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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820743/sleep-apnea-a-review-of-diagnostic-sensors-algorithms-and-therapies
#1
Mehdi Shokoueinejad, Chris Fernandez, Emily Carroll, Fa Wang, Jake Levin, Sam Rusk, Nick Glattard, Ashley Mulchrone, Xuan Zhang, Ailiang Xie, Mihaela Teodorescu, Jerome Dempsey, John Webster
While public awareness of sleep related disorders is growing, sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) remains a public health and economic challenge. Over the last two decades, extensive controlled epidemiologic research has clarified the incidence, risk factors including the obesity epidemic, and global prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), as well as establishing a growing body of literature linking OSA with cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, metabolic dysregulation, and neurocognitive impairment. The US Institute of Medicine Committee on Sleep Medicine estimates that 50-70 million US adults have sleep or wakefulness disorders...
August 18, 2017: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819004/acute-oxygen-sensing-by-the-carotid-body-from-mitochondria-to-plasma-membrane
#2
Andy J Chang
Maintaining oxygen homeostasis is crucial to the survival of animals. Mammals respond acutely to changes in blood oxygen levels by modulating cardiopulmonary function. The major sensor of blood oxygen that regulates breathing is the carotid body (CB), a small chemosensory organ located at the carotid bifurcation. When arterial blood oxygen levels drop in hypoxia, neuroendocrine cells in the CB called glomus cells are activated to signal to afferent nerves that project to the brainstem. The mechanism by which hypoxia stimulates CB sensory activity has been the subject of many studies over the last 90 years...
August 17, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818999/short-term-arrival-strategies-for-endurance-exercise-performance-at-moderate-altitude
#3
Joshua L Foss, Keren Constantini, Timothy D Mickleborough, Robert F Chapman
For sea level-based endurance athletes who compete at moderate and high altitudes, many are not logistically able to arrive at altitude weeks prior to the event to fully acclimatize. For those who can only arrive at altitude the night before competition, we asked if there is a physiological and performance advantage in reducing altitude exposure time to two hours prior to competition. On three separate visits, ten cyclists completed overnight laboratory exposures of: 1) a 14-hour exposure to normobaric hypoxia (16...
August 17, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818457/relationship-between-sleep-duration-and-childhood-obesity-systematic-review-including-the-potential-underlying-mechanisms
#4
R Felső, S Lohner, K Hollódy, É Erhardt, D Molnár
AIM: The prevalence of obesity is continually increasing worldwide. Determining risk factors for obesity may facilitate effective preventive programs. The present review focuses on sleep duration as a potential risk factor for childhood obesity. The aim is to summarize the evidence on the association of sleep duration and obesity and to discuss the underlying potential physiological and/or pathophysiological mechanisms. DATA SYNTHESIS: The Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases were searched for papers using text words with appropriate truncation and relevant indexing terms...
July 25, 2017: Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases: NMCD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818154/physiology-based-modeling-may-predict-surgical-treatment-outcome-for-obstructive-sleep-apnea
#5
Yanru Li, Jingying Ye, Demin Han, Xin Cao, Xiu Ding, Yuhuan Zhang, Wen Xu, Jeremy Orr, Rachel Jen, Scott Sands, Atul Malhotra, Robert Owens
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To test whether the integration of both anatomical and nonanatomical parameters (ventilatory control, arousal threshold, muscle responsiveness) in a physiology-based model will improve the ability to predict outcomes after upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: In 31 patients who underwent upper airway surgery for OSA, loop gain and arousal threshold were calculated from preoperative polysomnography (PSG). Three models were compared: (1) a multiple regression based on an extensive list of PSG parameters alone; (2) a multivariate regression using PSG parameters plus PSG-derived estimates of loop gain, arousal threshold, and other trait surrogates; (3) a physiological model incorporating selected variables as surrogates of anatomical and nonanatomical traits important for OSA pathogenesis...
August 14, 2017: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28816683/cardiorespiratory-model-based-data-driven-approach-for-sleep-apnea-detection
#6
Sandeep Gutta, Qi Cheng, Hoa Nguyen, Bruce Benjamin
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic sleep disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Individuals with OSA are rarely aware of the condition and are often left untreated, which can lead to some serious health problems. Nowadays, several low-cost wearable health sensors are available that can be used to conveniently and noninvasively collect a wide range of physiological signals. In this paper, we propose a new framework for OSA detection in which we combine the wearable sensor measurement signals with the mathematical models of the cardiorespiratory system...
