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Fecal immunochemical testing

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210537/multilevel-predictors-of-colorectal-cancer-testing-modality-among-publicly-and-privately-insured-people-turning-50
#1
Stephanie B Wheeler, Tzy-Mey Kuo, Anne Marie Meyer, Christa E Martens, Kristen M Hassmiller Lich, Florence K L Tangka, Lisa C Richardson, Ingrid J Hall, Judith Lee Smith, Maria E Mayorga, Paul Brown, Trisha M Crutchfield, Michael P Pignone
Understanding multilevel predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test modality can help inform screening program design and implementation. We used North Carolina Medicare, Medicaid, and private, commercially available, health plan insurance claims data from 2003 to 2008 to ascertain CRC test modality among people who received CRC screening around their 50th birthday, when guidelines recommend that screening should commence for normal risk individuals. We ascertained receipt of colonoscopy, fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and fecal immunochemical test (FIT) from billing codes...
June 2017: Preventive Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182201/screening-by-total-colonoscopy-following-fecal-immunochemical-tests-and-determinants-of-colorectal-neoplasia-in-japanese-men-with-alcohol-dependence
#2
Takeshi Mizukami, Akira Yokoyama, Tetsuji Yokoyama, Shuka Onuki, Katsuya Maruyama
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 9, 2017: Alcohol and Alcoholism: International Journal of the Medical Council on Alcoholism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173773/colorectal-cancer-surveillance-in-hodgkin-lymphoma-survivors-at-increased-risk-of-therapy-related-colorectal-cancer-study-design
#3
Lisanne S Rigter, Manon C W Spaander, Leon M Moons, Tanya M Bisseling, Berthe M P Aleman, Jan Paul de Boer, Pieternella J Lugtenburg, Cecile P M Janus, Eefke J Petersen, Judith M Roesink, John M M Raemaekers, Richard W M van der Maazen, Annemieke Cats, Eveline M A Bleiker, Petur Snaebjornsson, Beatriz Carvalho, Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Katarzyna Jóźwiak, Hein Te Riele, Gerrit A Meijer, Flora E van Leeuwen, Monique E van Leerdam
BACKGROUND: Second primary malignancies are a major cause of excess morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who were treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine have an increased risk to develop colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy surveillance plays an important role in colorectal cancer prevention by removal of the precursor lesions (adenomas) and early detection of cancer, resulting in improved survival rates. Therefore, Hodgkin lymphoma survivors treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine could benefit from colonoscopy, or other surveillance modalities, which are expected to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality...
February 7, 2017: BMC Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28172683/p324-evaluation-of-ability-to-predict-mucosal-healing-by-quantitative-fecal-immunochemical-test-in-ulcerative-colitis
#4
H W Kim, G A Song, D H Kang, C W Choi, D G Ryu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 1, 2017: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167157/replacing-the-guaiac-fecal-occult-blood-test-with-the-fecal-immunochemical-test-increases-proportion-of-individuals-screened-in-a-large-healthcare-setting
#5
Ali Akram, Derek Juang, Ranier Bustamante, Lin Liu, Ashley Earles, Samuel B Ho, Jessica Wang-Rodriguez, James Allison, Samir Gupta
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The most commonly used non-invasive test for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been the guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT). The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) detects CRC and colorectal polyps with higher levels of sensitivity than the gFOBT, and may be more acceptable to patients. However, the FIT has not replaced the gFOBT in many clinical settings. We analyzed data from a large healthcare system that replaced the gFOBT with the FIT to determine the effects on CRC screening...
February 3, 2017: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28154400/inadequate-utilization-of-diagnostic-colonoscopy-following-abnormal-fit-results-in-an-integrated-safety-net-system
#6
Rachel B Issaka, Maneesh H Singh, Sachiko M Oshima, Victoria J Laleau, Carly D Rachocki, Ellen H Chen, Lukejohn W Day, Urmimala Sarkar, Ma Somsouk
OBJECTIVES: The effectiveness of stool-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is contingent on colonoscopy completion in patients with an abnormal fecal immunochemical test (FIT). Understanding system and patient factors affecting follow-up of abnormal screening tests is essential to optimize care for high-risk cohorts. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in an integrated safety-net system comprised of 11 primary-care clinics and one Gastroenterology referral unit and included patients 50-75 years, with a positive FIT between April 2012 and February 2015...
