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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092764/common-deregulated-gene-expression-profiles-and-morphological-changes-in-developing-zebrafish-larvae-exposed-to-environmental-relevant-high-to-low-concentrations-of-glucocorticoids
#1
Qiyu Chen, Caixia Li, Zhiyuan Gong, Eric Chun Yong Chan, Shane A Snyder, Siew Hong Lam
Synthetic glucocorticoids have been detected in environmental waters and their biological potency have raised concerns of their impact on aquatic vertebrates especially fish. In this study, developing zebrafish larvae exposed to representative glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone) at 50 pM to 50 nM from 3 h post-fertilisation to 5 days post-fertilisation were investigated. Microarray analysis identified 1255, 1531, and 2380 gene probes, which correspondingly mapped to 660, 882 and 1238 human/rodent homologs, as deregulated by dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone, respectively...
January 6, 2017: Chemosphere
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092740/temporal-variations-in-early-developmental-decisions-an-engine-of-forebrain-evolution
#2
REVIEW
H Bielen, S Pal, S Tole, C Houart
Tight control of developmental timing is pivotal to many major processes in developmental biology, such as patterning, fate specification, cell cycle dynamics, cell migration and connectivity. Temporal change in these ontogenetic sequences is known as heterochrony, a major force in the evolution of body plans and organogenesis. In the last 5 years, studies in fish and rodents indicate that heterochrony in signaling during early development generates diversity in forebrain size and complexity. Here, we summarize these findings and propose that, additionally to spatio-temporal tuning of neurogenesis, temporal and quantitative modulation of signaling events drive pivotal changes in shape, size and complexity of the forebrain across evolution, participating to the generation of diversity in animal behavior and emergence of cognition...
January 13, 2017: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092531/a-200-1380-khz-quadrifrequency-focused-ultrasound-transducer-for-neurostimulation-in-rodents-and-primates-transcranial-in-vitro-calibration-and-numerical-study-of-the-influence-of-skull-cavity
#3
Charlotte Constans, Thomas Deffieux, Pierre Pouget, Mickael Tanter, Jean-Francois Aubry
Low intensity transcranial focused ultrasound has been demonstrated to produce neuromodulation in both animals and humans. Primarily for technical reasons, frequency is one of the most poorly investigated critical wave parameters. We propose the use of a quadri-band transducer capable of operating at 200, 320, 850 and 1380 kHz for further investigation of the frequency dependence of neuromodulation efficacy while keeping the position of the transducer fixed with respect to the subject's head. This paper presents the results of the transducer calibration in water, in vitro transmission measurements through a monkey skull flap, 3D simulations based on both a μCT-scan of a rat and on CT-scans of 2 macaques...
January 11, 2017: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092083/role-of-dopamine-d2-d3-receptors-in-development-plasticity-and-neuroprotection-in-human-ipsc-derived-midbrain-dopaminergic-neurons
#4
Federica Bono, Paola Savoia, Adele Guglielmi, Massimo Gennarelli, Giovanna Piovani, Sandra Sigala, Damiana Leo, Stefano Espinoza, Raul R Gainetdinov, Paola Devoto, PierFranco Spano, Cristina Missale, Chiara Fiorentini
The role of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors (D2R/D3R), located on midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, in the regulation of DA synthesis and release and in DA neuron homeostasis has been extensively investigated in rodent animal models. By contrast, the properties of D2R/D3R in human DA neurons have not been elucidated yet. On this line, the use of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for producing any types of cells has offered the innovative opportunity for investigating the human neuronal phenotypes at the molecular levels...
January 14, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28091936/task-specific-motor-rehabilitation-therapy-after-stroke-improves-performance-in-a-different-motor-task-translational-evidence
#5
M El Amki, P Baumgartner, O Bracko, A R Luft, S Wegener
While the stroke survivor with a motor deficit strives for recovery of all aspects of daily life movements, neurorehabilitation training is often task specific and does not generalize to movements other than the ones trained. In rodent models of post-stroke recovery, this problem is poorly investigated as the training task is often the same as the one that measures motor function. The present study investigated whether motor training by pellet reaching translates into enhancement of different motor functions in rats after stroke...
