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motor speech

Jennifer L Whitwell, Joseph R Duffy, Mary M Machulda, Heather M Clark, Edythe A Strand, Matthew L Senjem, Jeffrey L Gunter, Anthony J Spychalla, Ronald C Petersen, Clifford R Jack, Keith A Josephs
Agrammatic aphasia can be observed in neurodegenerative disorders and has been traditionally linked with damage to Broca's area, although there have been disagreements concerning whether damage to Broca's area is necessary or sufficient for the development of agrammatism. We aimed to investigate the neuroanatomical correlates of the emergence of agrammatic aphasia utilizing a unique cohort of patients with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PPAOS) that did not have agrammatism at baseline but developed agrammatic aphasia over time...
September 30, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Jürgen Keller, Martin Gorges, Helena E A Aho-Özhan, Ingo Uttner, Erich Schneider, Jan Kassubek, Elmar H Pinkhardt, Albert C Ludolph, Dorothée Lulé
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder with pathological involvement of upper and lower motoneurons, subsequently leading to progressive loss of motor and speech abilities. In addition, cognitive functions are impaired in a subset of patients. To evaluate these potential deficits in severely physically impaired ALS patients, eye-tracking is a promising means to conduct cognitive tests. The present article focuses on how eye movements, an indirect means of communication for physically disabled patients, can be utilized to allow for detailed neuropsychological assessment...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Hideaki Kishimoto, Yoshitaka Matsuura, Katsuya Kawai, Shigehito Yamada, Shigehiko Suzuki
When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Gianina Ravenscroft, Nataliya Di Donato, Gabriele Hahn, Mark R Davis, Paul D Craven, Gemma Poke, Katherine R Neas, Teresa M Neuhann, William B Dobyns, Nigel G Laing
Autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of BICD2 are associated with congenital-onset spinal muscular atrophy characterised by lower limb predominance. A few cases have also showed upper motor neuron pathology, including presenting with features resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia. The age-of-onset for the published families is usually at birth but also included cases with childhood- and adult-onset disease. In this report we described two isolated probands that presented in utero with features associated with reduced fetal movements...
September 19, 2016: Neuromuscular Disorders: NMD
Julie Case, Maria I Grigos
Purpose: Articulatory control and speech production accuracy were examined in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and typically developing (TD) controls within a novel word-learning task to better understand the influence of planning and programming deficits in the production of unfamiliar words. Method: Participants included 16 children between the ages of 5 and 6 years (8 CAS, 8 TD). Short- and long-term changes in lip and jaw movement, consonant and vowel accuracy, and token-to-token consistency were measured for 2 novel words that differed in articulatory complexity...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
Anthony R Mawson, Nola T Radford, Binu Jacob
Stuttering affects about 1% of the general population and from 8 to 11% of children. The onset of persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) typically occurs between 2 and 4 years of age. The etiology of stuttering is unknown and a unifying hypothesis is lacking. Clues to the pathogenesis of stuttering include the following observations: PDS is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and birth-associated trauma; stuttering can recur or develop in adulthood following traumatic events such as brain injury and stroke; PDS is associated with structural and functional abnormalities in the brain associated with speech and language; and stuttering resolves spontaneously in a high percentage of affected children...
October 18, 2016: European Neurology
Jessica C Hodgson, Rebecca J Hirst, John M Hudson
Commonly displayed functional asymmetries such as hand dominance and hemispheric speech lateralisation are well researched in adults. However there is debate about when such functions become lateralised in the typically developing brain. This study examined whether patterns of speech laterality and hand dominance were related and whether they varied with age in typically developing children. 148 children aged 3-10 years performed an electronic pegboard task to determine hand dominance; a subset of 38 of these children also underwent functional Transcranial Doppler (fTCD) imaging to derive a lateralisation index (LI) for hemispheric activation during speech production using an animation description paradigm...
September 29, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Jacqueline Laures-Gore, Scott Russell, Rupal Patel, Michael Frankel
BACKGROUND/AIMS: This paper describes the design and collection of a comprehensive spoken language dataset from speakers with motor speech disorders in Atlanta, Ga., USA. This collaborative project aimed to gather a spoken database consisting of nonmainstream American English speakers residing in the Southeastern US in order to provide a more diverse perspective of motor speech disorders. METHODS: Ninety-nine adults with an acquired neurogenic disorder resulting in a motor speech disorder were recruited...
October 14, 2016: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica
Alan S Brown, David Gyllenberg, Heli Malm, Ian W McKeague, Susanna Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Miia Artama, Mika Gissler, Keely Cheslack-Postava, Myrna M Weissman, Jay A Gingrich, Andre Sourander
Importance: Speech/language, scholastic, and motor disorders are common in children. It is unknown whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy influences susceptibility to these disorders. Objective: To examine whether SSRI exposure during pregnancy is associated with speech/language, scholastic, and motor disorders in offspring up to early adolescence. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective birth cohort study examined national population-based register data in Finland from 1996 to 2010...
October 12, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
Ramesh Kaipa
BACKGROUND: Prior studies have investigated the influence of principles of motor learning (PMLs) on speech-motor learning. However, the interactive effect of different PMLs on speech-motor learning remains unknown. PURPOSE: This study is aimed at investigating the interaction of 2 PMLs, that is, practice variability and task complexity and their influence on speech-motor learning. METHOD: Forty healthy individuals (aged 18-30 years) were randomly and equally allocated to 2 groups where they had to either practice a simple (simple group) or a complex phrase (complex group)...
