keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Child* SLI

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28727489/third-person-singular-s-in-typical-development-and-specific-language-impairment-input-and-neighbourhood-density
#1
Justin B Kueser, Laurence B Leonard, Patricia Deevy
The purpose of this study was to examine factors promoting the use of third person singular -s by 23 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 21 children with typical development (TD). Relative proportions of third person singular -s forms in the input (input proportion) were calculated for 25 verbs based on data from an American English corpus of child-directed speech. Neighbourhood density values were also collected for these verbs. With previously collected probes of third person singular -s use for each of these verbs, we found with logistic regression that input proportion was positively associated with the likelihood of third person singular -s use for both groups...
July 20, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724132/applying-an-integrative-framework-of-executive-function-to-preschoolers-with-specific-language-impairment
#2
Leah L Kapa, Elena Plante, Kevin Doubleday
Purpose: The first goal of this research was to compare verbal and nonverbal executive function abilities between preschoolers with and without specific language impairment (SLI). The second goal was to assess the group differences on 4 executive function components in order to determine if the components may be hierarchically related as suggested within a developmental integrative framework of executive function. Method: This study included 26 4- and 5-year-olds diagnosed with SLI and 26 typically developing age- and sex-matched peers...
July 19, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715546/sensitivity-to-audiovisual-temporal-asynchrony-in-children-with-a-history-of-specific-language-impairment-and-their-peers-with-typical-development-a-replication-and-follow-up-study
#3
Natalya Kaganovich
Purpose: Earlier, my colleagues and I showed that children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI) are significantly less able to detect audiovisual asynchrony compared with children with typical development (TD; Kaganovich & Schumaker, 2014). Here, I first replicate this finding in a new group of children with H-SLI and TD and then examine a relationship among audiovisual function, attention skills, and language in a combined pool of children. Method: The stimuli were a pure tone and an explosion-shaped figure...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28702677/shortened-nonword-repetition-task-nwr-s-a-simple-quick-and-less-expensive-outcome-to-identify-children-with-combined-specific-language-and-reading-impairment
#4
Carlijn M P le Clercq, Marc P van der Schroeff, Judith E Rispens, Liesbet Ruytjens, André Goedegebure, Gijs van Ingen, Marie-Christine Franken
Purpose: The purpose of this research note was to validate a simplified version of the Dutch nonword repetition task (NWR; Rispens & Baker, 2012). The NWR was shortened and scoring was transformed to correct/incorrect nonwords, resulting in the shortened NWR (NWR-S). Method: NWR-S and NWR performance were compared in the previously published data set of Rispens and Baker (2012; N = 88), who compared NWR performance in 5 participant groups: specific language impairment (SLI), reading impairment (RI), both SLI and RI, one control group matched on chronological age, and one control group matched on language age...
July 12, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28690687/the-role-of-nonverbal-working-memory-in-morphosyntactic-processing-by-children-with-specific-language-impairment-and-autism-spectrum-disorders
#5
Susan Ellis Weismer, Meghan M Davidson, Ishanti Gangopadhyay, Heidi Sindberg, Hettie Roebuck, Margarita Kaushanskaya
BACKGROUND: Both children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and children with specific language impairment (SLI) have been shown to have difficulties with grammatical processing. A comparison of these two populations with neurodevelopmental disorders was undertaken to examine similarities and differences in the mechanisms that may underlie grammatical processing. Research has shown that working memory (WM) is recruited during grammatical processing. The goal of this study was to examine morphosyntactic processing on a grammatical judgment task in children who varied in clinical diagnosis and language abilities and to assess the extent to which performance is predicted by nonverbal working memory (WM)...
2017: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28672377/case-history-risk-factors-for-specific-language-impairment-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#6
Johanna M Rudolph
Purpose: Research suggests that the best approach to early identification of children with specific language impairment (SLI) should include assessment of risk factors. However, previous attempts to develop a list for this purpose have been unsuccessful. In this study, systematic review and meta-analytic procedures were used to determine whether any case history factors can be used to identify toddlers at risk of developing SLI. Method: Epidemiological studies that examined the association between risk factors and SLI were identified...