January 14, 2017: Translational Stroke Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28091884/pre-mining-trace-element-and-radiation-exposure-to-biota-from-a-breccia-pipe-uranium-mine-in-the-grand-canyon-arizona-usa-watershed
#6
Jo Ellen Hinck, Danielle Cleveland, William G Brumbaugh, Greg Linder, Julia Lankton
The risks to wildlife and humans from uranium (U) mining in the Grand Canyon watershed are largely unknown. In addition to U, other co-occurring ore constituents contribute to risks to biological receptors depending on their toxicological profiles. This study characterizes the pre-mining concentrations of total arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), thallium (Tl), U, and zinc (Zn); radiation levels; and histopathology in biota (vegetation, invertebrates, amphibians, birds, and mammals) at the Canyon Mine...
February 2017: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28091348/effects-of-intermittent-fasting-on-glucose-and-lipid-metabolism
#7
Rona Antoni, Kelly L Johnston, Adam L Collins, M Denise Robertson
Two intermittent fasting variants, intermittent energy restriction (IER) and time-restricted feeding (TRF), have received considerable interest as strategies for weight-management and/or improving metabolic health. With these strategies, the pattern of energy restriction and/or timing of food intake are altered so that individuals undergo frequently repeated periods of fasting. This review provides a commentary on the rodent and human literature, specifically focusing on the effects of IER and TRF on glucose and lipid metabolism...
January 16, 2017: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28090760/expression-patterns-of-cardiac-aging-in-drosophila
#8
Leah Cannon, Alexander C Zambon, Anthony Cammarato, Zhi Zhang, Georg Vogler, Matthew Munoz, Erika Taylor, Jérôme Cartry, Sanford I Bernstein, Simon Melov, Rolf Bodmer
Aging causes cardiac dysfunction, often leading to heart failure and death. The molecular basis of age-associated changes in cardiac structure and function is largely unknown. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is well-suited to investigate the genetics of cardiac aging. Flies age rapidly over the course of weeks, benefit from many tools to easily manipulate their genome, and their heart has significant genetic and phenotypic similarities to the human heart. Here, we performed a cardiac-specific gene expression study on aging Drosophila and carried out a comparative meta-analysis with published rodent data...
February 2017: Aging Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28090566/large-animal-models-the-key-to-translational-discovery-in-digestive-disease-research
#9
Amanda Ziegler, Liara Gonzalez, Anthony Blikslager
Gastrointestinal disease is a prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality and the use of animal models have been instrumental in studying mechanisms of digestive pathophysiology. As investigators attempt to translate the wealth of basic science information developed from rodent, models, large animal models provide a number of translational advantages. The pig, in particular, is arguably one of the most powerful models of human organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract. The pig has provided important tools and insight into intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury, intestinal mucosal repair, as well as new insights into esophageal injury and repair...
November 2016: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089916/stable-curcumin-loaded-polymeric-micellar-formulation-for-enhancing-cellular-uptake-and-cytotoxicity-to-flt3-overexpressing-eol-1-leukemic-cells
#10
Singkome Tima, Songyot Chadarat Anuchapreeda Ampasavate, Cory Berkland, Siriporn Okonogi
The present study aims to develop a stable polymeric micellar formulation of curcumin (CM) with improved solubility and stability, and that is suitable for clinical applications in leukemia patients. CM-loaded polymeric micelles (CM-micelles) were prepared using poloxamers. The chemical structure of the polymers influenced micellar properties. The best formulation of CM-micelles, namely CM-P407, was obtained from poloxamer 407 at drug to polymer ratio of 1:30 and rehydrated with phosphate buffer solution pH 7...
January 12, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089843/early-chronic-low-level-pb-exposure-alters-global-exploratory-behaviors-but-does-not-impair-spatial-and-object-memory-retrieval-in-an-object-in-place-task-in-pre-adolescent-c57bl-6j-mice
#11
Christina Sobin, Mayra Gisel Flores-Montoya, Juan Manuel Alvarez
The mechanisms by which early chronic low-level lead (Pb) exposure disrupts the developing brain are not yet understood. Rodent models have provided promising results however behavioral tests sensitive to effects at lowest levels of exposure during development are needed. Preadolescent animals (N=52) exposed to low and higher levels of Pb via lactation from birth to PND 28 completed the Object-in-Place Task of visual spatial and visual object memory retrieval (at PND 28). Generalized linear mixed models were used, controlling for sex and litter as a random effect...
