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L Lafferty, C Treloar, J Guthrie, G M Chambers, T Butler
Prisoner populations are characterized by high rates of hepatitis C (HCV), up to thirty times that of the general population in Australia. Within Australian prisons, less than 1% of eligible inmates access treatment. Public health strategies informed by social capital could be important in addressing this inequality in access to HCV treatment. Twenty-eight male inmates participated in qualitative interviews across three correctional centres in New South Wales, Australia. All participants had recently tested as HCV RNA positive or were receiving HCV treatment...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Viral Hepatitis
L M M Iglecias, M A M Puga, M A Pompílio, S A Teles, J Croda, L A Lima, B V Lago, R M B Martins, A R C Motta-Castro
BACKGROUND: Due to environmental and social conditions inherent to incarceration, tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major diseases among prison inmates. OBJECTIVE: To determine overall and occult HBV infection (OBI) prevalence rates, risk factors and genotype distribution among inmates with active TB. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 216 inmates with active TB recruited at the largest prisons in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Central Brazil...
November 2016: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Jangho Yoon, Jeff Luck
This study examines the extent to which increased public mental health expenditures lead to a reduction in jail populations and computes the associated intersystem return on investment (ROI). We analyze unique panel data on 44 U.S. states and D.C. for years 2001-2009. To isolate the intersystem spillover effect, we exploit variations across states and over time within states in per capita public mental health expenditures and average daily jail inmates. Regression models control for a comprehensive set of determinants of jail incarcerations as well as unobserved determinants specific to state and year...
October 18, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Kelly E Moore, June P Tangney, Jeffrey B Stuewig
Upon conviction, individuals receive the stigmatizing label "criminal offender." Existing stereotypes about criminal offenders may be integrated into the self-concept, a phenomenon known as self-stigma. In many stigmatized groups, self-stigma is a robust predictor of poor functioning (Livingston & Boyd, 2010; Schomerus et al., 2011). However, little is known about how self-stigma occurs (Corrigan et al., 2006), and there has been limited research with criminal offenders. This study examines a theoretical model of self-stigma in which perceived stigma leads to stereotype agreement, internalized stigma, and then to anticipated stigma...
August 2016: Stigma Health
Teklay Gebrecherkos, Baye Gelaw, Belay Tessema
BACKGROUND: In correctional settings tuberculosis is a public health concern. The incarcerated population is at greater risk for tuberculosis (TB) than the general population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and associated risk factors in prison settings. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among prisoners of North Gondar zone where all inmates with a history of cough for ≥ 2 weeks were included...
October 18, 2016: BMC Public Health
Gilberto Ayala, Julio Garay, Miguel Aragon, Tom Decroo, Rony Zachariah
Objective To describe trends in tuberculosis (TB) notification and treatment outcomes in 25 prisons in El Salvador from 2009-2014 and to determine if a set of interventions introduced in 2011 affected TB case finding and management. Methods This was operational research that utilized a retrospective cohort study of program data from 2009-2014. The package of interventions introduced in 2011 provides staff training, engages inmates in TB case finding, and offers diagnosis through mobile X-ray and Xpert® MTB/RIF...
January 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Kathleen Brewer-Smyth, Monica Cornelius, Ryan T Pohlig
The staggering prevalence of obesity and obesity-related health conditions takes exorbitant tolls on health care resources. This cross-sectional study with private evaluations of 636 adult inmates in a southern state prison was conducted with regressions comparing obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30) to nonobese individuals to define obesity risk factors. Obese individuals more likely were female, were victims of childhood sexual abuse, suffered greater severity of childhood sexual abuse, attempted suicide, reported drug dependency, were non-Caucasian, and were older than nonobese...
October 2016: Journal of Correctional Health Care
Nicholas R Degner, Alfred Joshua, Rex Padilla, Holly H Vo, Gary M Vilke
This study compares purified protein derivative (PPD) screening to digital chest radiography (CXR) screening for tuberculosis (TB) in newly admitted inmates in the San Diego County Jail system. The study period lasted from 2002 to 2014, during which 45 cases of active TB were detected, a rate of 69.2 cases per 100,000 person-years. Compared to PPD, CXR reduces the median number of days active TB cases were in the general population from 44.4 to 5.2 days and the number of exposures from 1,222 to 138 persons...