August 14, 2017: IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815383/a-5-year-follow-up-study-of-laparoscopic-sleeve-gastrectomy-among-morbidly-obese-adolescents-does-it-improve-body-image-and-prevent-and-treat-diabetes
#7
Moamena Ahmed El-Matbouly, Nesreen Khidir, Hussien Aly Touny, Walid El Ansari, Mohammed Al-Kuwari, Moataz Bashah
BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is widely used, and it is important to examine its physiologic and psychological efficacy among adolescents. We assessed LSG's efficacy for weight loss, its short- and long-term effects on resolving and improving obesity-related comorbidities, and its psychological outcomes among morbidly obese adolescents. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 91 morbidly obese adolescents in Qatar who underwent LSG (2011-2014), with 1- and 5-year follow-ups...
August 17, 2017: Obesity Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814537/public-health-literature-review-of-fragile-x-syndrome
#8
Melissa Raspa, Anne C Wheeler, Catharine Riley
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this systematic literature review is to describe what is known about fragile X syndrome (FXS) and to identify research gaps. The results can be used to help inform future public health research and provide pediatricians with up-to-date information about the implications of the condition for individuals and their families. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted, guided by a variety of key words. The search focused on 4 areas of both clinical and public health importance: (1) the full mutation phenotype, (2) developmental trajectories across the life span, (3) available interventions and treatments, and (4) impact on the family...
June 2017: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812204/multivariable-adaptive-artificial-pancreas-system-in-type-1-diabetes
#9
REVIEW
Ali Cinar
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review summarizes the current state of the artificial pancreas (AP) systems and introduces various new modules that should be included in future AP systems. RECENT FINDINGS: A fully automated AP must be able to detect and mitigate the effects of meals, exercise, stress and sleep on blood glucose concentrations. This can only be achieved by using a multivariable approach that leverages information from wearable devices that provide real-time streaming data about various physiological variables that indicate imminent changes in blood glucose concentrations caused by meals, exercise, stress and sleep...
August 15, 2017: Current Diabetes Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811195/epileptic-interictal-discharges-are-more-frequent-during-nrem-slow-wave-downstates
#10
Péter Przemyslaw Ujma, Péter Halász, Anna Kelemen, Dániel Fabó, Loránd Erőss
Epileptiform activity in various but not all epilepsy and recording types and cerebral areas is more frequent in NREM sleep, and especially during sleep periods with high-amplitude EEG slow waves. Slow waves synchronize high-frequency oscillations: physiological activity from the theta through the gamma band usually appears during scalp-positive upstates while epileptiform activity occurs at transitory phases and the scalp-negative downstate. It has been proposed that interictal discharges (IIDs) are facilitated by the high degree of neuronal firing synchrony during slow wave transitory and downstates...
August 12, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28809834/quantifying-infra-slow-dynamics-of-spectral-power-and-heart-rate-in-sleeping-mice
#11
Laura M J Fernandez, Sandro Lecci, Romain Cardis, Gil Vantomme, Elidie Béard, Anita Lüthi
Three vigilance states dominate mammalian life: wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep, and REM sleep. As more neural correlates of behavior are identified in freely moving animals, this three-fold subdivision becomes too simplistic. During wakefulness, ensembles of global and local cortical activities, together with peripheral parameters such as pupillary diameter and sympathovagal balance, define various degrees of arousal. It remains unclear the extent to which sleep also forms a continuum of brain states-within which the degree of resilience to sensory stimuli and arousability, and perhaps other sleep functions, vary gradually-and how peripheral physiological states co-vary...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800251/fifty-years-of-physiology-in-obstructive-sleep-apnea
#12
Magdy Younes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 11, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798199/human-cerebral-blood-flow-control-during-hypoxia-focus-on-chronic-pulmonary-obstructive-disease-copd-and-obstructive-sleep-apnea-osa
#13
Andrew E Beaudin, Sara E Hartmann, Matiram Pun, Marc J Poulin
The brain is a vital organ that relies on a constant and adequate blood flow to match oxygen and glucose delivery with the local metabolic demands of active neurons. Thus, exquisite regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is particularly important under hypoxic conditions to prevent a detrimental decrease in the partial pressure of oxygen within the brain tissues. Cerebrovascular sensitivity to hypoxia, assessed as the change in CBF during a hypoxic challenge, represents the capacity of cerebral vessels to respond to, and compensate for, a reduced oxygen supply, and has been shown to be impaired or blunted in a number of conditions...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794695/water-filtered-infrared-a-wira-overcomes-swallowing-disorders-and-hypersalivation-a-case-report
#14
Gerd Hoffmann
Case description: A patient with a Barrett oesophageal carcinoma and a resection of the oesophagus with gastric pull-up developed swallowing disorders 6 years and 2 months after the operation. Within 1 year and 7 months two recurrences of the tumor at the anastomosis were found and treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy respectively. 7 years and 9 months after the operation local tumor masses and destruction were present with no ability to orally drink or eat (full feeding by jejunal PEG tube): quality of life was poor, as saliva and mucus were very viscous (pulling filaments) and could not be swallowed and had to be spat out throughout the day and night resulting in short periods of sleep (awaking from the necessity to spit out)...