January 12, 2017: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089708/hair-corticosterone-measurement-in-mouse-models-of-type-1-and-type-2-diabetes-mellitus
#12
Rebecca L Erickson, Caroline A Browne, Irwin Lucki
In diabetes, glucocorticoid secretion increases secondary to hyperglycemia and is associated with an extensive list of disease complications. Levels of cortisol in humans, or corticosterone in rodents, are usually measured as transitory biomarkers of stress in blood or saliva. Glucocorticoid concentrations accumulate in human or animal hair over weeks and could more accurately measure the cumulative stress burden of diseases like chronic diabetes. In this study, corticosterone levels were measured in hair in verified rodent models of diabetes mellitus...
January 12, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089652/hippocampal-prefrontal-connectivity-as-a-translational-phenotype-for-schizophrenia
#13
REVIEW
Florian Bähner, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg
Finding novel biological targets in psychiatry has been difficult, partly because current diagnostic categories are not defined by pathophysiology and difficult to model in animals. The study of species-conserved systems-level mechanisms implicated in psychiatric disease could be a promising strategy to address some of these difficulties. Altered hippocampal-prefrontal (HC-PFC) connectivity during working memory (WM) processing is a candidate for such a translational phenotype as it has been repeatedly associated with impaired cognition in schizophrenia patients and animal models for psychiatric risk factors...
January 12, 2017: European Neuropsychopharmacology: the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089558/startle-suppression-after-mild-traumatic-brain-injury-is-associated-with-an-increase-in-pro-inflammatory-cytokines-reactive-gliosis-and-neuronal-loss-in-the-caudal-pontine-reticular-nucleus
#14
Swamini P Sinha, Pelin Avcu, Kevin M Spiegler, Sreeya Komaravolu, Kevin Kim, Tara Cominski, Richard J Servatius, Kevin C H Pang
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can produce somatic symptoms such as headache, dizziness, fatigue, sleep disturbances and sensorimotor dysfunction. Sensorimotor function can be measured by tests such as the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), an evolutionarily conserved defensive response to a brief yet sharp acoustic stimulus. mTBI produces a long-lasting suppression of ASR in rodents and humans; however, the mechanism of this suppression is unknown. The present study examined whether inflammatory processes in the brainstem (particularly the caudal pontine reticular nucleus, PnC) could account for the suppression of ASR after mTBI, because the PnC is an essential nucleus of the ASR circuit...
January 9, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089175/reduction-of-carcinomatosis-risk-using-icodextrin-as-a-carrier-solution-of-intraperitoneal-oxaliplatin-chemotherapy
#15
I Jouvin, H Najah, C Pimpie, C Canet Jourdan, R Kaci, M Mirshahi, C Eveno, M Pocard
There is no standard treatment in patients with high risk metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) in colonic cancer, as perforated tumour or synchronous ovarian metastasis. Icodextrin 4% (ICDX), presently used to prevent postoperative abdominal adhesions, could inhibit the coactivation of the tumour cells and the microenvironment cells, associated with the development of PC. The aim of this study was to inhibit the formation of the PC in a murine model mimicking surgical situation using ICDX and intraperitoneal (IP) prophylactic chemotherapy...
January 9, 2017: European Journal of Surgical Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088641/pathophysiological-and-behavioral-effects-of-systemic-inflammation-in-aged-and-diseased-rodents-with-relevance-to-delirium-a-systematic-review
#16
REVIEW
Leroy Schreuder, Bart J L Eggen, Knut P H Biber, Regien G Schoemaker, Jon D Laman, Sophia E de Rooij
Delirium is a frequent outcome for aged and demented patients that suffer a systemic inflammatory insult. Animal models that reconstruct these etiological processes have potential to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of delirium. Therefore, we systematically reviewed animal studies in which systemic inflammation was superimposed on aged or diseased animal models. In total, 77 studies were identified. Aged animals were challenged with a bacterial endotoxin in 29 studies, 25 studies superimposed surgery on aged animals, and in 6 studies a bacterial infection, Escherichia coli (E...
