature...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Primatology
Iulia Bădescu, M Anne Katzenberg, David P Watts, Daniel W Sellen
OBJECTIVES: Determining nutritional development in wild primates is difficult through observations because confirming dietary intake is challenging. Physiological measures are needed to determine the relative contributions of maternal milk and other foods at different ages, and time of weaning. We used fecal stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) and fecal nitrogen concentrations (%N) from wild chimpanzees at Ngogo, Uganda, to derive physiological dietary indicators during the transition from total reliance on maternal milk to adult foods after weaning...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Simona Arena, Giovanni Renzone, Chiara D'Ambrosio, Anna Maria Salzano, Andrea Scaloni
Heating of milk and dairy products is done using various technological processes with the aim of preserving microbiological safety and extending shelf-life. These treatments result in chemical modifications in milk proteins, mainly generated as a result of the Maillard reaction. Recently, different bottom-up proteomic methods have been applied to characterize the nature of these structural changes and the modified amino acids in model protein systems and/or isolated components from thermally-treated milk samples...
March 15, 2017: Food Chemistry
Anna L Funk, Flavie Luce Goutard, Eve Miguel, Mathieu Bourgarel, Veronique Chevalier, Bernard Faye, J S Malik Peiris, Maria D Van Kerkhove, Francois Louis Roger
Nearly 4 years after the first report of the emergence of Middle-East respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and nearly 1800 human cases later, the ecology of MERS-CoV, its epidemiology, and more than risk factors of MERS-CoV transmission between camels are poorly understood. Knowledge about the pathways and mechanisms of transmission from animals to humans is limited; as of yet, transmission risks have not been quantified. Moreover the divergent sanitary situations and exposures to animals among populations in the Arabian Peninsula, where human primary cases appear to dominate, vs...
2016: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Lucille Arragain, Myrielle Dupont-Rouzeyrol, Olivia O'Connor, Nathalie Sigur, Jean-Paul Grangeon, Emilie Huguon, Clothilde Dechanet, Cécile Cazorla, Ann-Claire Gourinat, Elodie Descloux
: We investigated 10 mother-newborn pairs and found a 90% rate of dengue virus (DENV) transmission during the perinatal period. Here, we describe DENV kinetics in the sera of newborns before the onset of disease. Of the breast-milk samples analyzed, 75% tested positive for DENV. BACKGROUND: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease in humans. With this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of vertical (DENV) transmission during the peripartum period and to describe its viral kinetics in serum and breast milk...
October 19, 2016: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
S Negin Mortazavi, Donna Geddes, Fatemeh Hassanipour
This work presents a fluid dynamic study of milk flow in lactating human breast. The motivation for this study is in part to improve the fundamental understanding of transport processes in an important but insufficiently studied human organ, and in part to produce a new methodology for the understanding of the pathologies of lactation, which can have a huge impact on the health and well-being of a significant proportion of the population. This collaborative effort among lactation specialists and fluid dynamic engineers starts with a careful, statistically representative measurement of infant suckling patterns...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
Leyla Asena, Esra Hülya Suveren, Gülten Karabay, Dilek Dursun Altinors
PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of human breast milk on corneal epithelial wound healing. METHODS: The effects of human breast milk on epithelial healing is compared with autologous serum and artificial tears on 24 female Bal-b/C mice. A central corneal epithelial defect was created using a 2 mm trephine. Four groups were formed. By a random pick-up, topical human breast milk 4 × 1 was given to Group 1, topical mouse autologous serum 4 × 1 was applied to Group 2, and preservative-free artificial tears 4 × 1 was applied to Group 3...
October 19, 2016: Current Eye Research
Carlos Vera, Andrés Córdova, Carla Aburto, Cecilia Guerrero, Sebastián Suárez, Andrés Illanes
Lactose-derived non-digestible oligosaccharides are prominent components of functional foods. Among them, galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) outstand for being prebiotics whose health-promoting effects are supported on strong scientific evidences, having unique properties as substitutes of human milk oligosaccharides in formulas for newborns and infants. GOS are currently produced enzymatically in a kinetically-controlled reaction of lactose transgalactosylation catalyzed by β-galactosidases from different microbial strains...
