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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29774439/surgical-education-simulation-and-simulators-updating-the-concept-of-validity
#1
REVIEW
Mitchell Goldenberg, Jason Y Lee
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Competency-based medical education (CBME) is rooted in the use of iterative assessments. We must ensure that the assessments used in CBME are valid, to make acceptable and accurate decisions regarding the competency of a trainee. Until recently, much of the educational and assessment literature in urology have used a now-outdated method of determining validity, based on theory and recommendations from over 50 years ago. We describe a contemporary approach to gathering construct validity evidence for the assessment of urologic trainees, for use in both clinical and simulation environments...
May 17, 2018: Current Urology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29688106/exploring-residents-reactions-to-and-use-of-parent-feedback-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department-a-grounded-theory-study
#2
Katherine A Moreau, Kaylee Eady, Mona Jabbour
BACKGROUND: Competency-based medical education (CBME) involves workplace-based assessment. In pediatrics, patients' parents can participate in this assessment and generate feedback for residents. Prior to routinely collecting parent feedback, it is important to investigate residents' perspectives on it. AIM: To explore residents' reactions to and use of written parent feedback. METHODS: Using a grounded theory approach, we interviewed residents who received written parent feedback at the mid- and end-points of a pediatric emergency training rotation...
April 24, 2018: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676054/considering-the-interdependence-of-clinical-performance-implications-for-assessment-and-entrustment
#3
Stefanie S Sebok-Syer, Saad Chahine, Christopher J Watling, Mark Goldszmidt, Sayra Cristancho, Lorelei Lingard
INTRODUCTION: Our ability to assess independent trainee performance is a key element of competency-based medical education (CBME). In workplace-based clinical settings, however, the performance of a trainee can be deeply entangled with others on the team. This presents a fundamental challenge, given the need to assess and entrust trainees based on the evolution of their independent clinical performance. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to understand what faculty members and senior postgraduate trainees believe constitutes independent performance in a variety of clinical specialty contexts...
April 19, 2018: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29557693/student-perspective-on-outcomes-and-process-recommendations-for-implementing-competency-based-medical-education
#4
Neill Storrar, David Hope, Helen Cameron
PURPOSE: Competency-based medical education (CBME) seeks to prepare undergraduate and postgraduate trainees for clinical practice. Its major emphasis is on outcomes, but questions about how best to reach these remain. One key issue is the need to integrate what matters most to students when setting educational goals: this is crucial if we are to design curricula that trainees understand and engage with, and that promote successful achievement of competencies. METHOD: We interviewed medical students in years 4 and 6 of a 6-year medical degree and used thematic analysis to understand their main educational priorities and how these fit with the aims of CBME...
March 20, 2018: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29517532/a-call-for-mixed-methods-in-competency-based-medical-education-how-we-can-prevent-the-overfitting-of-curriculum-and-assessment
#5
Nam S Hoang, James N Lau
Competency-based medical education (CBME) has been the subject of heated debate since its inception in medical education. Despite the many challenges and pitfalls of CBME that have been recognized by the medical education community, CBME is now seeing widespread implementation. However, the biggest problems with CBME still have not been solved. Two of these problems, reductionism and loss of authenticity, present major challenges when developing curricula and assessment tools.The authors address these problems by making a call for flexibility in competency definitions and for the use of mixed methods in CBME...
March 6, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29485481/a-lack-of-continuity-in-education-training-and-practice-violates-the-do-no-harm-principle
#6
Robert Englander, Carol Carraccio
The paradigm shift to competency-based medical education (CBME) is under way, but incomplete implementation is blunting the potential impact on learning and patient outcomes. The fundamental principles of CBME call for standardizing outcomes addressing population health needs, then allowing time-variable progression to achieving them. Operationalizing CBME principles requires continuity within and across phases of the education, training, and practice continuum. However, the piecemeal origin of the phases of the "continuum" has resulted in a sequence of undergraduate to graduate medical education to practice that may be continuous temporally but bears none of the integration of a true continuum...
March 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29463297/implementation-of-a-competency-based-medical-education-approach-in-public-health-and-epidemiology-training-of-medical-students
#7
Rachel Dankner, Uri Gabbay, Leonard Leibovici, Maya Sadeh, Siegal Sadetzki
BACKGROUND: There is increasing agreement among medical educators regarding the importance of improving the integration between public health and clinical education, understanding and implementation of epidemiological methods, and the ability to critically appraise medical literature. The Sackler School of Medicine at Tel-Aviv University revised its public health and preventive medicine curriculum, during 2013-2014, according to the competency-based medical education (CBME) approach in training medical students...