July 3, 2017: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28672043/the-relationship-between-information-carrying-words-memory-and-language-skills-in-school-age-children-with-specific-language-impairment
#7
Pauline Frizelle, Jennifer Harte, Kathleen O'Sullivan, Paul Fletcher, Fiona Gibbon
The receptive language measure information-carrying word (ICW) level, is used extensively by speech and language therapists in the UK and Ireland. Despite this it has never been validated via its relationship to any other relevant measures. This study aims to validate the ICW measure by investigating the relationship between the receptive ICW score of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their performance on standardized memory and language assessments. Twenty-seven children with SLI, aged between 5;07 and 8;11, completed a sentence comprehension task in which the instructions gradually increased in number of ICWs...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631953/a-morpho-phonological-past-tense-processing-as-a-clinical-marker-in-sli-efl-learners
#8
Elena Even-Simkin
The clinical marker in specific language impairment (SLI) population is the subject of considerable debate. SLI is the one of the frequently diagnosed atypical language phenomena found among early school-age children (McArthur et al., 2000; Spear-Swerling, 2006). For example, children with SLI have difficulty applying the Past Tense rule to verbs, even though they can accurately repeat phonologically similar forms of the words (Hoeffner & McClelland, 1993). In this study, I discuss the grammatical deficits in the SLI population by studying the generation of both 'regular' and 'irregular' English Past Tense forms and explain how the rates of the correct use of the 'irregular' versus 'regular' form may be considered as a clinical SLI marker...
February 15, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630655/neural-patterns-elicited-by-sentence-processing-uniquely-characterize-typical-development-sli-recovery-and-sli-persistence
#9
Eileen Haebig, Christine Weber, Laurence B Leonard, Patricia Deevy, J Bruce Tomblin
BACKGROUND: A substantial amount of work has examined language abilities in young children with specific language impairment (SLI); however, our understanding of the developmental trajectory of language impairment is limited. Along with studying the behavioral changes that occur across development, it is important to examine the neural indices of language processing for children with different language trajectories. The current study sought to examine behavioral and neural bases of language processing in adolescents showing three different trajectories: those with normal language development (NL), those exhibiting persistent SLI (SLI-Persistent), and those with a history of SLI who appear to have recovered (SLI-Recovered)...
2017: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590146/insensitivity-to-verb-conjugation-patterns-in-french-children-with-sli
#10
Phaedra Royle, Ariane St-Denis, Patrizia Mazzocca, Alexandra Marquis
Specific language impairment (SLI) is characterised by persistent difficulties that affect language abilities in otherwise normally developing children (Leonard, 2014). It remains challenging to identify young children affected by SLI in French. We tested oral production of the passé composé tense in 19 children in kindergarten and first grade with SLI aged from 5;6 to 7;4 years. All children were schooled in a French environment, but with different linguistic backgrounds. We used an Android application, Jeu de verbes (Marquis et al...
June 7, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28586855/using-pupillometry-to-investigate-sentence-comprehension-in-children-with-and-without-specific-language-impairment
#11
Jarrad A G Lum, George J Youssef, Gillian M Clark
Purpose: In this study pupillometry was used to investigate the allocation of attentional resources associated with sentence comprehension in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Eighteen children with SLI (age: M = 6.4 years) and 18 typically developing (TD) children (age: M = 6.3 years) participated in the study. A sentence comprehension task was presented that comprised items designated as easy or hard. Easy sentences contained 4 or 5 words, and hard sentences contained 6 or 7 words...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510615/the-role-of-frequency-in-learning-morphophonological-alternations-implications-for-children-with-specific-language-impairment
#12
Ekaterina Tomas, Katherine Demuth, Peter Petocz
Purpose: The aim of this article was to explore how the type of allomorph (e.g., past tense buzz[d] vs. nod[əd]) influences the ability to perceive and produce grammatical morphemes in children with typical development and with specific language impairment (SLI). Method: The participants were monolingual Australian English-speaking children. The SLI group included 13 participants (mean age = 5;7 [years;months]); the control group included 19 children with typical development (mean age = 5;4)...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28486125/can-you-spell-dyslexia-without-sli-comparing-the-cognitive-profiles-of-dyslexia-and-specific-language-impairment-and-their-roles-in-learning
#13
Tracy Packiam Alloway, Furtuna Tewolde, Dakota Skipper, David Hijar
The aim of the present study is to explore whether those with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and dyslexia display distinct or overlapping cognitive profiles with respect to learning outcomes. In particular, we were interested in two key cognitive skills associated with academic performance - working memory and IQ. We recruited three groups of children - those with SLI, those with dyslexia, and a control group. All children were given standardized tests of working memory, IQ (vocabulary and matrix), spelling, and math...
June 2017: Research in Developmental Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28486046/grammatical-case-marking-in-japanese-children-with-sli
#14
Aimi Murao, Tomohiko Ito, Suzy E Fukuda, Shinji Fukuda
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not Japanese children with specific language impairment (henceforth; SLI) would in fact experience difficulty with grammatical case-marking. The participants were 10 Japanese children with SLI, aged 7;7 to 11;4, and 25 Japanese children with typical language development (henceforth; TLD), aged 8;11 to 9;11. In this study, a sentence completion task was used, which involved both active and passive sentences with canonical and scrambled word order. The children with SLI were significantly less accurate than those with TLD with the use of grammatical case-markers...
