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Brandon L Velez, Robert Cox, Charles J Polihronakis, Bonnie Moradi
With a sample of employed women of color (N = 276), we tested the associations of sexist and racist discrimination with poor work outcomes (job-related burnout and turnover intentions) and mental health outcomes (i.e., psychological distress). Drawing from the Theory of Work Adjustment, Organizational Support Theory, and scholarship on discrimination, we tested perceived person-organization (P-O) fit, perceived organizational support, and self-esteem as mediators of the associations of workplace discrimination with the outcomes...
March 2018: Journal of Counseling Psychology
Rob Woods, Teresa Chan, Brent Thoma, Jonathan Sherbino
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: CJEM
Jennifer C Alyono, Robert K Jackler, Sujana S Chandrasekhar
OBJECTIVE: To describe the history of women in the American Otological Society (AOS). METHODS: Biographies of the early women of the AOS were compiled through review of the AOS transactions, their published scholarship, newspaper articles, and memorials. Interviews were conducted with the only two women to have led the society and also with former colleagues and family members of pioneering AOS women members who are no longer with us. The evolving gender composition of the society over time was researched from AOS membership lists and compared with data on surgical workforce composition from multiple sources such as the Association of American Medical Colleges, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, American Medical Association, and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery...
April 2018: Otology & Neurotology
Pedrom C Sioshansi, Robert K Jackler, Jennifer C Alyono
OBJECTIVE: To describe the practice of otology in America during the first quarter century of the American Otological Society (AOS). METHODS: Two sources were used to determine the most prevalent disease conditions cared for and surgical procedures undertaken during this era. All articles published in the AOS transactions between 1868 and 1893 were studied as were the otology textbooks published by 6 of the first 10 Presidents of the Society. RESULTS: The primary emphasis of late 19th century American otological scholarship was on chronic ear infection with numerous articles focusing on complications of otitis including frequent descriptions of fatalities...
April 2018: Otology & Neurotology
Antonia Quinn, Teresa M Chan, Christopher Sampson, Catherine Grossman, Christine Butts, John Casey, Holly Caretta-Weyer, Michael Gottlieb
Traditionally, scholarship that was recognized for promotion and tenure consisted of clinical research, bench research, and grant funding. Recent trends have allowed for differing approaches to scholarship, including digital publication. As increasing numbers of trainees and faculty turn to online educational resources, it is imperative to critically evaluate these resources. This article summarizes five key papers that address the appraisal of digital scholarship and describes their relevance to junior clinician educators and faculty developers...
January 3, 2018: Curēus
Christy L Kollath-Cattano, Emily S Mann, Estephania Moreno Zegbe, James F Thrasher
While the literature on sexual scripts is substantive, with some scholarship examining the role of popular media in the production of dominant and divergent sexual practices and interactions, limited attention has been paid to the contemporary Mexican context. In this article, we share findings from a quantitative content analysis of popular Mexican films in order to explore how sexual behavior is portrayed and more specifically how relationship characteristics, condom use, and substance use interact with representations of sexual behavior...
March 2018: Sexuality & Culture
Aaron Gerow, Yuening Hu, Jordan Boyd-Graber, David M Blei, James A Evans
Assessing scholarly influence is critical for understanding the collective system of scholarship and the history of academic inquiry. Influence is multifaceted, and citations reveal only part of it. Citation counts exhibit preferential attachment and follow a rigid "news cycle" that can miss sustained and indirect forms of influence. Building on dynamic topic models that track distributional shifts in discourse over time, we introduce a variant that incorporates features, such as authorship, affiliation, and publication venue, to assess how these contexts interact with content to shape future scholarship...
March 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Ann R Peden
BACKGROUND: Dr. Hildegard Peplau, considered to be our first modern Nurse theorist and the Mother of Psychiatric Nursing, was a prolific writer, engaging in correspondence with colleagues and students who sought her professional and theoretical expertise. Through these letters, she influenced psychiatric nursing while maintaining a broad international network of professional colleagues. OBJECTIVES: An analysis of letters, written between 1990 and 1998, provides insights into Peplau's last decade of professional life and a model of how to support the next generation of nurse scholars...
March 1, 2018: Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Lisa Beccaria, Megan Y C A Kek, Henk Huijser
OBJECTIVES: In this paper, a review of nursing education literature is employed to ascertain the extent to which nursing educators apply theory to their research, as well as the types of theory they employ. In addition, the use of research methodologies in the nursing education literature is explored. DESIGN: An integrative review. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted for English-language, peer reviewed publications of any research design via Academic Search Complete, Science Direct, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition databases from 2001 to 2016, of which 140 were reviewed...
March 2, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Wendy S Slutske
Social changes, such as the expansion of legal forms of gambling, can influence not only the prevalence of gambling, but can also shape the relative importance of genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in the propensity to gamble. In the present study, I examined differences in the prevalence and in the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to gambling involvement in the United States in 1962 versus 2002. The data came from two sources: (1) a survey of 839 17-year-old same-sex twin pairs from the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test twin study, and (2) an interview of 477 18- to 26-year-old same-sex twin pairs from Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health...
