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Fecal immunochemical testing

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29780602/screening-for-colorectal-cancer-in-tianhe-guangzhou-results-of-combining-fecal-immunochemical-tests-and-risk-factors-for-selecting-patients-requiring-colonoscopy
#1
Yi Liao, Senmao Li, Chunyu Chen, Xuan He, Feng Lin, Jianping Wang, Zuli Yang, Ping Lan
Objective: To explore the performance of a protocol combining fecal immunochemical test (FIT) and a high-risk factor questionnaire (HRFQ) for selecting patients requiring colonoscopy as part of a population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in China. Methods: From 2015 to 2016, we conducted a CRC screening program for all residents aged 45 years or older in Tianhe District, Guangzhou City, China. Participants underwent an FIT and received an HRFQ as part of primary screening...
May 2018: Gastroenterology Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29778550/the-factors-associated-with-negative-colonoscopy-in-screening-subjects-with-positive-immunochemical-stool-occult-blood-test-outcomes
#2
Po-Hsiang Ting, Xi-Hsuan Lin, Jeng-Kai Jiang, Jiing-Chyuan Luo, Ping-Hsien Chen, Yen-Po Wang, I-Fang Hsin, Chin Lin Perng, Ming-Chih Hou, Fa-Yauh Lee
BACKGROUND: The immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) is an alternative method to colonoscopy that can be used for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. If the iFOBT result is positive, a colonoscopy is recommended. In this retrospective study, we identify factors associated with negative colonoscopy and positive iFOBT results obtained during CRC screening. METHODS: We collected data for subjects who received a colonoscopy at Taipei Veterans General Hospital after receiving a positive iFOBT result during CRC screening from January 2015 to December 2015...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association: JCMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29774162/a-large-proportion-of-fecal-immunochemical-test-positive-participants-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-is-symptomatic
#3
Clasine M de Klerk, Manon van der Vlugt, Patrick M Bossuyt, Evelien Dekker
Background: Symptomatic invitees are advised not to participate in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening but to directly consult their general practitioner (GP), because fecal immunochemical test (FIT) sensitivity for cancer is not optimal. This recommendation may not always be followed in daily practice. We evaluated how many FIT-positive participants had CRC-related symptoms and whether the presence of symptoms was associated with the presence and location of CRC/advanced neoplasia. Methods: We prospectively collected data on CRC-related symptoms in all FIT-positive participants in the Dutch CRC screening program, referred to our endoscopy centers between 2014 and 2016, and evaluated whether symptoms were associated with detected CRC/advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy...
April 2018: United European Gastroenterology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29767821/formative-research-on-knowledge-and-preferences-for-stool-based-tests-compared-to-colonoscopy-what-patients-and-providers-think
#4
John S Luque, Kristin Wallace, Bridgette F Blankenship, Lydia G Roos, Frank G Berger, Nancy R LaPelle, Cathy L Melvin
The rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in the U.S. remain below national targets, so many people at risk are not being screened. The objective of this qualitative research project was to assess patient and provider knowledge and preferences about CRC screening modalities and specifically the use of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as a first line screening choice. Nine focus groups were conducted with a medically underserved patient population and qualitative interviews were administered to their medical providers...
May 16, 2018: Journal of Community Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29763272/colorectal-cancer-screening-and-prevention
#5
Thad Wilkins, Danielle McMechan, Asif Talukder
Colorectal cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancers arise from preexisting adenomatous or serrated polyps. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer can be reduced with screening of average-risk adults 50 to 75 years of age. Randomized controlled trials show evidence of reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality with guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests and flexible sigmoidoscopy. There are no randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of colonoscopy to reduce colorectal cancer-specific mortality; however, several randomized controlled trials comparing colonoscopy with other strategies are in progress...
