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Joachim Richter, Roya Ostovar
The functions of dance and music in human evolution are a mystery. Current research on the evolution of music has mainly focused on its melodic attribute which would have evolved alongside (proto-)language. Instead, we propose an alternative conceptual framework which focuses on the co-evolution of rhythm and dance (R&D) as intertwined aspects of a multimodal phenomenon characterized by the unity of action and perception. Reviewing the current literature from this viewpoint we propose the hypothesis that R&D have co-evolved long before other musical attributes and (proto-)language...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Ismael Apud, Oriol Romaní
Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage from the Amazon, traditionally used by indigenous and mestizo populations in the region. Widespread international use of the beverage began in the 1990s in both secular contexts and religious/spiritual networks. This article offers an analysis of these networks as health care systems in general and for the case of Spain and specifically Catalonia, describing the emergence and characteristics of their groups, and the therapeutic itineraries of some participants. The medical anthropology perspective we take enables us to reflect on the relationship between medicine and religion, and problematize the tensions between medicalization and medical pluralism...
October 18, 2016: International Journal on Drug Policy
Jeremy W Coid, Kamaldeep Bhui, Deirdre MacManus, Constantinos Kallis, Paul Bebbington, Simone Ullrich
BACKGROUND: There is growing risk from terrorism following radicalisation of young men. It is unclear whether psychopathology is associated. AIMS: To investigate the population distribution of extremist views among UK men. METHOD: Cross-sectional study of 3679 men, 18-34 years, in Great Britain. Multivariate analyses of attitudes, psychiatric morbidity, ethnicity and religion. RESULTS: Pro-British men were more likely to be White, UK born, not religious; anti-British were Muslim, religious, of Pakistani origin, from deprived areas...
October 20, 2016: British Journal of Psychiatry: the Journal of Mental Science
Miriam Ethel Bentwich, Nomy Dickman, Amitai Oberman
OBJECTIVES: To explore whether gaps exist between caretakers from different ethno-cultural groups (Israeli-born Jews [Sabras], Israeli Arabs [Arabs], and migrants from Russia [Russians]) regarding their perceptions of autonomy and human dignity of patients with dementia. DESIGN: A mixed-methods research scheme was used, comprised of qualitative and quantitative methods, utilizing semi-structured interviews and self-reported questionnaires. Twenty formal caretakers participated in the qualitative portion, and approximately 200 caretakers were included in the quantitative portion...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
David Glenister, Martin Prewer
Objective Most major Victorian hospitals include religious identity in routine admission demographic questions. However, approximately 20% of admissions do not have their religious identity recorded. At the Royal Melbourne Hospital this missing 20% was surveyed throughout 2014-15 for two reasons: (1) to enable patient care; and (2) to provide an insight into the significance of religious identity for patients. There is scarce literature on this subject, so the present mixed-methods study, including a qualitative component, will start to bridge the gap...
October 21, 2016: Australian Health Review: a Publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Elizabeth Lightfoot, Jennifer Blevins, Terry Lum, Amano Dube
This community-based participatory research study sought to identify the cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo communities in one Minnesota neighborhood that could be mobilized to develop culturally appropriate health interventions. Community asset mappers conducted 76 interviews with Somali and Oromo refugees in in Minnesota regarding the cultural assets of their community. A community-university data analysis team coded data for major themes. Key cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo refugee communities revealed in this study include religion and religious beliefs, religious and cultural practices, a strong culture of sharing, interconnectedness, the prominence of oral traditions, traditional healthy eating and healthy lifestyles, traditional foods and medicine, and a strong cultural value placed on health...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Jonathan Green
At the outset of the French Revolution John Adams penned a series of Discourses of Davila, philosophical ruminations on the sixteenth-century French Wars of Religion. Recent historians have read these Discourses in terms of Adams's Machiavellianism-his conviction that men's passions lead to violence, if unrestrained. But this reading overlooks the extent to which Adams intended his Discourses as a particular investigation into the French nation's character, and into whether the revolutionaries could lay claim to a native, French tradition of mixed constitutional government...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
J G A Pocock
Barbarism and Religion, the first half of J. G. A. Pocock's study of Gibbon's Decline and Fall, was designed to set Gibbon's work in context, using a method developed in Cambridge, by juxtaposing his narrative to many others-to some but not all of which he explicitly referred. Helena Rosenblatt has misunderstood Pocock's intent, which was to show that Gibbon's work took much of its inspiration for its treatment of Christianity from a world of ecclesiastical scholarship. Though Pierre Force shows that Voltaire's erudition was richer than has been thought, he and Gibbon pursued very different forms of learning...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Helena Rosenblatt
Rosenblatt questions whether Pocock's Barbarism and Religion, though enormously learned and rich, in fact accomplishes Pocock's stated aims. In other words, does the context presented help to explain the intended meaning and significance of Gibbon's Decline and Fall? She asks whether Pocock's methodology, indebted to the Cambridge School, is consistent and serviceable and challenges his claim that Gibbon should be seen as a member of the "Protestant Enlightenment."