December 2016: World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology
Grzegorz Majka, Grażyna Więcek, Małgorzata Śróttek, Klaudyna Śpiewak, Małgorzata Brindell, Joanna Koziel, Janusz Marcinkiewicz, Magdalena Strus
Translocation of bacteria, primarily Gram-negative pathogenic flora, from the intestinal lumen into the circulatory system leads to sepsis. In newborns, and especially very low birth weight infants, sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The results of recently conducted clinical trials suggest that lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein that is abundant in mammalian colostrum and milk, may be an effective agent in preventing sepsis in newborns. However, despite numerous basic studies on lactoferrin, very little is known about how metal saturation of this protein affects a host's health...
October 18, 2016: Biometals: An International Journal on the Role of Metal Ions in Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine
Daniel Garrido, Santiago Ruiz-Moyano, Nina Kirmiz, Jasmine C Davis, Sarah M Totten, Danielle G Lemay, Juan A Ugalde, J Bruce German, Carlito B Lebrilla, David A Mills
The infant intestinal microbiota is often colonized by two subspecies of Bifidobacterium longum: subsp. infantis (B. infantis) and subsp. longum (B. longum). Competitive growth of B. infantis in the neonate intestine has been linked to the utilization of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). However, little is known how B. longum consumes HMO. In this study, infant-borne B. longum strains exhibited varying HMO growth phenotypes. While all strains efficiently utilized lacto-N-tetraose, certain strains additionally metabolized fucosylated HMO...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Chiara Peila, Nikki E Emmerik, Marzia Giribaldi, Bernd Stahl, Joost E Ruitenberg, Ruurd M van Elburg, Guido E Moro, Enrico Bertino, Alessandra Coscia, Laura Cavallarin
OBJECTIVES: Pasteurization, performed at 62.5°C for 30 min (holder pasteurization), is currently recommended in all international human milk banks guidelines, but it affects some human milk bioactive and nutritive components. The present systematic review is aimed at critically reviewing evidence on the suitability of human milk processing techniques other than holder pasteurization, both thermal and non-thermal, to ensure microbiological safety, and on the effects of these techniques on biologically active donor milk components...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Sheila M Gephart, Michelle Fleiner, Amy Kijewski
BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) can become severe quickly, making early recognition a priority and understanding the occurrence of abdominal and clinical signs of impending NEC important. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships of abdominal signs up to 36 hours before diagnosis of NEC within subgroups treated medically, surgically, or those who died. METHODS: A 3-site, descriptive correlational case-control design with retrospective data collection was used matching each NEC case to 2 controls (N = 132)...
October 14, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Mohamed M El-Diasty, Heba A Ahmed, Ashraf E Sayour, Fatma I El Hofy, Asmaa B M B Tahoun, Saleh M Shafik
The objective of the present study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Brucella spp. in humans and cattle at Sharkia Governorate, Egypt. In addition, identification of Brucella spp. in milk samples by PCR and culture with the evaluation of the risk factors associated with Brucella spp. seroprevalence in humans were carried out. Overall, the seroprevalence of Brucella antibodies in the examined cattle was 23.8%, while in human participants it was 21%. The examination of 205 milk samples using PCR revealed that 6...
October 18, 2016: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Ting Meng, Maryanne T Perrin, Jonathan C Allen, Jason Osborne, Frances Jones, April D Fogleman
OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of storage on bacterial growth and immunological activity of pasteurized human milk and leftover pasteurized human milk that has been exposed to the microflora in an infant's mouth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen mother-infant dyads participated in two separate studies. Mother's milk was pasteurized, and each baby was fed 1 to 2 ounces. Pasteurized and leftover pasteurized milk were stored at room (24°C) and refrigerated temperatures (4°C)...