May 15, 2018: American Family Physician
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720130/performance-of-a-quantitative-fecal-immunochemical-test-for-detecting-advanced-colorectal-neoplasia-a-prospective-cohort-study
#6
Elizabeth G Liles, Nancy Perrin, Ana G Rosales, David H Smith, Adrianne C Feldstein, David M Mosen, Theodore R Levin
BACKGROUND: The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is easier to use and more sensitive than the guaiac fecal occult blood test, but it is unclear how to optimize FIT performance. We compared the sensitivity and specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia between single-sample (1-FIT) and two-sample (2-FIT) FIT protocols at a range of hemoglobin concentration cutoffs for a positive test. METHODS: We recruited 2,761 average-risk men and women ages 49-75 referred for colonoscopy within a large nonprofit, group-model health maintenance organization (HMO), and asked them to complete two separate single-sample FITs...
May 2, 2018: BMC Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29718843/predicting-the-risk-for-colorectal-cancer-with-personal-characteristics-and-fecal-immunochemical-test
#7
Wen Li, Li-Zhong Zhao, Dong-Wang Ma, De-Zheng Wang, Lei Shi, Hong-Lei Wang, Mo Dong, Shu-Yi Zhang, Lei Cao, Wei-Hua Zhang, Xi-Peng Zhang, Qing-Huai Zhang, Lin Yu, Hai Qin, Xi-Mo Wang, Sam Li-Sheng Chen
We aimed to predict colorectal cancer (CRC) based on the demographic features and clinical correlates of personal symptoms and signs from Tianjin community-based CRC screening data.A total of 891,199 residents who were aged 60 to 74 and were screened in 2012 were enrolled. The Lasso logistic regression model was used to identify the predictors for CRC. Predictive validity was assessed by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Bootstrapping method was also performed to validate this prediction model...
May 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29695244/impact-of-differences-in-adenoma-and-proximal-serrated-polyp-detection-rate-on-the-long-term-effectiveness-of-fit-based-colorectal-cancer-screening
#8
Maxime E S Bronzwaer, Marjolein J E Greuter, Arne G C Bleijenberg, Joep E G IJspeert, Evelien Dekker, Veerle M H Coupé
BACKGROUND: Both the adenoma detection rate (ADR) and proximal serrated polyp detection rate (PSPDR) vary among endoscopists. It is unclear how these variations influence colorectal cancer (CRC) screening effectiveness. We evaluated the effect of variation in these detection rates on the long-term impact of fecal immunochemical test (FIT) based screening. METHODS: The Adenoma and Serrated pathway to Colorectal CAncer (ASCCA) model was set up to simulate the Dutch national biennial FIT-based CRC screening program between 2014 and 2044...
April 25, 2018: BMC Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29682198/blood-free-circulating-dna-testing-by-highly-sensitive-methylation-assay-to-diagnose-colorectal-neoplasias
#9
Yutaka Suehiro, Shinichi Hashimoto, Shingo Higaki, Ikuei Fujii, Chieko Suzuki, Tomomi Hoshida, Toshihiko Matsumoto, Yuko Yamaoka, Taro Takami, Isao Sakaida, Takahiro Yamasaki
Although methylated TWIST1 is a biomarker of colorectal neoplasia, its detection from serum samples is very difficult by conventional bisulfite-based methylation assays. Therefore, we have developed a new methylation assay that enables counting of even one copy of a methylated gene in a small DNA sample amount without DNA bisulfite treatment. We performed this study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of serum DNA testing by the new methylation assay in combination with and without the fecal immunochemical test for hemoglobin for the detection of colorectal neoplasia...
March 30, 2018: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673583/novel-artificial-stool-material-for-external-quality-assurance-eqa-on-a-fecal-immunochemical-test-for-hemoglobin-fit-the-confirmed-utility-of-stable-hemoglobin-and-an-internal-standard-material
#10
Ryota Yasui, Miyu Yamada, Shizuka Takehara, Ikunosuke Sakurabayashi, Katsunori Watanabe
The fecal immunochemical test for hemoglobin (FIT), which detects lower gastrointestinal bleeding, is widely accepted for population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs. However, the FIT screening process has not been standardized yet, and standardizing the pre-analytical phase and establishing an external quality assurance (EQA) program compliant with ISO requirements is urgently needed. Although there have been various attempts to establish EQA materials suitable for FIT, no materials have yet been reported to have sufficient uniformity and acceptable immunochemical stability of hemoglobin (Hb)...
