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Jessika Santamaria
The data presented in this article relates to the research article, "Evidence of Varroa -mediated Deformed Wing virus spillover in Hawaii" (Santamaria et al., 2017) [3]. The article presents data collected throughout August 2014 to November 2015, on the two Hawaiian Islands of Oahu and Maui. Apis and non- Apis specimens - a total of four species - were collected and tested for Deformed Wing virus (DWV) absence or presence, only. Specific island locations are noted. This data is made publicly available to be analyzed or used in future relevant research...
February 2018: Data in Brief
Noble I Egekwu, Francisco Posada, Daniel E Sonenshine, Steven Cook
Varroa destructor mites (varroa) are ectoparasites of Apis mellifera honey bees, and the damage they inflict on hosts is likely a causative factor of recent poor honey bee colony performance. Research has produced an arsenal of control agents against varroa mites, which have become resistant to many chemical means of their control, and other means have uncertain efficacy. Novel means of control will result from a thorough understanding of varroa physiology and behavior. However, robust knowledge of varroa biology is lacking; mites have very low survivability and reproduction away from their natural environment and host, and few tested protocols of maintaining mites in vitro are available as standardized methods for varroa research...
March 6, 2018: Experimental & Applied Acarology
Bettina Ziegelmann, Elisabeth Abele, Stefan Hannus, Michaela Beitzinger, Stefan Berg, Peter Rosenkranz
A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper.
March 6, 2018: Scientific Reports
Simona Kraberger, Gabriel A Visnovsky, Ron F van Toor, Maketalena F Male, Kara Waits, Rafaela S Fontenele, Arvind Varsani
Varroa destructor is a ubiquitous and parasitic mite of honey bees, infecting them with pathogenic viruses having a major impact on apiculture. We identified two novel circular replication-associated protein (Rep)-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses from V. destructor sampled from a honey bee hive near Christchurch in New Zealand.
March 1, 2018: Genome Announcements
Brenna E Traver, Haley K Feazel-Orr, Katelyn M Catalfamo, Carlyle C Brewster, Richard D Fell
Honey bee, Apis mellifera (L.; Hymenoptera: Apidae), populations are in decline and their losses pose a serious threat for crop pollination and food production. The specific causes of these losses are believed to be multifactorial. Pesticides, parasites and pathogens, and nutritional deficiencies have been implicated in the losses due to their ability to exert energetic stress on bees. While our understanding of the role of these factors in honey bee colony losses has improved, there is still a lack of knowledge of how they impact the immune system of the honey bee...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Zheguang Lin, Yao Qin, Paul Page, Shuai Wang, Li Li, Zhengsheng Wen, Fuliang Hu, Peter Neumann, Huoqing Zheng, Vincent Dietemann
The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor , shifted host from the eastern honeybee, Apis cerana , to the western honeybee, Apis mellifera . Whereas the original host survives infestations by this parasite, they are lethal to colonies of its new host. Here, we investigated a population of A. cerana naturally infested by the V. destructor Korea haplotype that gave rise to the globally invasive mite lineage. Our aim was to better characterize traits that allow for the survival of the original host to infestations by this particular mite haplotype...
February 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Yi Zhang, Richou Han
Varroa destructor mites express strong avoidance of the Apis cerana worker brood in the field. The molecular mechanism for this phenomenon remains unknown. We identified a Varroa toxic protein (VTP), which exhibited toxic activity toward A. cerana worker larvae, in the saliva of these mites, and expressed VTP in an Escherichia coli system. We further demonstrated that recombinant VTP killed A. cerana worker larvae and pupae in the absence of deformed-wing virus (DWV) but was not toxic to A. cerana worker adults and drones...