May 9, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481668/the-development-of-writing-skills-in-4-year-old-children-with-and-without-specific-language-impairment
#15
Stacey L Pavelko, R Jane Lieberman, Jamie Schwartz, Debbie Hahs-Vaughn, Chad Nye
Research shows that many preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulty acquiring literacy skills including phonological awareness, print concepts, and alphabet knowledge. Limited research suggests that preschool children with SLI also have difficulty with emergent writing tasks such as name writing and word writing. In typically developing children, research indicates that emergent writing skills are acquired in a developmental sequence: (1) linearity, (2) segmentation, (3) simple characters, (4) left-right orientation, (5) complex characters, (6) random letters, and (7) invented spelling...
May 8, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474204/screening-for-specific-language-impairment-in-preschool-children-evaluating-a-screening-procedure-including-the-token-test
#16
Ulrike Willinger, Michaela Schmoeger, Matthias Deckert, Brigitte Eisenwort, Benjamin Loader, Annemarie Hofmair, Eduard Auff
Specific language impairment (SLI) comprises impairments in receptive and/or expressive language. Aim of this study was to evaluate a screening for SLI. 61 children with SLI (SLI-children, age-range 4-6 years) and 61 matched typically developing controls were tested for receptive language ability (Token Test-TT) and for intelligence (Wechsler Preschool-and-Primary-Scale-of-Intelligence-WPPSI). Group differences were analyzed using t tests, as well as direct and stepwise discriminant analyses. The predictive value of the WPPSI with respect to TT performance was analyzed using regression analyses...
May 4, 2017: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28470886/theory-of-mind-in-sli-revisited-links-with-syntax-comparisons-with-asd
#17
Stephanie Durrleman, Morgane Burnel, Anne Reboul
BACKGROUND: According to the linguistic determinism approach, knowledge of sentential complements such as: John says that the earth is flat plays a crucial role in theory of mind (ToM) development by providing a means to represent explicitly people's mental attitudes and beliefs. This approach predicts that mastery of complements determines successful belief reasoning across explicit ToM tasks, even low-verbal ones, and across populations. AIMS: (1) To investigate the link between a low-verbal ToM-task and complements in Specific Language Impairment (SLI), (2) To determine whether this population shows similar ToM performance to that of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or those with Typical Development (TD) once these groups are matched on competency for complements, (3) To explore whether complements conveying a falsehood without jeopardizing the veracity of the entire sentence, such as complements of verbs of communication, are more crucial for belief attribution than complements which do not have this property, namely complements of verbs of perception, (?John sees that the earth is flat)...
May 4, 2017: International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464253/statistical-word-learning-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorder-and-specific-language-impairment
#18
Eileen Haebig, Jenny R Saffran, Susan Ellis Weismer
BACKGROUND: Word learning is an important component of language development that influences child outcomes across multiple domains. Despite the importance of word knowledge, word-learning mechanisms are poorly understood in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined underlying mechanisms of word learning, specifically, statistical learning and fast-mapping, in school-aged children with typical and atypical development...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441074/assessing-lebanese-bilingual-children-the-use-of-cross-linguistic-lexical-tasks-in-lebanese-arabic
#19
Christel Khoury Aouad Saliby, Christophe Dos Santos, Edith Kouba Hreich, Camille Messarra
Since norms for vocabulary acquisition in Lebanese bilingual children (L1: Lebanese, L2: French and/or English) do not yet exist, clinical assessment based on normative data and using appropriate tools remains difficult for speech and language therapists. The current study focuses on exploring and comparing lexical performances of typically developing Lebanese bilingual children (32 Bi-TD, aged 5;7 to 6;9) and those with specific language impairment (10 Bi-SLI, aged 5;9 to 7;10), using cross-linguistic lexical tasks (LITMUS-CLT, COST Action IS0804, 2011) in Lebanese Arabic language (CLT-LB), specific to the Lebanese context...
April 25, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425302/probing-morphological-syntactic-and-pragmatic-knowledge-through-answers-to-wh-questions-in-children-with-sli
#20
Kelly Rombough, Rosalind Thornton
PURPOSE: This study investigated aspects of morphology, syntax and pragmatics in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). These areas of language were investigated by evaluating children's answers to wh-questions. METHOD: Elicited production methodology was used to evoke answers to three types of wh-questions. There were 54 participants: 18 children with SLI (mean age = 5;3); 18 language-matched children matched on mean length of utterance (mean age = 3;4) and 18 age-matched children (mean age = 5;3)...
February 14, 2017: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
keyword
keyword
80489
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"