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Child* SLI

Mabel L Rice
Future perspectives on children with language impairments are framed from what is known about children with specific language impairment (SLI). A summary of the current state of services is followed by discussion of how these children can be overlooked and misunderstood and consideration of why it is so hard for some children to acquire language when it is effortless for most children. Genetic influences are highlighted, with the suggestion that nature plus nurture should be considered in present as well as future intervention approaches...
November 2016: Seminars in Speech and Language
Christina N Meyers-Denman, Elena Plante
Purpose: Dosage has been identified as an important element of treatment that may affect treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dose schedule for treatment of grammatical morphology deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Sixteen 4-to-5-year-old children with SLI participated in a 5-week intervention consisting of equivalent daily Enhanced Conversational Recast treatment (Plante et al., 2014) targeting grammatical morphology...
October 4, 2016: Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools
Lian van Berkel-van Hoof, Daan Hermans, Harry Knoors, Ludo Verhoeven
BACKGROUND: Augmentative signs may facilitate word learning in children with vocabulary difficulties, for example, children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH) and children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Despite the fact that augmentative signs may aid second language learning in populations with a typical language development, empirical evidence in favor of this claim is lacking. AIMS: We aim to investigate whether augmentative signs facilitate word learning for DHH children, children with SLI, and typically developing (TD) children...
September 23, 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
Monik Favart, Anna Potocki, Lucie Broc, Pauline Quémart, Josie Bernicot, Thierry Olive
The goal of this study was to investigate the management of cohesion by children and adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) when writing a narrative in a communicative situation. Twelve children with SLI (from 7 to 11 years old) and 12 adolescents with SLI (from 12 to 18 years old) were chronological age-matched with 24 typically developing (TD) children and 24 TD adolescents. All participants attended mainstream classes: children in elementary schools and adolescents in middle and high schools...
September 23, 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
Gillian M Clark, Jarrad A G Lum
Objective: A core claim of the procedural deficit hypothesis of specific language impairment (SLI) is that the disorder is associated with poor implicit sequence learning. This study investigated whether implicit sequence learning problems in SLI are present for first-order conditional (FOC) and higher order conditional (HOC) sequences. Method: Twenty-five children with SLI and 27 age-matched, nonlanguage-impaired children completed 2 serial reaction time tasks. On 1 version, the sequence to be implicitly learnt comprised a FOC sequence and on the other a HOC sequence...
September 19, 2016: Neuropsychology
Dolors Girbau
Eleven native Spanish-speaking children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) (8;3-10;11) and 11 typically developing children (8;7-10;8) received a comprehensive psycholinguistic evaluation. Participants listened to either Direct Object (DO) pronoun sentences or filler sentences without any pronoun, and they decided whether a picture on the screen (depicting the antecedent, another noun in the sentence, or an unrelated object) was 'alive'. They answered comprehension questions about pronoun sentences. Children with SLI showed significantly poorer comprehension of DO pronoun sentences when answering comprehension questions than children with Typical Language Development (TLD)...
September 16, 2016: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
Eileen Haebig, Audra Sterling, Jill Hoover
Purpose: One aspect of morphosyntax, finiteness marking, was compared in children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), specific language impairment (SLI), and typical development matched on mean length of utterance (MLU). Method: Nineteen children with typical development (mean age = 3.3 years), 20 children with SLI (mean age = 4.9 years), and 17 boys with FXS (mean age = 11.9 years) completed the Test of Early Grammatical Impairment (TEGI; Rice & Wexler, 2001), and other cognitive and language assessments...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
Lise Desmottes, Christelle Maillart, Thierry Meulemans
In this study, the time course of the procedural learning of a visuomotor sequence skill was followed over a 24-hour and a 1-week time period in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Two aspects of memory consolidation in implicit sequence learning were examined: the evolution of post-training gains in sequence knowledge (Experiment 1) and the susceptibility to interference (Experiment 2). In the first experiment, 18 children with SLI and 17 control children matched for sex, age, and nonverbal intelligence completed a serial reaction-time (SRT) task and were tested 24 hours and 1 week after practicing...
September 10, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Rita Obeid, Patricia J Brooks, Kasey L Powers, Kristen Gillespie-Lynch, Jarrad A G Lum
Impairments in statistical learning might be a common deficit among individuals with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Using meta-analysis, we examined statistical learning in SLI (14 studies, 15 comparisons) and ASD (13 studies, 20 comparisons) to evaluate this hypothesis. Effect sizes were examined as a function of diagnosis across multiple statistical learning tasks (Serial Reaction Time, Contextual Cueing, Artificial Grammar Learning, Speech Stream, Observational Learning, and Probabilistic Classification)...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Natalya Kaganovich, Jennifer Schumaker, Courtney Rowland
BACKGROUND: Visual speech cues influence different aspects of language acquisition. However, whether developmental language disorders may be associated with atypical processing of visual speech is unknown. In this study, we used behavioral and ERP measures to determine whether children with a history of SLI (H-SLI) differ from their age-matched typically developing (TD) peers in the ability to match auditory words with corresponding silent visual articulations. METHODS: Nineteen 7-13-year-old H-SLI children and 19 age-matched TD children participated in the study...