October 2016: Journal of Correctional Health Care
Valerie Senkowski, Katherine Norris, Anthony McGaughey, Paul Branscum
This article reviews the effectiveness of HIV sexual risk prevention programs among adult prison inmates. A database search was performed to identify studies that used HIV sexual risk prevention programs with incarcerated adults. Of the 234 articles identified, 9 met the inclusion criteria. In addition, 5 articles were found containing supporting information for the 9 studies reviewed, increasing the number of articles reviewed to 14. All studies reported a significant increase in knowledge or a decrease in high-risk behaviors among the inmates at the conclusion of the interventions...
October 2016: Journal of Correctional Health Care
Ank E Nijhawan, Princess A Iroh, Larry S Brown, Daniel Winetsky, Esmaeil Porsa
BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) disproportionately affects immigrants, HIV-infected individuals, and those living in crowded settings such as homeless shelters and correctional facilities. Although the majority of jails and prisons use a tuberculin skin test (TST) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) screening, limited data exist on the clinical performance and costs of the TST compared to interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) in this setting. METHODS: A prospective pilot study comparing cost between TST and an IGRA (QuantiFERON Gold In-tube, QFT-GIT) for the detection of LTBI in a convenience sample of inmates entering the Dallas County Jail (DCJ) was conducted June-October 2014...
October 12, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Sanford Nidich, Tom O'connor, Thomas Rutledge, Jeff Duncan, Blaze Compton, Angela Seng, Randi Nidich
CONTEXT: Trauma events are four times more prevalent in inmates than in the general public and are associated with increased recidivism and other mental and physical health issues. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of Transcendental Meditation(a) (TM) on trauma symptoms in male inmates. DESIGN: One hundred eighty-one inmates with a moderate- to high-risk criminal profile were randomly assigned to either the TM program or to a usual care control group...
October 7, 2016: Permanente Journal
Dayse Sanchez Guimarães Paião, Everton Ferreira Lemos, Andrea da Silva Santos Carbone, Renata Viebrantz Enne Sgarbi, Alexandre Laranjeira Junior, Fellipe Matos da Silva, Letícia Marques Brandão, Luciana Squarizi Dos Santos, Vaneli Silva Martins, Simone Simionatto, Ana Rita Coimbra Motta-Castro, Maurício Antônio Pompílio, Juliana Urrego, Albert Icksang Ko, Jason Randolph Andrews, Julio Croda
BACKGROUND: Globally, prison inmates are a high-risk population for tuberculosis (TB), but the specific drivers of disease and impact of mass screening interventions are poorly understood. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study to characterize the incidence and risk factors for tuberculosis infection and disease in 12 Brazilian prisons, and to investigate the effect of mass screening on subsequent disease risk. After recruiting a stratified random sample of inmates, we administered a questionnaire to ascertain symptoms and potential risk factors for tuberculosis; performed tuberculin skin testing (TST); collected sera for HIV testing; and obtained two sputum samples for smear microscopy and culture, from participants reporting a cough of any duration...
October 3, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Adam L Beckman, Alyssa Bilinski, Ryan Boyko, George M Camp, A T Wall, Joseph K Lim, Emily A Wang, R Douglas Bruce, Gregg S Gonsalves
Prisoners bear much of the burden of the hepatitis C epidemic in the United States. Yet little is known about the scope and cost of treating hepatitis C in state prisons-particularly since the release of direct-acting antiviral medications. In the forty-one states whose departments of corrections reported data, 106,266 inmates (10 percent of their prisoners) were known to have hepatitis C on or about January 1, 2015. Only 949 (0.89 percent) of those inmates were being treated. Prices for a twelve-week course of direct-acting antivirals such as sofosbuvir and the combination drug ledipasvir/sofosbuvir varied widely as of September 30, 2015 ($43,418-$84,000 and $44,421-$94,500, respectively)...