April 16, 2018: Clinica Chimica Acta; International Journal of Clinical Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29670403/variation-of-diagnostic-performance-of-fecal-immunochemical-testing-for-hemoglobin-by-sex-and-age-results-from-a-large-screening-cohort
#11
Hermann Brenner, Jing Qian, Simone Werner
Objective: Fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) for hemoglobin in stool are increasingly used for colorectal cancer screening. Reported sensitivities and specificities have strongly varied between studies, but it is unclear to what extent such variation reflects differences between tests or between study population characteristics. We aimed to evaluate the key parameters of FIT performance for detecting advanced neoplasia (AN) according to sex and age. Methods: Sex- and age-specific sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPVs) and negative predictive values (NPVs) for detecting AN of a quantitative FIT (FOB Gold®) were evaluated among 3211 men and women aged 50-79 years who underwent screening colonoscopy in Germany...
2018: Clinical Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664311/feasibility-of-colon-cancer-screening-by-fecal-immunochemical-test-in-iran
#12
Hamideh Salimzadeh, Faraz Bishehsari, Catherine Sauvaget, Mohammad Amani, Gholamreza Hamzehloo, Ali Nikfarjam, Shahin Merat, Alireza Delavari, Reza Malekzadeh
BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in Iran, where there is no mass screening for the disease yet. We aimed to measure the feasibility of a pilot CRC screening program based on fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in Iranian population and the implications for scaling-up at the national level. METHODS: A single quantitative FIT was offered by health navigators to individuals aged between 45 and 75 years in primary health centers in rural and urban areas in Tehran...
December 1, 2017: Archives of Iranian Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664310/feasibility-of-mass-screening-for-colorectal-cancer-using-fecal-immunochemical-test-in-iran
#13
EDITORIAL
Farin Kamangar, Mahsa Mohebtash
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 1, 2017: Archives of Iranian Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29660528/yield-of-colonoscopy-after-a-positive-result-from-a-fecal-immunochemical-test-oc-light
#14
Muhammad Alsayid, Maneesh H Singh, Rachel Issaka, Victoria Laleau, Lukejohn Day, Jeffrey Lee, James Allison, Ma Somsouk
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is widely used in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The OC-Light FIT is 1 of 2 FITs recommended for CRC screening by the Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. However, little is known about its ability to detect CRC in large average-risk populations. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients (50-75 years old) in the San Francisco Health Network who were screened for CRC by OC-Light FIT from August 2010 through June 2015...
April 13, 2018: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29626451/effectiveness-of-colorectal-cancer-screening-in-detecting-earlier-stage-disease-a-nationwide-cohort-study-in-denmark
#15
Mette Bach Larsen, Sisse Njor, Peter Ingeholm, Berit Andersen
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Most studies of the effectiveness of screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) tested the guaiac FOBT. However, the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is now commonly used in screening. We aimed to evaluate the effects of FIT-based screening for CRC on the number of incident CRC diagnoses and stage at diagnosis for individuals in Denmark who were invited for screening vs not invited. METHODS: We collected data from a register-based retrospective cohort study during the first 16 months of the prevalence round of a FIT-based CRC screening program (March 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015)...