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Pierre Force
This article offers a critical discussion of Pocock's analysis of the relationship between Gibbon and Voltaire, and particularly the extent to which Decline and Fall was inspired by Voltaire's Essai sur les moeurs. It shows that "Momigliano's hypothesis" about the divorce of philosophy and erudition and their reconciliation in Gibbon was initially a commentary by Momigliano on Voltaire's historical work. It argues that the "Momiglianian model" plays a central role in Pocock's argument in Barbarism and Religion...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Jonathan Israel
In Barbarism and Religion, his six-volume work on the "Enlightenments" of Edward Gibbon, J. G. A. Pocock argues for a "family of enlightenments," disputing accounts, particularly Venturi's and Gay's, of it as a unified phenomenon. This article asserts, however, that Pocock's reconfiguration of different national contexts to emphasize the diversity of strands of the Enlightenment underestimates their commonality and the degree to which they fall into the recognizable currents of radical and moderate. Ultimately, Pocock's attention to the ecclesiastical and theological dimensions of the Enlightenment undermines rather than supports his argument for its pluralism...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Richard Wolin
The sixth and final volume of J. G. A. Pocock's Barbarism and Religion appeared in 2015; Wolin designates this work an exemplar of "total history" and of "philosophical historiography," in Momigliano's term. The symposium to follow-comprising this introduction by Richard Wolin, essays by Helena Rosenblatt, Jonathan Israel, and Pierre Force, and a concluding response by Pocock-constitutes one of the first critical examinations of Pocock's late work, and arises out of a conference hosted at the CUNY Graduate Center in 2010...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Peter T Struck
Ancient Greeks drew advice from oracles, dreams, entrails, the movements of birds, sneezes, and myriad other sources for divination. Classicists typically study such phenomena as examples of occult religion, or for their use as a social mechanism for managing dissent and forging consensus. Ancient philosophical accounts by contrast go a longer way toward considering them seriously, on their own terms. They take them as an invitation into developing speculative accounts of non-standard epistemological schemes...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
David Speed, Ken Fowler
The existing literature addressing Religion and Spirituality supports the idea that attending church is positively associated with health outcomes. However, within this literature there has been an impoverished effort to determine whether the Religiously Unaffiliated will report these positive relationships. Using representative data from Ontario (N = 3620), the relationships between Religious/Spiritual variables (Attendance, Prayer/Meditation, and Religiosity) and health outcomes (Happiness, Self-Rated Health, and Satisfaction with Life) were assessed...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Religion and Health
Matthias Bluemke, Jonathan Jong, Dennis Grevenstein, Igor Mikloušić, Jamin Halberstadt
Despite claims about the universality of religious belief, whether religiosity scales have the same meaning when administered inter-subjectively-or translated and applied cross-culturally-is currently unknown. Using the recent "Supernatural Belief Scale" (SBS), we present a primer on how to verify the strong assumptions of measurement invariance required in research on religion. A comparison of two independent samples, Croatians and New Zealanders, showed that, despite a sophisticated psychometric model, measurement invariance could be demonstrated for the SBS except for two noninvariant intercepts...
2016: PloS One
Anita Strezova, Sheila O'Neill, Cathy O'Callaghan, Astrid Perry, Jinzhu Liu, John Eden
OBJECTIVE: This study explored the attitudes to, and experience of, menopause among Macedonian women living in Australia, including attitudes and responses to hormone therapy (HT) and complementary therapies, as well as related psycho-sexual, relationship and other midlife issues. METHODS: Using qualitative methodology, the study was based on seven unstructured, nondirective group discussions. Natural social groups were recruited, meeting wherever each group felt most at home...
October 10, 2016: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
Neal Krause, Kenneth I Pargament, Gail Ironson, Peter Hill
BACKGROUND: Research indicates that greater involvement in religion is associated with lower rates of substance use and misuse. However, religion is a complex construct that can be assessed in many ways. The purpose of this study is to explore a dimension of religion that has not been evaluated in previous research on poly-drug use: a religious sense of meaning in life. OBJECTIVES: It is hypothesized that a religious sense of meaning in life will offset (i.e., moderate) the effects of chronic financial strain on poly-drug use...
October 19, 2016: Substance Use & Misuse
Pauline Siew Mei Lai, Salinah Mohd Mudri, Karuthan Chinna, Sajaratulnisah Othman
BACKGROUND: Advance care planning is a voluntary process whereby individual preferences, values and beliefs are used to aid a person in planning for end-of-life care. Currently, there is no local instrument to assess an individual's awareness and attitude towards advance care planning. This study aimed to develop an Advance Care Planning Questionnaire and to determine its validity and reliability among older people in Malaysia. METHODS: The Advance Care Planning Questionnaire was developed based on literature review...
October 18, 2016: BMC Medical Ethics
Erik L Edgren
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Critical Care Medicine
M Utsch
Nowadays, issues of religiosity and spirituality are viewed differently than 50 years ago. Social upheaval, migration and secularization have changed the interpretation of religious meaning but have not made religion obsolete. This article describes the differences between a religious and a secular global view and defines spirituality as attachment to a larger entirety. The resources of spirituality are described and the dangers of fanaticism and fundamentalism should not be neglected. Criteria for healthy belief are compared to religious delusion...
October 17, 2016: Der Nervenarzt
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