October 1, 2016: Health Affairs
Christine Tartaro, David Lester
Despite the level of supervision of inmates on death row, their suicide rate is higher than both the male prison population in the United States and the population of males over the age of 14 in free society. This study presents suicide data for death row inmates from 1978 through 2010. For the years 1978 through 2010, suicide rates on death row were higher than that for the general population of males over the age of 15 and for state prisons for all but 2 years.
October 3, 2016: Journal of Forensic Sciences
Verner S Westerberg, Barbara S McCrady, Mandy Owens, Paul Guerin
Because it is not common in the U.S. for jails to allow inmates to continue opioid medications that have been started in the community, we aimed to assess whether inmates maintained on methadone showed different rates of recidivism, lengths of incarceration, and types of offenses than other incarcerated groups. We also analyzed rates of return to home clinics after release. In order to answer these questions this study used extant data from 960 adult inmates in a large metropolitan detention center who were in 1 of 4 groups: general population with no known substance use disorders, alcohol detoxification, methadone maintenance (MMT), and opioid detoxification...
November 2016: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Hannes Bielas, Steffen Barra, Christine Skrivanek, Marcel Aebi, Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, Cornelia Bessler, Belinda Plattner
BACKGROUND: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and psychiatric disorders are common in juvenile detainees. Emotional dysregulation resulting from cumulated ACEs may be characterized by symptoms of irritability. The present study examined whether the accumulation of ACEs, irritability, or both predicted mental disorders in incarcerated adolescents with and without controlling for one another and for socio-demographic factors. METHODS: One hundred thirty male detained juvenile offenders (aged 13...
2016: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
Guillaume MuasaPatoka Kalonji, Gérard De Connick, Léon Okenge Ngongo, Dieudonné Kazumba Nsaka, Thierry Kabengele, Félicien Tshimungu Kandolo, Félicien Ilunga-Ilunga, Albert Adelin, Didier Giet
BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis still remains a major public health concern in several provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo, especially in prison settings. The present study aimed at determining tuberculosis (TB) prevalence and associated risk factors in inmates of the Mbuji-Mayi Central Prison. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed over a 6-month period (January to June 2015) in Mbuji-Mayi Central Prison. A total of 733 inmates were screened systematically for TB...
2016: Tropical Medicine and Health
Stephanie M Topp, Clement N Moonga, Constance Mudenda, Nkandu Luo, Michael Kaingu, Chisela Chileshe, George Magwende, Jody S Heymann, German Henostroza
BACKGROUND: Research exploring the drivers of health outcomes of women who are in prison in low- and middle-income settings is largely absent. This study aimed to identify and examine the interaction between structural, organisational and relational factors influencing Zambian women prisoners' health and healthcare access. METHODS: We conducted in-depth interviews of 23 female prisoners across four prisons, as well as 21 prison officers and health care workers. The prisoners were selected in a multi-stage sampling design with a purposive selection of prisons followed by a random sampling of cells and of female inmates within cells...
September 26, 2016: International Journal for Equity in Health
Susan Baidawi, Christopher Trotter
Physical and functional health issues among older prisoners may be difficult to address in an environment designed for younger inmates. This article investigates the relationships between older prisoners' health, their experiences of the prison environment and health services, and their levels of psychological distress. One hundred and seventy-three older prisoners (aged 50 years and older) from eight Australian prisons were interviewed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, with additional information collected from prisoner interviews and correctional health files...
October 2016: Journal of Correctional Health Care
Tarita N Collins, Joshua B Avondoglio, Linda M Terry
Mentally ill patients are entering the criminal justice system at alarming rates, representing a significant percentage of those incarcerated. Correctional facilities are mandated to provide mental health treatment to inmates. The increasing number of inmate patients has made psychiatry an important part of institutional operations. Psychiatrists are called to provide psychopharmacological interventions to aid in the safe operation of institutions and provide effective treatment to those with mental illness...
September 27, 2016: International Review of Psychiatry
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