February 20, 2018: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29409435/simulation-for-competency-assessment-in-vascular-and-cardiac-ultrasound
#8
Florence H Sheehan, R Eugene Zierler
Healthcare providers who use peripheral vascular and cardiac ultrasound require specialized training to develop the technical and interpretive skills necessary to perform accurate diagnostic tests. Assessment of competence is a critical component of training that documents a learner's progress and is a requirement for competency-based medical education (CBME) as well as specialty certification or credentialing. The use of simulation for CBME in diagnostic ultrasound is particularly appealing since it incorporates both the psychomotor and cognitive domains while eliminating dependency on the availability of live patients with a range of pathology...
April 2018: Vascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29315962/multiple-dicer1-related-tumors-in-a-child-with-a-large-interstitial-14q32-deletion
#9
Leanne de Kock, Dominique Geoffrion, Barbara Rivera, Rabea Wagener, Nelly Sabbaghian, Susanne Bens, Benjamin Ellezam, Dorothée Bouron-Dal Soglio, Jessica Ordóñez, Stephanie Sacharow, Jose Fernando Polo Nieto, R Paul Guillerman, Gordan M Vujanic, John R Priest, Reiner Siebert, William D Foulkes
Germ-line interstitial deletions involving the 14q32 chromosomal region, resulting in 14q32 deletion syndrome, are rare. DICER1 is a recently described cancer-predisposition gene located at 14q32.13. We report the case of a male child with a ∼5.8 Mbp 14q32.13q32.2 germ-line deletion, which included the full DICER1 locus. We reviewed available clinical and pathological material, and conducted genetic analyses. In addition to having congenital dysmorphic features, the child developed multiple DICER1 syndrome-related tumors before age 5 y: a pediatric cystic nephroma (pCN), a ciliary body medulloepithelioma (CBME), and a small lung cyst (consistent with occult pleuropulmonary blastoma Type I/Ir cysts seen in DICER1 mutation carriers)...
May 2018: Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29228838/beyond-competency-based-continuing-professional-development
#10
Matthew J Links
Competency based medical education (CBME) has become the default for undergraduate and post-graduate medical education (PGME) but its role in continuing professional development (CPD) is under discussion. Some critical differences between CPD and PGME are identified and these differences applied to: the relative roles of competence and performance; existing criticisms of CBME; heutagogy as a learning theory; and post-modernism as an underlying philosophical perspective. The argument is made that the characteristics of CPD fit with performance based medical education, a heutagogical learning theory, a focus on capabilities, rather than competencies; and a post-modern perspective...
December 11, 2017: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29226237/competency-based-postgraduate-medical-education-past-present-and-future
#11
Olle Ten Cate
Since the turn of the twenty-first century, competency-based medical education (CBME) has become a dominant approach to postgraduate medical education in many countries. CBME has a history dating back half a century and is rooted in general educational approaches such as outcome-based education and mastery learning. Despite controversies around the terminology and the CBME approach, important national medical regulatory bodies in Canada, the United States, and other countries have embraced CBME. CBME can be characterized as having two distinct features: a focus on specific domains of competence, and a relative independence of time in training, making it an individualized approach that is particularly applicable in workplace training...
2017: GMS Journal for Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119582/emotions-and-assessment-considerations-for-rater-based-judgements-of-entrustment
#12
REVIEW
Carlos Gomez-Garibello, Meredith Young
CONTEXT: Assessment is subject to increasing scrutiny as medical education transitions towards a competency-based medical education (CBME) model. Traditional perspectives on the roles of assessment emphasise high-stakes, summative assessment, whereas CBME argues for formative assessment. Revisiting conceptualisations about the roles and formats of assessment in medical education provides opportunities to examine understandings and expectations of the assessment of learners. The act of the rater generating scores might be considered as an exclusively cognitive exercise; however, current literature has drawn attention to the notion of raters as measurement instruments, thereby attributing additional factors to their decision-making processes, such as social considerations and intuition...
March 2018: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29076231/competency-based-medical-education-the-discourse-of-infallibility
#13
Victoria A Boyd, Cynthia R Whitehead, Patricia Thille, Shiphra Ginsburg, Ryan Brydges, Ayelet Kuper
BACKGROUND: Over the last two decades, competency-based frameworks have been internationally adopted as the primary educational approach in medicine. Yet competency-based medical education (CBME) remains contested in the academic literature. We look broadly at the nature of this debate to explore how it may shape scholars' understanding of CBME, and its implications for medical education research and practice. In doing so, we deconstruct unarticulated discourses and assumptions embedded in the CBME literature...