September 2016: Annals of Neurosciences
Telma K Takeshita-Monaretti, Lílian Aguiar-Ricz, Patrícia Bastos, Wilson Marques, Hilton Ricz
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the association of the electrophysiological activity of the pharyngoesophageal transition with tracheoesophageal speech proficiency in total laryngectomees. STUDY DESIGN: An observational (nonexperimental) study of the correlation type with a descriptive approach. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals (26 males), average age 62.5 years, total laryngectomees rehabilitated with the use of a tracheoesophageal prosthesis, were assessed for tracheoesophageal speech proficiency using an adapted protocol and classified as good, moderate, or poor speakers...
September 26, 2016: Laryngoscope
Maya Matheis, Johnny L Matson, Claire O Burns, Xinrui Jiang, W Jason Peters, Michael Moore, Kaitlin A de Back, Jasper Estabillo
PURPOSE: The age of first concern (AOC) of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has substantial implications for early diagnosis and intervention. The current study sought to determine the average AOC, what types of first concerns are most common, and what factors predict earlier AOC in toddlers with ASD. METHODS: This study analyzed the predictive influence of the type of concern, symptom severity, medical diagnoses, and other independent variables on AOC among toddlers with ASD using multiple regressions...
August 11, 2016: Developmental Neurorehabilitation
Cara McComish, Kristen Brackett, Maureen Kelly, Christine Hall, Sharon Wallace, Victoria Powell
Pediatric feeding difficulties are complex and multifactorial in nature. Children who need assessment and individualized treatment for complex feeding problems are best served by an interdisciplinary treatment team. The medical, motor, and behavioral approach to treating pediatric feeding problems is presented as an avenue to treatment. By necessity, this approach requires a well-functioning interdisciplinary team, including nurses, physicians, registered dietitians, and feeding therapists (speech-language pathologists, occupational and physical therapists)...
July 2016: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Kyungsoo Ha, Yiping Shen, Tyler Graves, Cheol-Hee Kim, Hyung-Goo Kim
BACKGROUND: 1q21 microdeletion syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion disorder with de novo or autosomal dominant inheritance patterns and its phenotypic features include intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. MECP2 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and other neurological complications including late-onset seizures...
2016: Molecular Cytogenetics
Malte R Schomers, Friedemann Pulvermüller
In the neuroscience of language, phonemes are frequently described as multimodal units whose neuronal representations are distributed across perisylvian cortical regions, including auditory and sensorimotor areas. A different position views phonemes primarily as acoustic entities with posterior temporal localization, which are functionally independent from frontoparietal articulatory programs. To address this current controversy, we here discuss experimental results from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Bronwyn Carrigg, Louise Parry, Elise Baker, Lawrence D Shriberg, Kirrie J Ballard
OBJECTIVE: This study describes the phenotype in a large family with a strong, multigenerational history of severe speech sound disorder (SSD) persisting into adolescence and adulthood in approximately half the cases. Aims were to determine whether a core phenotype, broader than speech, separated persistent from resolved SSD cases; and to ascertain the uniqueness of the phenotype relative to published cases. METHOD: Eleven members of the PM family (9-55 years) were assessed across cognitive, language, literacy, speech, phonological processing, numeracy, and motor domains...
October 5, 2016: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology: the Official Journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists
Cyril Atkinson-Clement, Audrey Maillet, Didier LeBars, Franck Lavenne, Jérôme Redouté, Alexandre Krainik, Pierre Pollak, Stéphane Thobois, Serge Pinto
Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) represents one of the most efficacious treatments for Parkinson's disease, along with L-dopa therapy. The objective of the present work was to identify the cerebral networks associated with hand movement and speech production tasks performed alone and simultaneously, as well as the effects of STN-DBS on these profiles. Clinical, behavioral, and neuroimaging (oxygen 15-labeled water and Positron Emission Tomography) investigations were used to study single and combined performances of unilateral hand movements and speech production in 11 unmedicated individuals with PD, both off and on STN-DBS...
October 4, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Serena Bianchi, Laura D Reyes, William D Hopkins, Jared P Taglialatela, Chet C Sherwood
Vocal learning is a key property of spoken language, which might also be present in nonhuman primate species, such as chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), to a limited degree. While understanding the origins of vocal learning in the primate brain may help shed light on the evolution of speech and language, little is still known regarding the neurobiological correlates of vocal flexibility in nonhuman primates. The current study used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to assess whether the cerebral cortex of captive chimpanzees that learned to voluntarily produce sounds to attract the attention of a human experimenter (attention-getting sounds) differs in grey matter distribution compared to chimpanzees that do not exhibit this behavior...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
Edwin Maas
Understanding of the behavioural, cognitive and neural underpinnings of speech production is of interest theoretically, and is important for understanding disorders of speech production and how to assess and treat such disorders in the clinic. This paper addresses two claims about the neuromotor control of speech production: (1) speech is subserved by a distinct, specialised motor control system and (2) speech is holistic and cannot be decomposed into smaller primitives. Both claims have gained traction in recent literature, and are central to a task-dependent model of speech motor control...
October 5, 2016: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
Anne Smith, Christine Weber
Remarkable progress has been made over the past two decades in expanding our understanding of the behavioral, peripheral physiologic, and central neurophysiologic bases of stuttering in early childhood. It is clear that stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by atypical development of speech motor planning and execution networks. The speech motor system must interact in complex ways with neural systems mediating language and other cognitive and emotional processes. During the time when stuttering typically appears and follows its path to either recovery or persistence, all of these neurobehavioral systems are undergoing rapid and dramatic developmental changes...
November 2016: Seminars in Speech and Language
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