October 18, 2016: Breastfeeding Medicine: the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Giuseppe Crippa, Dorjan Zabzuni, Elena Bravi, Filippo Rossi
OBJECTIVE: Present data refers to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in which 30 mild-moderate hypertensive patients, received a dietary integration with Grana Padano DOP cheese to evaluate blood pressure (BP) changes.Cow-milk fermentation induced by Lactobacillus helveticus produces peptides with sustained ACE inhibitory activity, mainly dues to 2 tripeptides (valyl-prolyl-proline and isoleucil-prolyl-proline) that have shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in experimental animals and in humans...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Flávio Andrade Francisco, Luiz Felipe Barella, Sandra da Silva Silveira, Lucas Paulo Jacinto Saavedra, Kelly Valério Prates, Vander Silva Alves, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco, Rosiane Aparecida Miranda, Tatiane Aparecida Ribeiro, Laize Peron Tófolo, Ananda Malta, Elaine Vieira, Kesia Palma-Rigo, Audrei Pavanello, Isabela Peixoto Martins, Veridiana Mota Moreira, Júlio Cezar de Oliveira, Paulo Cezar de Freitas Mathias, Rodrigo Mello Gomes
PURPOSE: Environmental and nutritional disorders during perinatal period cause metabolic dysfunction in the progeny and impair human health. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are primarily produced during metabolism of excess blood glucose, which is observed in diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MG) is a precursor for the generation of endogenous AGEs, which disturbs the metabolism. This work aimed to investigate whether the maternal MG treatment during lactation programs the progeny to metabolic dysfunction later in life...
October 17, 2016: European Journal of Nutrition
Feng Liu, Shu-Ping Han, Zhang-Bin Yu, Jun Zhang, Xiao-Hui Chen, Wei-Min Wu, Xue Chu, Bei-Bei Liu
OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of breastfeeding quality improvement on the breastfeeding rate in very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of VLBW and ELBW infants who were admitted from July 2014 to July 2015 (pre-improvement group) and those who were admitted from August 2015 to June 2016 after the implementation of breastfeeding quality improvement measures (post-improvement group)...
October 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
Jing-Ran Ma, Dan-Hua Wang
Breastfeeding is well-known for its benefits of preventing communicable and non-communicable diseases. Human breastmilk consists not only of nutrients, but also of bioactive substances. What's more, the epigenetic effects of human breast milk may also play an important role. Alterations in the epigenetic regulation of genes may lead to profound changes in phenotype. Clarifying the role of human breast milk on genetic expression can potentially benefit the infant's health and his later life. This review article makes a brief summary of the epigenetic mechanism of breast milk, and its epigenetic effects on neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, metabolism syndrome, cognitive function and anaphylactic diseases...
October 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
Xi-Hong Liu
Human breast milk is the most natural and ideal food for the baby. Breastfeeding provides benefits for maternal and child health, child immune function, growth and development, and society. The operation of human milk bank and the use of donor human milk undoubtedly provides a new way of nutrition support for the preterm infants without their own mother's milk and a new kind of treatment for other diseases. Present research on the composition of breast milk focuses on the variety and quantity of proteins, bioactive substances, probiotics and cell population...
October 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
Lorena Claumarchirant, Luis Manuel Sanchez-Siles, Esther Matencio, Amparo Alegria, María Jesús Lagarda
Sialic acid (Sia) contents and bioaccessibility (BA) in human milk (HM) and infant formulas (IFs) were determined, and Sia intakes by infants between 0-6 months of age were evaluated. Total Sia contents in HM decreased during lactation from 136.14 to 24.47 mg/100 mL. The total Sia contents in IFs (13.15-25.78 mg/100 mL) were lower than in HM, and were not related to the addition of ingredients acting as sources of Sia in their formulation. The Sia intakes derived from IFs consumption were lower than in HM, and only one IF reached the intakes provided by HM from the age of two months...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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