February 2017: American Journal of Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28152558/strong-subsite-specific-variation-in-detecting-advanced-adenomas-by-fecal-immunochemical-testing-for-hemoglobin
#7
Hermann Brenner, Tobias Niedermaier, Hongda Chen
Fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) for hemoglobin are increasingly recommended and used in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We aimed to provide a detailed assessment of the sensitivity of FIT according to type and subsite of neoplasms in a true screening setting. A quantitative FIT (FOB Gold, Sentinel Diagnostics, Milano, Italy) was applied prior to colonoscopy by 3466 participants of the German screening colonoscopy program. Subsite specific sensitivity for various types of colorectal neoplasms was derived by comparing FIT results with findings at screening colonoscopy...
February 2, 2017: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28117881/comparative-effectiveness-of-screening-strategies-for-colorectal-cancer
#8
Afsaneh Barzi, Heinz-Josef Lenz, David I Quinn, Sarmad Sadeghi
BACKGROUND: Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) has been successful in decreasing the incidence and mortality from CRC. Although new screening tests have become available, their relative impact on CRC outcomes remains unexplored. This study compares the outcomes of various screening strategies on CRC outcomes. METHODS: A Markov model representing the natural history of CRC was built and validated against empiric data from screening trials as well as the Microstimulation Screening Analysis (MISCAN) model...
January 24, 2017: Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28114652/feasibility-of-fecal-immunochemical-testing-among-hispanic-and-haitian-immigrants-living-in-south-florida
#9
Natasha Schaefer Solle, Daniel A Sussman, Tulay Koru-Sengul, Julia Seay, Jordan Baeker-Bispo, Erin N Kobetz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 23, 2017: JAMA Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100379/-cost-effectiveness-analysis-on-colorectal-cancer-screening-program
#10
Q C Huang, D Ye, X Y Jiang, Q L Li, K Y Yao, J B Wang, M J Jin, K Chen
Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening program in different age groups from the view of health economics. Methods: The screening compliance rates, detection rates in different age groups were calculated by using the data from colorectal cancer screening program in Jiashan county, Zhejiang province. The differences in indicator among age groups were analyzed with χ(2) test or trend χ(2) test. The ratios of cost to the number of case were calculated according to cost statistics...
January 10, 2017: Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue za Zhi, Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097082/a-review-of-colorectal-cancer-detection-modalities-stool-dna-and-fecal-immunochemistry-testing-in-adults-over-the-age-of-50
#11
REVIEW
Tyler Janz, Karen Lu, Michael R Povlow, Brittany Urso
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Recently, more focus has been placed on developing effective screening tools to detect the presence of both precancerous and cancerous lesions present in the colon and rectum. Colonoscopy has been well established as the gold standard of the colon and rectal cancer screening. However, not all patients are willing to undergo a colonoscopy due to the procedure's invasive nature. Non-invasive screening methods have been developed to appeal to patients who refuse colonoscopy...
December 16, 2016: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076249/fecal-immunochemical-test-fit-for-colon-cancer-screening-variable-performance-with-ambient-temperature
#12
Chyke A Doubeni, Christopher D Jensen, Stacey A Fedewa, Virginia P Quinn, Ann G Zauber, Joanne E Schottinger, Douglas A Corley, Theodore R Levin
INTRODUCTION: Fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) are widely used in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, but hemoglobin degradation, due to exposure of the collected sample to high temperatures, could reduce test sensitivity. We examined the relation of ambient temperature exposure with FIT positivity rate and sensitivity. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients 50 to 75 years in Kaiser Permanente Northern California's CRC screening program, which began mailing FIT kits annually to screen-eligible members in 2007...
November 2016: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076242/bread-and-butter-of-family-medicine-guidelines-population-screening-diagnostic-evaluations-and-practice-models
#13
EDITORIAL
Dean A Seehusen, Marjorie A Bowman, Anne Victoria Neale
This issue of JABFM is full of evidence and thoughtful articles on topics central to family medicine. These articles critically examine what family physicians do on a daily basis. Reports in this issue provide new evidence regarding guidelines, screening programs, evaluation procedures, and practice models. Clinical articles report that the sensitivity of mailed Fecal Immunochemical Testing changes with the weather; a dermatoscope and a simple algorithm can help differentiate malignant from benign skin lesions; and that a few almonds can alter blood glucose levels in response to a glucose tolerance test...
November 2016: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065631/the-fecal-immunochemical-test-has-high-accuracy-for-detecting-advanced-colorectal-neoplasia-before-age-50
#14
Nam Hee Kim, Jung Ho Park, Dong Il Park, Chong Il Sohn, Kyuyong Choi, Yoon Suk Jung
BACKGROUND: In contrast to the decreasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults ≥50 years, the CRC incidence in young adults <50 years is increasing. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) may be useful for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN) screening in a young population. AIMS: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FIT in a young population. METHODS: The diagnostic performance of FIT for detecting ACRN was compared among the following age groups who underwent FIT and colonoscopy as part of a comprehensive health screening program: 30-39, 40-49, and ≥50 years...