January 11, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088389/nalfurafine-is-a-g-protein-biased-agonist-having-significantly-greater-bias-at-the-human-than-rodent-form-of-the-kappa-opioid-receptor
#17
Selena S Schattauer, Jamie R Kuhar, Allisa Song, Charles Chavkin
Nalfurafine is a moderately selective kappa opioid receptor (KOR) analgesic with low incidence of dysphoric side effects in clinical development for the treatment of uremic pruritis. The basis for its reduced dysphoric effect compared to other KOR agonists is not clear, but prior studies suggest that the aversive properties of KOR agonists require p38α MAPK activation through an arrestin-dependent mechanism. To determine whether nalfurafine is a functionally selective KOR agonist, we measured its potency to activate the G protein-dependent early phase of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and the arrestin-dependent late phase of p38 MAPK signaling...
January 11, 2017: Cellular Signalling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087693/de-novo-genome-and-transcriptome-assembly-of-the-canadian-beaver-castor-canadensis
#18
Si Lok, Tara A Paton, Zhuozhi Wang, Gaganjot Kaur, Susan Walker, Ryan K C Yuen, Wilson W L Sung, Joseph Whitney, Janet A Buchanan, Brett Trost, Naina Singh, Beverly Apresto, Nan Chen, Matthew Coole, Travis J Dawson, Karen Y Ho, Zhizhou Hu, Sanjeev Pullenayegum, Kozue Samler, Arum Shipstone, Fiona Tsoi, Ting Wang, Sergio L Pereira, Pirooz Rostami, Carol Ann Ryan, Amy Hin Yan Tong, Karen Ng, Yogi Sundaravadanam, Jared T Simpson, Burton K Lim, Mark D Engstrom, Christopher J Dutton, Kevin C R Kerr, Maria Franke, William Rapley, Richard F Wintle, Stephen W Scherer
The Canadian beaver (Castor canadensis) is the largest indigenous rodent in North America. We report a draft annotated assembly of the beaver genome, the first for a large rodent and the first mammalian genome assembled directly from uncorrected and moderate coverage (< 30 ×) long-reads generated by single-molecule sequencing. The genome size is 2.7 Gb estimated by k-mer analysis. We assembled the beaver genome using the new Canu assembler optimized for noisy reads. The resulting assembly was refined using Pilon supported by shortreads (80 ×) and checked for accuracy by congruency against an independent short-read assembly...
January 13, 2017: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087661/disturbance-by-an-endemic-rodent-in-an-arid-shrubland-is-a-habitat-filter-effects-on-plant-invasion-and-taxonomical-functional-and-phylogenetic-community-structure
#19
Víctor M Escobedo, Rodrigo S Rios, Cristian Salgado-Luarte, Gisela C Stotz, Ernesto Gianoli
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Disturbance often drives plant invasion and may modify community assembly. However, little is known about how these modifications of community patterns occur in terms of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic structure. This study evaluated in an arid shrubland the influence of disturbance by an endemic rodent on community functional divergence and phylogenetic structure as well as on plant invasion. It was expected that disturbance would operate as a habitat filter favouring exotic species with short life cycles...
January 12, 2017: Annals of Botany
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087321/enteric-nervous-system-development-a-crest-cell-s-journey-from-neural-tube-to-colon
#20
REVIEW
Nandor Nagy, Allan M Goldstein
The enteric nervous system (ENS) is comprised of a network of neurons and glial cells that are responsible for coordinating many aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) function. These cells arise from the neural crest, migrate to the gut, and then continue their journey to colonize the entire length of the GI tract. Our understanding of the molecular and cellular events that regulate these processes has advanced significantly over the past several decades, in large part facilitated by the use of rodents, avians, and zebrafish as model systems to dissect the signals and pathways involved...
January 10, 2017: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
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