Read by QxMD icon Read

amyloid precursor protein

Raquel Marin, Noemí Fabelo, Virginia Martín, Paula Garcia-Esparcia, Isidre Ferrer, David Quinto-Alemany, Mario Díaz
Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. Compelling evidence has demonstrated that alterations in lipid rafts are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such Alzheimer's disease, but at present, whether alterations in lipid raft microdomains occur in other types of dementia such dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unknown. Our analyses reveal that lipid rafts from DLB exhibit aberrant lipid profiles including low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly docosahexaenoic acid), plasmalogens and cholesterol, and reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes...
September 6, 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Shobini Jayaraman, Jose Luis Sánchez-Quesada, Olga Gursky
Lipids in the body are transported via lipoproteins that are nanoparticles comprised of lipids and amphipathic proteins termed apolipoproteins. This family of lipid surface-binding proteins is over-represented in human amyloid diseases. In particular, all major proteins of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including apoA-I, apoA-II and serum amyloid A, can cause systemic amyloidoses in humans upon protein mutations, post-translational modifications or overproduction. Here, we begin to explore how the HDL lipid composition influences amyloid deposition by apoA-I and related proteins...
October 18, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Sagrario Martín-Aragón, Karim Lizeth Jiménez-Aliaga, Juana Benedí, Paloma Bermejo-Bescós
BACKGROUND: Plant secondary metabolites may induce adaptive cellular stress-responses in a variety of cells including neurons at the sub-toxic doses ingested by humans. Such 'neurohormesis' phenomenon, activated by flavonoids such as quercetin or rutin, may involve cell responses driven by modulation of signaling pathways which are responsible for its neuroprotective effects. PURPOSE: We attempt to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the neurohormetic responses to quercetin and rutin exposure, in a SH-SY5Y cell line which stably overexpresses the amyloid precursor protein (APP) Swedish mutation, based on a biphasic concentration-response relationship for cell viability...
November 15, 2016: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology
Kumju Youn, Ji-Hyun Park, Jinhyuk Lee, Woo-Sik Jeong, Chi-Tang Ho, Mira Jun
Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the enzyme involved in the abnormal production of the amyloidogenic peptide Aβ, one of the major causes of histological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, BACE1 represents a key target protein in the development of new potential target for the prevention and treatment of AD. In this study, in vitro anti-AD activity of biochanin A, a dietary isoflavone found in legumes and most notably red clover, were evaluated via human recombinant BACE1 inhibition assay, as well as enzyme kinetic and molecular docking predictions...
October 14, 2016: Nutrients
Zhanna Kobalava
The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in general and heart failure (HF) in particular continues to increase worldwide. CVD are major contributors to death and morbidity and recognized as important drivers of healthcare expenditure. Chronic overactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in human hypertension and HF pathophysiology. RAAS is fundamental in the overall regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis through the actions of hormones, which regulate vascular tone, and specifically blood pressure through vasoconstriction and renal sodium and water retention...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Juliane Schelle, Lisa Häsler, Jens C Göpfert, Thomas O Joos, Hugo Vanderstichele, Erik Stoops, Ulf Neumann, Derya R Shimshek, Matthias Staufenbiel, Mathias Jucker, Stephan A Kaeser
INTRODUCTION: The inhibition of the beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a main therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously reported an age-related increase of tau protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. METHODS: APP transgenic mice were treated with a potent BACE1 inhibitor. CSF tau and CSF Aβ levels were assessed. A novel high-sensitivity tau sandwich immunoassay was developed...
October 14, 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Paul Strecker, Susann Ludewig, Marco Rust, Tabea A Mundinger, Andreas Görlich, Elisa G Krächan, Christina Mehrfeld, Joachim Herz, Martin Korte, Suzanne Y Guénette, Stefan Kins
The FE65 adaptor proteins (FE65, FE65L1 and FE65L2) bind proteins that function in diverse cellular pathways and are essential for specific biological processes. Mice lacking both FE65 and FE65L1 exhibit ectopic neuronal positioning in the cortex and muscle weakness. p97FE65-KO mice, expressing a shorter FE65 isoform able to bind amyloid precursor protein family members (APP, APLP1, APLP2), develop defective long-term potentiation (LTP) and aged mice display spatial learning and memory deficits that are absent from young mice...
May 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
E Candeias, A I Duarte, I Sebastião, M A Fernandes, A I Plácido, C Carvalho, S Correia, R X Santos, R Seiça, M S Santos, C R Oliveira, P I Moreira
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly concerning public health problem of the twenty-first century. Currently, it is estimated that T2D affects 422 million people worldwide with a rapidly increasing prevalence. During the past two decades, T2D has been widely shown to have a major impact in the brain. This, together with the cognitive decline and increased risk for dementia upon T2D, may arise from the complex interaction between normal brain aging and central insulin signaling dysfunction. Among the several features shared between T2D and some neurodegenerative disorders (e...
October 11, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Masashi Asai, Aimi Kinjo, Shoko Kimura, Ryotaro Mori, Takashi Kawakubo, Keiro Shirotani, Sosuke Yagishita, Kei Maruyama, Nobuhisa Iwata
Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic disorder, is caused by trisomy 21. DS is accompanied by heart defects, hearing and vision problems, obesity, leukemia, and other conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In comparison, most cancers are rare in people with DS. Overexpression of dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A and a regulator of calcineurin 1 located on chromosome 21 leads to excessive suppression of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling pathway, resulting in reduced expression of a critical angiogenic factor...