February 21, 2018: Scientific Reports
Michael Simone-Finstrom, Kate Aronstein, Michael Goblirsch, Frank Rinkevich, Lilia de Guzman
Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations are currently facing unsustainable losses due to a variety of factors. Colonies are challenged with brood pathogens, such as the fungal agent of chalkbrood disease, the microsporidian gut parasite Nosema sp., and several viruses. These pathogens may be transmitted horizontally from worker to worker, vertically from queen to egg and via vectors like the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. Despite the fact that these pathogens are widespread and often harbored in wax comb that is reused from year to year and transferred across beekeeping operations, few, if any, universal treatments exist for their control...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Lilia I de Guzman, Patcharin Phokasem, Kitiphong Khongphinitbunjong, Amanda M Frake, Panuwan Chantawannakul
Successful reproduction by unmated Tropilaelaps mercedesae is reported here for the first time. Of the eight mature daughters that did not have male mates within their natal cells, four produced both mature sons and daughters, and four produced mature daughters only. Overall, 78% of the new daughters that had no egg-laying experience, and 84% of the foundresses that had or had not laid previously reproduced. Both inoculum daughter and foundress mites were collected from tan-bodied pupae and inoculated immediately...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Gun Koleoglu, Paul H Goodwin, Mariana Reyes-Quintana, Mollah Md Hamiduzzaman, Ernesto Guzman-Novoa
Circulating hemocytes are responsible for defensive and healing mechanisms in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Parasitism by the mite Varroa destructor and injection of V. destructor homogenate in buffer, but not buffer injection, showed similar reductions in total hemocyte concentrations in both Africanized and European adult honey bees. This indicated that compounds in V. destructor homogenate can have similar effects as V. destructor parasitism and that the response is not solely due to wounding. Samples from honey bees with different hemocyte concentrations were compared for the expression patterns of hemolectin (AmHml), prophenol oxidase (AmPpo), and class C scavenger receptor (AmSRC-C)...
February 12, 2018: Parasitology Research
Marco Beyer, Jürgen Junk, Michael Eickermann, Antoine Clermont, François Kraus, Carlo Georges, Andreas Reichart, Lucien Hoffmann
Sets of treatments that were applied against varroa mites in the Luxembourgish beekeeper community were surveyed annually with a questionnaire between the winters 2010/11 and 2014/15. The average temperature and the precipitation sum of the month, when the respective varroa control method was applied were considered as co-variables when evaluating the efficacy of varroa control regimes. Success or failure of control regimes was evaluated based on the percentage of colonies lost per apiary in the winter following the treatment(s)...
February 1, 2018: Research in Veterinary Science
Claudia Katharina Häußermann, Bettina Ziegelmann, Peter Rosenkranz
Reproduction in Varroa destructor exclusively takes place within the sealed honey bee brood cell and is, therefore, limited by the duration of the postcapping period. Oogenesis, ontogenetic development and mating must be optimized to ensure the production of as many mated daughter mites as possible. One adult male mite has to mate with up to five sister mites and transfer 30-40 spermatozoa to each female. We analyzed the production and transfer of male spermatozoa during a reproductive cycle by counting all spermatozoa in the genital tracts of the male and daughter mites in 80 worker brood cells at defined times after cell capping...
February 1, 2018: Experimental & Applied Acarology
Clémence Riva, Michel Sokolowski, Julien Normand, Jana Sopkova-de Oliveira Santos, Marie-Pierre Halm-Lemeille
BACKGROUND: The ectoparasitic honey bee mite Varroa destructor is one of the main causes related to the gradual decline of honey bees Apis mellifera. Nowadays, beekeepers utilize a wide range of different synthetic acaricides, organic acids and essential oils to keep mite populations under control. A previous work had shown that pirimicarb could be a new varroacide candidate. The aim of this study was to observe the chronic effects on worker honey bees feeding activity after an oral exposure to 1...
January 31, 2018: Pest Management Science
Elisabeth Fung, Kelly Hill, Katja Hogendoorn, Richard V Glatz, Kathryn R Napier, Matthew I Bellgard, Roberto A Barrero
Bee pollination is critical for improving productivity of one third of all plants or plant products consumed by humans. The health of honey bees is in decline in many countries worldwide, and RNA viruses together with other biological, environmental and anthropogenic factors have been identified as the main causes. The rapid genetic variation of viruses represents a challenge for diagnosis. Thus, application of deep sequencing methods for detection and analysis of viruses has increased over the last years. In this study, we leverage from the innate Dicer-2 mediated antiviral response against viruses to reconstruct complete viral genomes using virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs)...