2017: German Medical Science: GMS E-journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794189/time-of-day-influences-on-respiratory-sequelae-following-maximal-electroshock-induced-seizures-in-mice
#15
Benton S Purnell, Michael A Hajek, Gordon F Buchanan
Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in refractory epilepsy patients. While specific mechanisms underlying SUDEP are not well understood, evidence suggests most SUDEP occurs due to seizure-induced respiratory arrest. SUDEP also tends to happen at night. While this may be due to circumstances humans find themselves in at night, such as being alone without supervision or sleeping prone, or due to independent influences of sleep state, there are a number of reasons why the night (i...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28793386/sleep-disturbance-in-people-with-diabetes-a-concept-analysis
#16
REVIEW
Bingqian Zhu, Catherine Vincent, Mary C Kapella, Laurie Quinn, Eileen G Collins, Laurie Ruggiero, Chang Park, Cynthia Fritschi
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To clarify the meaning of sleep disturbance in people with diabetes and examine its antecedents, attributes, and consequences through concept analysis. BACKGROUND: Sleep is crucial for health, and people with diabetes are frequently beset with disturbances in their sleep. The concept of sleep disturbance in people with diabetes has not been clearly defined. The inconsistent use of sleep disturbance has created confusion and impeded our understanding of the sleep in people with diabetes...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790405/differential-impact-in-young-and-older-individuals-of-blue-enriched-white-light-on-circadian-physiology-and-alertness-during-sustained-wakefulness
#17
Virginie Gabel, Carolin F Reichert, Micheline Maire, Christina Schmidt, Luc J M Schlangen, Vitaliy Kolodyazhniy, Corrado Garbazza, Christian Cajochen, Antoine U Viola
We tested the effect of different lights as a countermeasure against sleep-loss decrements in alertness, melatonin and cortisol profile, skin temperature and wrist motor activity in healthy young and older volunteers under extendend wakefulness. 26 young [mean (SE): 25.0 (0.6) y)] and 12 older participants [(mean (SE): 63.6 (1.3) y)] underwent 40-h of sustained wakefulness during 3 balanced crossover segments, once under dim light (DL: 8 lx), and once under either white light (WL: 250 lx, 2,800 K) or blue-enriched white light (BL: 250 lx, 9,000 K) exposure...
August 8, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780783/implications-of-circadian-rhythm-in-dopamine-and-mood-regulation
#18
REVIEW
Jeongah Kim, Sangwon Jang, Han Kyoung Choe, Sooyoung Chung, Gi Hoon Son, Kyungjin Kim
Mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by an internal time-keeping system, referred to as circadian rhythm. The circadian timing system has a hierarchical organization composed of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and local clocks in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral organs. The circadian clock molecular mechanism involves a network of transcription-translation feedback loops. In addition to the clinical association between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders, recent studies have suggested a molecular link between mood regulation and circadian rhythm...
July 31, 2017: Molecules and Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777178/sleep-disordered-breathing
#19
Nancy R Foldvary-Schaefer, Tina E Waters
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sleep-disordered breathing encompasses a broad spectrum of sleep-related breathing disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), central sleep apnea, as well as sleep-related hypoventilation and hypoxemia. Diagnostic criteria have been updated in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Manual for Scoring Sleep and Associated Events. Neurologic providers should have basic knowledge and skills to identify at-risk patients, as these disorders are associated with substantial morbidity, the treatment of which is largely reversible...
August 2017: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777176/circadian-rhythm-sleep-wake-disorders
#20
Milena Pavlova
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The endogenous circadian rhythms are one of the cardinal processes that control sleep. They are self-sustaining biological rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours that may be entrained by external zeitgebers (German for time givers), such as light, exercise, and meal times. This article discusses the physiology of the circadian rhythms, their relationship to neurologic disease, and the presentation and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders...
August 2017: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
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