April 4, 2018: Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29610558/effect-of-egualen-sodium-hydrate-on-small-intestinal-mucosal-damage-induced-by-low-dose-aspirin-a-prospective-randomized-clinical-trial
#16
Munetaka Iguchi, Kazuki Kakimoto, Takanori Kuramoto, Kei Nakazawa, Minori Kubota, Yuki Hirata, Kaori Fujiwara, Satoshi Harada, Taisuke Sakanaka, Kazuhiro Ota, Shoko Edogawa, Yuichi Kojima, Sadaharu Nouda, Toshihiko Okada, Ken Kawakami, Toshihisa Takeuchi, Takuya Inoue, Kazuhide Higuchi
Low-dose aspirin, which is widely used to reduce the risk of cardio- and cerebrovascular thrombosis, often induces gastroenteropathy by increasing the permeability of the mucosa. However, therapeutic strategies for patients with low-dose aspirin-induced small intestinal injury have not been determined. We evaluated the preventative effect of egualen sodium hydrate, a gastro-protective agent that suppresses indomethacin-induced small-intestinal damage in rats, against small-intestinal mucosal damage induced by low-dose aspirin in healthy adult male volunteers...
March 2018: Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29610512/risk-of-interval-cancer-in-fecal-immunochemical-test-screening-significantly-higher-during-the-summer-months-results-from-the-national-cancer-screening-program-in-korea
#17
Jae Myung Cha, Mina Suh, Min Seob Kwak, Na Young Sung, Kui Son Choi, Boyoung Park, Jae Kwan Jun, Sang-Hyun Hwang, Do-Hoon Lee, Byung Chang Kim, You Kyoung Lee, Dong Soo Han
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of seasonal variations in climate on the performance of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in screening for colorectal cancer in the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea. METHODS: Data were extracted from the National Cancer Screening Program databases for participants who underwent FIT between 2009 and 2010. We compared positivity rates, cancer detection rates, interval cancer rates, positive predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity for FIT during the spring, summer, fall, and winter seasons in Korea...
April 2018: American Journal of Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29609647/higher-satisfaction-with-an-alternative-collection-device-for-stool-sampling-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-with-fecal-immunochemical-test-a-cross-sectional-study
#18
Hye Young Shin, Mina Suh, Kui Son Choi, Sang-Hyun Hwang, Jae Kwan Jun, Dong Soo Han, You Kyoung Lee, Jae Hwan Oh, Chan Wha Lee, Do-Hoon Lee
BACKGROUND: Identifying preferences for stool collection devices may help increase uptake rates for colorectal cancer screening via fecal immunochemical test (FIT). This study surveyed satisfaction with different devices utilized to collect stool samples for FIT: a conventional container and a sampling bottle (Eiken OC-Sensor). METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the National Cancer Center, Korea. Participants aged 50-74 years who used either a conventional container or a sampling bottle to collect a stool sample for FIT were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to survey their satisfaction with the stool collection process and their intentions to undergo FIT in subsequent screening rounds...
April 2, 2018: BMC Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29609509/bowel-cancer-screening-for-women-at-midlife
#19
I Olver
In Australia one in 15 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in their lifetime because of the high incidences of lifestyle risk factors. The risk could be reduced by taking aspirin. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the prevention, early detection and management of colorectal cancer produced by Cancer Council Australia and approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council recommended that 'population screening in Australia, directed at those at average risk of colorectal cancer and without relevant symptoms, is immunochemical fecal occult blood testing every 2 years, starting at age 50 years and continuing to age 74 years...
April 3, 2018: Climacteric: the Journal of the International Menopause Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29593012/demand-for-colonoscopy-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-using-a-quantitative-fecal-immunochemical-test-and-age-sex-specific-thresholds-for-test-positivity
#20
Sam Li-Sheng Chen, Chen-Yang Hsu, Amy Ming-Fang Yen, Graeme P Young, Sherry Yueh-Hsia Chiu, Jean Ching-Yuan Fann, Yi-Chia Lee, Han-Mo Chiu, Shu-Ti Chiou, Tony Hsiu-Hsi Chen
BACKGROUND: Despite age and sex differences in fecal hemoglobin (fHb) concentrations, most fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) screening programs use population-average cut-points for test positivity. The impact of age-/sex-specific threshold on FIT accuracy and colonoscopy demand for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are unknown. METHODS: Using data from 723,113 participants enrolled in a Taiwanese population-based CRC screening with single FIT between 2004 and 2009, sensitivity and specificity were estimated for various fHb thresholds for test positivity...
March 28, 2018: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
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