January 26, 2018: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Maxcy P Nolan, Keith S Delaplane
Parasite dispersal theory draws heavily upon epidemiological SIR models in which host status (susceptible (S), infected (I), or recovered (R)) is used to study parasite dispersal evolution. In contrast to these extrinsically host-centric drivers, in this study we focus on an intrinsic driver, the parasite's reproductive value (predicted future offspring) as a regulator of the extent to which the individual will engage in risky dispersal behaviour. As a model system we use the honeybee Apis mellifera and its ectoparasite, the mite Varroa destructor...
October 2017: Animal Behaviour
Qingyun Diao, Liangxian Sun, Huajun Zheng, Zhijiang Zeng, Shengyue Wang, Shufa Xu, Huoqing Zheng, Yanping Chen, Yuanyuan Shi, Yuezhu Wang, Fei Meng, Qingliang Sang, Lianfei Cao, Fang Liu, Yongqiang Zhu, Wenfeng Li, Zhiguo Li, Congjie Dai, Minjun Yang, Shenglu Chen, Runsheng Chen, Shaowu Zhang, Jay D Evans, Qiang Huang, Jie Liu, Fuliang Hu, Songkun Su, Jie Wu
The Asian honeybee Apis cerana is one of two bee species that have been commercially kept with immense economic value. Here we present the analysis of genomic sequence and transcriptomic exploration for A. cerana as well as the comparative genomic analysis of the Asian honeybee and the European honeybee A. mellifera. The genome and RNA-seq data yield new insights into the behavioral and physiological resistance to the parasitic mite Varroa the evolution of antimicrobial peptides, and the genetic basis for labor division in A...
January 16, 2018: Scientific Reports
Bettina Ziegelmann, Elisabeth Abele, Stefan Hannus, Michaela Beitzinger, Stefan Berg, Peter Rosenkranz
Honey bees are increasingly important in the pollination of crops and wild plants. Recent reports of the weakening and periodical high losses of managed honey bee colonies have alarmed beekeeper, farmers and scientists. Infestations with the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor in combination with its associated viruses have been identified as a crucial driver of these health problems. Although yearly treatments are required to prevent collapses of honey bee colonies, the number of effective acaricides is small and no new active compounds have been registered in the past 25 years...
January 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
Carla Surlis, James C Carolan, Mary Coffey, Kevin Kavanagh
Varroa destructor is a haemophagous ectoparasite of honeybees and is considered a major causal agent of colony losses in Europe and North America. Although originating in Eastern Asia where it parasitizes Apis cerana, it has shifted hosts to the western honeybee Apis mellifera on which it has a greater deleterious effect on the individual and colony level. To investigate this important host-parasite interaction and to determine whether Varroa causes different effects on different castes we conducted a label free quantitative proteomic analysis of Varroa-parasitized and non-parasitized drone and worker Apis mellifera pupae...
December 19, 2017: Journal of Insect Physiology
Emma L Bradford, Craig R Christie, Ewan M Campbell, Alan S Bowman
European honey bees (Apis mellifera) are critically important to global food production by virtue of their pollination services but are severely threatened by deformed wing virus (DWV) especially in the presence of the external parasite Varroa destructor. DWV exists as many viral strains with the two major variants (DWV-A and DWV-B) varying in virulence. A single plasmid standard was constructed containing three sections for the specific determination of DWV-A (VP2 capsid region), DWV-B (IRES) and a conserved region suitable for total DWV (helicase region)...
2017: PloS One
Eugene V Ryabov, Anna K Childers, Yanping Chen, Shayne Madella, Ashrafun Nessa, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, Jay D Evans
RNA viruses impact honey bee health and contribute to elevated colony loss rates worldwide. Deformed wing virus (DWV) and the closely related Varroa destructor virus-1 (VDV1), are the most widespread honey bee viruses. VDV1 is known to cause high rates of overwintering colony losses in Europe, however it was unknown in the United States (US). Using next generation sequencing, we identified VDV1 in honey bee pupae in the US. We tested 603 apiaries the US in 2016 and found that VDV1 was present in 66.0% of them, making it the second most prevalent virus after DWV, which was present in 89...
December 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
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