March 12, 2018: Twin Research and Human Genetics: the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
Eduardo L Franco, Gayle A Shinder, Joseph E Tota, Karena Volesky, Sandra D Isidean
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Preventive Medicine
John Tingle
John Tingle, Associate Professor (Teaching and Scholarship), Nottingham Trent University, discusses some recent patient safety reports from NHS Improvement.
March 8, 2018: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
Niodita Gupta, Marko Vujicic, Cassandra Yarbrough, Brittany Harrison
BACKGROUND: The Affordable Care Act of 2010 increased dental coverage for children in the United States, (U.S.) but not for adults. Few studies in current scholarship make use of up-to-date, nationally representative data to examine oral health disparities in the U.S. POPULATION: The purpose of this study is to use nationally representative data to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults of different socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups and to examine the factors associated with untreated caries among children and adults...
March 6, 2018: BMC Oral Health
Bethany Ober Mannon
The field of narrative medicine holds that personal narratives about illness have the potential to give illness meaning and to create order out of disparate facets of experience, thereby aiding a patient's treatment and resisting universalizing medical discourse. Two narratives of bipolar disorder, Kay Redfield Jamison's prose memoir An Unquiet Mind (1995) and Ellen Forney's graphic memoir Marbles (2012) challenge these ideas. These writers demonstrate that one result of bipolar disorder is a rupture to their sense of identity, making straightforward and verbal forms of narrative impossible...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Medical Humanities
Carrie Anne Marshall, Rosemary Lysaght, Terry Krupa
BACKGROUND: Studying the occupations of formerly homeless persons as they transition to becoming housed following long-term homelessness has the potential to offer a meaningful contribution to the ongoing dialogue on homelessness. PURPOSE: Occupational transition was explored with a sample of persons with a history of chronic homelessness to contribute an occupational perspective to current scholarship on homelessness and to inform the practice of occupational therapists who support this population...
February 2018: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. Revue Canadienne D'ergothérapie
Pierre Ongolo-Zogo, John N Lavis, Goran Tomson, Nelson K Sewankambo
There is a scarcity of empirical data on the influence of initiatives supporting evidence-informed health system policy-making (EIHSP), such as the knowledge translation platforms (KTPs) operating in Africa. To assess whether and how two KTPs housed in government-affiliated institutions in Cameroon and Uganda have influenced: (1) health system policy-making processes and decisions aiming at supporting achievement of the health millennium development goals (MDGs); and (2) the general climate for EIHSP. We conducted an embedded comparative case study of four policy processes in which Evidence Informed Policy Network (EVIPNet) Cameroon and Regional East African Community Health Policy Initiative (REACH-PI) Uganda were involved between 2009 and 2011...
February 28, 2018: Health Policy and Planning
Manuel Pastor, Veronica Terriquez, May Lin
Public health scholarship increasingly recognizes community organizing as a vehicle for unleashing the collective power necessary to uproot socioeconomic inequities at the core of health disparities. In this article we reverse the analytical focus from how organizing can affect health equity, and we consider how the frame of health equity has shaped grassroots organizing. Using evidence from a range of cases in California, we suggest that the health equity frame can guide and justify grassroots groups' efforts to improve the health outcomes of marginalized populations; connect issues such as housing and school discipline to health; and provide a rationale for community organizing groups to directly address the trauma experienced by their own members and staff, who often come from communities at risk for poor health outcomes...
March 2018: Health Affairs
Melva Craft-Blacksheare
BACKGROUND: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing developed the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program to address the nursing shortage, increase workforce diversity, and raise the profession's educational level. The program provided scholarships to second-degree underrepresented or economically disadvantaged (UED) students attending an accelerated nursing program to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. METHOD: A midwestern university received three academic-year cycles of NCIN funding...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Nursing Education
Lovoria B Williams, Annette B Bourgault, Michael Valenti, Melissa Howie, Sunil Mathur
BACKGROUND: The United States is steadily becoming more diverse. If current trends continue, the minority population will be the majority by 2043. In contrast to the U.S. population, nursing (the largest health care workforce) is composed of a nearly 76% White population. The literature reports that underrepresented minorities (URM) in nursing programs encounter multiple barriers to academic success. METHOD: A secondary data analysis of a national cohort of URM accelerated nursing students was conducted to examine three factors associated with microaggression-predictors of academic (NCLEX) success, satisfaction, and intent to pursue advanced education-among a cohort of URM accelerated nursing students who had received a national diversity scholarship (n = 2,250)...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Nursing Education
Kenneth D Royal
The topic of assigned seating likely is one that every allied health educator has considered at some point in time. Despite a great deal of informal discussions about the topic, surprisingly, not a great deal of scholarship has explored the role of assigned seating for students in allied health and medical education. While educators can readily recite reasons not to assign seats, rarely can educators provide reasons for doing so. in truth, however, there are many benefits to be reaped from assigned seating in college and medical school classrooms...
2018: Journal of Allied Health
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