2016: Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Shenqi Wei, Wei Chen, Jingfang Qin, Yingzi Huangli, Li Wang, Yue Shen, Huang Tang
A series of 8- and 11-substituted oxoisoaporphine derivatives have been designed, synthesized, and tested for their ability to inhibit cholinesterase (ChE) in vitro and in vivo, and self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation. Their autophagy activity and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were also assessed. The new derivatives exhibited high AChE inhibitory activity in vivo and in intro. Over half the derivatives exhibited a significant in vitro inhibitory activity toward the self-induced Aβ aggregation...
September 28, 2016: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry
Oyinkan Sofola-Adesakin, Mobina Khericha, Inge Snoeren, Leo Tsuda, Linda Partridge
Several species of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) exist as a result of differential cleavage from amyloid precursor protein (APP) to yield various C-terminal Aβ peptides. Several N-terminal modified Aβ peptides have also been identified in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, the most common of which is pyroglutamate-modified Aβ (AβpE3-42). AβpE3-42 peptide has an increased propensity to aggregate, appears to accumulate in the brain before the appearance of clinical symptoms of AD, and precedes Aβ1-42 deposition...
October 7, 2016: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
Gayathri Swaminathan, Wan Zhu, Edward D Plowey
The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid beta precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-beta, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG...
October 7, 2016: Autophagy
Marzena Ułamek-Kozioł, Ryszard Pluta, Sławomir Januszewski, Janusz Kocki, Anna Bogucka-Kocka, Stanisław J Czuczwar
We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease...
September 5, 2016: Pharmacological Reports: PR
Karine Bertoldi, Laura Reck Cechinel, Bruna Schallenberger, Louisiana Meireles, Carla Basso, Gisele Agustini Lovatel, Lisiane Bernardi, Marcelo Lazzaron Lamers, Ionara Rodrigues Siqueira
A growing body of evidence has demonstrated amyloid plaques in aged brain; however, little attention has been given to amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing machinery during the healthy aging process. The amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic pathways, represented respectively by β- and α-secretases (BACE and TACE), are responsible for APP cleavage. Our working hypothesis is that the normal aging process could imbalance amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic pathways specifically BACE and TACE activities...
October 1, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Sandra A Acosta, Naoki Tajiri, Paul R Sanberg, Yuji Kaneko, Cesar V Borlongan
In testing the hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology in late stage traumatic brain injury (TBI), we evaluated AD pathological markers in late stage TBI model. Sprague-Dawley male rats were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, and 6 months later euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Results from H&E staining revealed significant 33% and 10% reduction in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampal CA3 interneurons, increased MHCII-activated inflammatory cells in many gray matter (8-20-fold increase) and white matter (6-30-fold increased) regions of both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres, decreased cell cycle regulating protein marker by 1...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
Jorge Navarro-Dorado, Nuria Villalba, Dolores Prieto, Begoña Brera, Ana M Martín-Moreno, Teresa Tejerina, María L de Ceballos
There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Hongyu Pan, Dongpi Wang, Xiaoqin Zhang, Dongming Zhou, Heng Zhang, Qi Qian, Xiao He, Zhaoling Liu, Yunjin Liu, Tingting Zheng, Ling Zhang, Mingkai Wang, Binggui Sun
Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was impaired in several Alzheimer's disease models overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). However, the effects of wild-type hAPP on adult neurogenesis and whether the impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis was caused by amyloid β (Aβ) or APP remained unclear. Here, we found that neurogenesis was impaired in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult mice overexpressing wild-type hAPP (hAPP-I5) compared with controls. However, the adult hippocampal neurogenesis was more severely impaired in hAPP-I5 than that in hAPP-J20 mice, which express similar levels of hAPP mRNA but much higher levels of Aβ...
October 11, 2016: Stem Cell Reports
Andrés Norambuena, Horst Wallrabe, Lloyd McMahon, Antonia Silva, Eric Swanson, Shahzad S Khan, Daniel Baerthlein, Erin Kodis, Salvatore Oddo, James W Mandell, George S Bloom
A major obstacle to presymptomatic diagnosis and disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is inadequate understanding of molecular mechanisms of AD pathogenesis. For example, impaired brain insulin signaling is an AD hallmark, but whether and how it might contribute to the synaptic dysfunction and neuron death that underlie memory and cognitive impairment has been mysterious. Neuron death in AD is often caused by cell cycle reentry (CCR) mediated by amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs) and tau, the precursors of plaques and tangles...
September 29, 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Zhong-Hao Zhang, Chen Chen, Qiu-Yan Wu, Rui Zheng, Yao Chen, Qiong Liu, Jia-Zuan Ni, Guo-Li Song
Olfactory dysfunction is an early and common symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is reported to be related to several pathologic changes, including the deposition of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as synaptic impairment. Selenomethionine (Se-Met), the major form of selenium in animals and humans, may be a promising therapeutic option for AD as it decreases the deposition of Aβ and tau hyperphosphorylation in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3× Tg-AD). In this study, 4-month-old AD mice were treated with 6 µg/mL Se-Met in drinking water for 12 weeks and the effect of Se-Met on neuropathological deficits in olfactory bulb (OB) of 3× Tg-AD mice was investigated...
2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Rajesh Kumar, Peter P Nawroth, Jens Tyedmers
Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole...
September 2016: PLoS Genetics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"