December 24, 2016: Digestive and Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28044229/genetic-biomarker-prevalence-is-similar-in-fecal-immunochemical-test-positive-and-negative-colorectal-cancer-tissue
#15
Theodore R Levin, Douglas A Corley, Christopher D Jensen, Amy R Marks, Wei K Zhao, Alexis M Zebrowski, Virginia P Quinn, Lawrence W Browne, William R Taylor, David A Ahlquist, Graham P Lidgard, Barry M Berger
BACKGROUND: Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening detects most asymptomatic colorectal cancers. Combining FIT screening with stool-based genetic biomarkers increases sensitivity for cancer, but whether DNA biomarkers (biomarkers) differ for cancers detected versus missed by FIT screening has not been evaluated in a community-based population. AIMS: To evaluate tissue biomarkers among Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer within 2 years after FIT screening...
January 2, 2017: Digestive Diseases and Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042387/colorectal-cancer-screening-opportunities-to-improve-uptake-outcomes-and-disparities
#16
REVIEW
Neal Shahidi, Winson Y Cheung
Colorectal cancer screening has become a standard of care in industrialized nations for those 50 to 75 years of age, along with selected high-risk populations. While colorectal cancer screening has been shown to reduce both the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is a complex multi-disciplinary process with a number of important steps that require optimization before tangible improvements in outcomes are possible. For both opportunistic and programmatic colorectal cancer screening, poor participant uptake remains an ongoing concern...
December 16, 2016: World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018880/performance-of-a-quantitative-fecal-immunochemical-test-in-a-colorectal-cancer-screening-pilot-program-a-prospective-cohort-study
#17
Jennifer Telford, Laura Gentile, Lovedeep Gondara, Colleen McGahan, Andrew Coldman
BACKGROUND: British Columbia undertook a colorectal cancer screening pilot program in 3 communities. Our objective was to assess the performance of 2-specimen fecal immunochemical testing in the detection of colorectal neoplasms in this population-based screening program. METHODS: A prospective cohort of asymptomatic, average-risk people aged 50 to 74 years completed 2 quantitative fecal immunochemical tests every 2 years, with follow-up colonoscopy if the result of either test was positive...
October 2016: CMAJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986704/comparison-of-collection-methods-for-fecal-samples-in-microbiome-studies
#18
Emily Vogtmann, Jun Chen, Amnon Amir, Jianxin Shi, Christian C Abnet, Heidi Nelson, Rob Knight, Nicholas Chia, Rashmi Sinha
Prospective cohort studies are needed to assess the relationship between the fecal microbiome and human health and disease. To evaluate fecal collection methods, we determined technical reproducibility, stability at ambient temperature, and accuracy of 5 fecal collection methods (no additive, 95% ethanol, RNAlater Stabilization Solution, fecal occult blood test cards, and fecal immunochemical test tubes). Fifty-two healthy volunteers provided fecal samples at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2014...
January 15, 2017: American Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27978410/influences-and-practices-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-among-health-care-providers-serving-northern-plains-american-indians-2011-2012
#19
Melanie Nadeau, Anne Walaszek, David G Perdue, Kristine L Rhodes, Donald Haverkamp, Jean Forster
INTRODUCTION: The epidemiology of colorectal cancer, including incidence, mortality, age of onset, stage of diagnosis, and screening, varies regionally among American Indians. The objective of the Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening study was to improve understanding of colorectal cancer screening among health care providers serving Northern Plains American Indians. METHODS: Data were collected, in person, from a sample of 145 health care providers at 27 health clinics across the Northern Plains from May 2011 through September 2012...
December 15, 2016: Preventing Chronic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936028/cost-effectiveness-of-screening-colonoscopy-depends-on-adequate-bowel-preparation-rates-a-modeling-study
#20
James Kingsley, Siddharth Karanth, Frances Lee Revere, Deepak Agrawal
BACKGROUND: Inadequate bowel preparation during screening colonoscopy necessitates repeating colonoscopy. Studies suggest inadequate bowel preparation rates of 20-60%. This increases the cost of colonoscopy for our society. AIM: The aim of this study is to determine the impact of inadequate bowel preparation rate on the cost effectiveness of colonoscopy compared to other screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: A microsimulation model of CRC screening strategies for the general population at average risk for CRC...
2016: PloS One
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