January 2018: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29074340/evaluation-of-clinical-teaching-quality-in-competency-based-residency-training-in-lithuania
#14
Eglė Vaižgėlienė, Žilvinas Padaiga, Daiva Rastenytė, Algimantas Tamelis, Kęstutis Petrikonis, Cornelia Fluit
BACKGROUND AND AIM: In 2013, all residency programs at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences were renewed into the competency-based medical education curriculum (CBME). In 2015, we implemented the validated EFFECT questionnaire together with the EFFECT-System for quality assessment of clinical teaching in residency training. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of characteristics of the resident (year of training) and clinical teacher (gender, age, and type of academic position) on teaching quality, as well as to assess areas for teaching quality improvement...
December 2017: Medicina
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29065031/equal-a-novel-rubric-to-evaluate-entrustable-professional-activities-for-quality-and-structure
#15
David R Taylor, Yoon Soo Park, Rylan Egan, Ming-Ka Chan, Jolanta Karpinski, Claire Touchie, Linda S Snell, Ara Tekian
PURPOSE: Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) have become a cornerstone of assessment in competency-based medical education (CBME). Increasingly, EPAs are being adopted that do not conform to EPA standards. This study aimed to develop and validate a scoring rubric to evaluate EPAs for alignment with their purpose, and to identify substandard EPAs. METHOD: The EQual rubric was developed and revised by a team of education scholars with expertise in EPAs. It was then applied by four residency program directors/CBME leads (PDs) and four nonclinician support staff to 31 stage-specific EPAs developed for internal medicine in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada's Competency by Design framework...
November 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28984354/cpd-of-the-future-a-partnership-between-quality-improvement-and-competency-based-education
#16
Joan Sargeant, Brian M Wong, Craig M Campbell
CONTEXT: Many of those involved in continuing professional development (CPD) over the past 10 years have engaged in discussions about its goals and activities. Whereas in the past CPD was viewed as an education intervention directed towards the medical expert role, recent research highlights the need to expand the scope of CPD and to promote its more explicit role in improving patient care and health outcomes. Recent developments in quality improvement (QI) and competency-based medical education (CBME), guided by appropriate theories of learning and change, can shed light on how the field might best advance...
January 2018: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28953567/assessment-of-technical-skills-competence-in-the-operating-room-a-systematic-and-scoping-review
#17
Christine Fahim, Natalie Wagner, Markuu T Nousiainen, Ranil Sonnadara
PURPOSE: While academic accreditation bodies continue to promote competency-based medical education (CBME), the feasibility of conducting regular CBME assessments remains challenging. The purpose of this study was to identify evidence pertaining to the practical application of assessments that aim to measure technical competence for surgical trainees in a nonsimulated, operative setting. METHOD: In August 2016, the authors systematically searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for English-language, peer-reviewed articles published in or after 1996...
September 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767496/situating-remediation-accommodating-success-and-failure-in-medical-education-systems
#18
Rachel H Ellaway, Calvin L Chou, Adina L Kalet
There has been a widespread shift to competency-based medical education (CBME) in the United States and Canada. Much of the CBME discourse has focused on the successful learner, with relatively little attention paid to what happens in CBME systems when learners stumble or fail. Emerging issues, such as the well-documented problem of "failure to fail" and concerns about litigious learners, have highlighted a need for well-defined and integrated frameworks to support and guide strategic approaches to the remediation of struggling medical learners...
March 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611893/academic-primer-series-key-papers-about-competency-based-medical-education
#19
REVIEW
Robert Cooney, Teresa M Chan, Michael Gottlieb, Michael Abraham, Sylvia Alden, Jillian Mongelluzzo, Michael Pasirstein, Jonathan Sherbino
INTRODUCTION: Competency-based medical education (CBME) presents a paradigm shift in medical training. This outcome-based education movement has triggered substantive changes across the globe. Since this transition is only beginning, many faculty members may not have experience with CBME nor a solid foundation in the grounding literature. We identify and summarize key papers to help faculty members learn more about CBME. METHODS: Based on the online discussions of the 2016-2017 ALiEM Faculty Incubator program, a series of papers on the topic of CBME was developed...
June 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28598749/changing-the-culture-of-medical-training-an-important-step-toward-the-implementation-of-competency-based-medical-education
#20
Peter C Ferguson, Kelly J Caverzagie, Markku T Nousiainen, Linda Snell
OBJECTIVE: The current medical education system is steeped in tradition and has been shaped by many long-held beliefs and convictions about the essential components of training. The objective of this article is to propose initiatives to overcome biases against competency-based medical education (CBME) in the culture of medical education. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a retreat of the International Competency Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators group, an intensive brainstorming session was held to determine potential barriers to adoption of CBME in the culture of medical education...
June 2017: Medical Teacher
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