2016: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Juan J Buiza, María José Rodríguez-Parra, Mercedes González-Sánchez, José A Adrián
BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is very complex, given the variety of clinical pictures described in this disorder. Knowledge about the linguistic markers of SLI can facilitate its differentiation from the normal profile of language development. These markers can also be used as tools that may improve diagnostic. AIMS: To determine which psycholinguistic markers best discriminate Spanish-speaking children with SLI from children with typical language development...
November 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
Manuela Lavelli, Marinella Majorano
PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to investigate the role that cospeech gestures play in lexical production in preschool-age children with expressive specific language impairment (E-SLI). METHOD: Fifteen preschoolers with E-SLI and 2 groups of typically developing (TD) children matched for chronological age (n = 15, CATD group) and for language abilities (n = 15, LATD group) completed a picture-naming task. The accuracy of the spoken answers (coded for types of correct and incorrect answers), the modality of expression (spoken and/or gestural), types of gestures, and semantic relationship between gestures and speech produced by children in the different groups were compared...
August 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
Suzanne R Jongman, Ardi Roelofs, Annette R Scheper, Antje S Meyer
BACKGROUND: Children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems not only with language performance but also with sustained attention, which is the ability to maintain alertness over an extended period of time. Although there is consensus that this ability is impaired with respect to processing stimuli in the auditory perceptual modality, conflicting evidence exists concerning the visual modality. AIMS: To address the outstanding issue whether the impairment in sustained attention is limited to the auditory domain, or if it is domain-general...
August 16, 2016: International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
Safiyyah Abdul Aziz, Janet Fletcher, Donna M Bayliss
BACKGROUND: Past research with children with specific language impairment (SLI) has shown them to have poorer planning and problem-solving ability, and delayed self-regulatory speech (SRS) relative to their typically developing (TD) peers. However, the studies are few in number and are restricted in terms of the number and age range of participants, which limits our understanding of the nature and extent of any delays. Moreover, no study has examined the performance of a significant subset of children with SLI, those who have hyperactive and inattentive behaviours...
August 11, 2016: International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
Lyndall Mollart, Jon Adams, Maralyn Foureur
UNLABELLED: Feasibility randomised controlled trials of complementary medicine are important to evaluate acceptability and practicality. This study examined participants' and health professionals' perceptions of CAM and participation in a feasibility RCT of acupressure for labour onset. METHODS: A qualitative study incorporated within an RCT. Data were collected from postnatal women via questionnaires and health professionals via focus groups. RESULTS: Four themes emerged from the women's views: "Using CAM to start labour", "Feeling empowered through action", "Desiring randomisation to acupressure group", and "Welcoming the opportunity to assist in research"...
August 2016: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, Fred Genesee, Ludo Verhoeven
Children with developmental disabilities (DD) often need and sometimes opt to become bilingual. The context for bilingual acquisition varies considerably and can impact outcomes. In this first article of the special issue, we review research on the timing and amount of bilingual exposure and outcomes of either direct language intervention or educational placements in three groups of children with DD: Specific Language Impairment (SLI), Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and Down syndrome (DS). Children with SLI have been studied more than the other two groups...
July 18, 2016: Journal of Communication Disorders
Marika A Kuusisto, Pirkko E Nieminen, Mika T Helminen, Leenamaija Kleemola
BACKGROUND: Earlier research and clinical practice show that specific language impairment (SLI) is often associated with nonverbal cognitive deficits and weakened skills in executive functions (EFs). Executive deficits may have a remarkable influence on a child's everyday activities in the home and school environments. However, research information is still limited on EFs in school-aged children with SLI, mostly conducted among English- and Dutch-speaking children. AIMS: To study whether there are differences in EFs between Finnish-speaking children with SLI and typically developing (TD) peers at school age...
July 18, 2016: International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
Nathalie Bedoin, Lucie Brisseau, Pauline Molinier, Didier Roch, Barbara Tillmann
Children with developmental language disorders have been shown to be also impaired in rhythm and meter perception. Temporal processing and its link to language processing can be understood within the dynamic attending theory. An external stimulus can stimulate internal oscillators, which orient attention over time and drive speech signal segmentation to provide benefits for syntax processing, which is impaired in various patient populations. For children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and dyslexia, previous research has shown the influence of an external rhythmic stimulation on subsequent language processing by comparing the influence of a temporally regular musical prime to that of a temporally irregular prime...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Maria Kambanaros, Michalis Michaelides, Kleanthes K Grohmann
BACKGROUND: Clinicians globally recognize as exceptionally challenging the development of effective intervention practices for bi- or multilingual children with specific language impairment (SLI). Therapy in both or all of an impaired child's languages is rarely possible. An alternative is to develop treatment protocols that facilitate the transfer of therapy effects from a treated language to an untreated language. AIMS: To explore whether cognates, words that share meaning and phonological features across languages, could be used to boost lexical retrieval in the context of multilingual SLI...
July 5, 2016: International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
Guifang Fu, Nicholas J A Wan, Joseph M Baker, James W Montgomery, Julia L Evans, Ronald B Gillam
Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a neuroimaging technology that enables investigators to indirectly monitor brain activity in vivo through relative changes in the concentration of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. One of the key features of fNIRS is its superior temporal resolution, with dense measurements over very short periods of time (100 ms increments). Unfortunately, most statistical analysis approaches in the existing literature have not fully utilized the high temporal resolution of fNIRS...
2016: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
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