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Hemicrania continua

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720819/functional-neuroimaging-in-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias
#1
REVIEW
Mark Obermann, Dagny Holle, Steffen Nagel
Functional neuroimaging was able to identify key structures for the pathophysiology of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) including cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing or cranial autonomic features and hemicrania continua. The posterior hypothalamus was the structure most consistently depicted with functional imaging in different states of disease with and without pain. Network-oriented imaging techniques such as resting-state functional resonance imaging were able to show a broader involvement of human trigeminal pain processing in the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of the different TACs, highlighting similarities between this distinct group of primary headache disorders, while also demonstrating the differences in brain activation across these disorders...
April 2018: Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720818/classification-of-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgia-what-has-changed-in-international-classification-of-headache-disorders-3-beta
#2
REVIEW
K Ravishankar
The term "Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgia (TAC)" was first coined by Goadsby and Lipton[1] to include a group of relatively rare primary headache disorders characterized by moderate to severe, short-lived head pain in the trigeminal distribution with unilateral cranial parasympathetic autonomic features, such as lacrimation, rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, eyelid edema, and ptosis. In the current International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta),[2] the TAC group includes cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks (SUNHAs) and their 2 subforms - SUNHAs with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT), SUNHAs with cranial autonomic symptoms (SUNA)...
April 2018: Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720817/overview-of-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias-nosologic-evolution-diagnosis-and-management
#3
REVIEW
Diana Yi-Ting Wei, Jonathan Jia Yuan Ong, Peter James Goadsby
The term trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) encompasses four primary headache disorders - cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), hemicrania continua (HC), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms (SUNA). All of these except HC are characterized by short-lasting headaches. HC is characterized by a continuous unilateral headache that waxes and wanes in its intensity without complete resolution...
April 2018: Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720815/hemicrania-continua
#4
REVIEW
Sanjay Prakash, Bansi Adroja
Hemicrania continua (HC) is an indomethacin responsive primary chronic headache disorder which is currently classified as a subtype of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). It is not very uncommon. There are >1000 cases of HC in the literature, and it constitutes 1.7% of total headache in the clinic settings. Misdiagnosis for HC is very common at all clinical settings. A diagnosis of HC is missed even by neurologists and headache specialists. It is characterized by a continuous strictly unilateral headache with superimposed exacerbations...
April 2018: Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681827/hemicrania-continua-associated-with-classic-scintillating-scotoma
#5
Eva Auffenberg, Friedemann Bender, Tobias Freilinger
Hemicrania continua (HC) is a rare primary headache disorder, characterized by persistent unilateral pain associated with cranial autonomic symptoms and prompt response to indomethacin. While migrainous features (including aura) have been recognized in cluster headache, there have been only single reports of HC with aura. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old man with constant right-sided headache and superimposed exacerbations to severe pain lasting for several hours. Secondary etiologies were excluded, and a diagnosis of HC was established after prompt and complete response to treatment with indomethacin...
January 2018: Case Reports in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29574434/herpes-zoster-ophthalmicus-evolving-into-headache-characterised-as-hemicrania-continua
#6
Sanjay Prakash, Ankit Dave, Hemant Joshi
Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most common chronic complication of herpes zoster infection. However, a few patients may develop different types of pain after herpetic lesions. We are reporting two patients who developed postherpetic hemicrania continua (HC). Case 1: a 54-year-old woman had a 10-month history of continuous left-sided pain with superimposed exacerbations. The pain started with the onset of herpetic lesions in the ophthalmic division. The lesions subsided in a few weeks. However, the pain persisted and it responded exclusively to indomethacin...
March 23, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29562746/hemicrania-continua-case-series-presenting-in-an-orofacial-pain-clinic
#7
Iryna Hryvenko, Andrés R Cervantes-Chavarría, Alan S Law, Donald R Nixdorf
Aim of investigation Hemicrania continua (HC) is an uncommon primary headache and little is known of the characteristics of such patients managed in an orofacial pain setting. This study provides clinical features of HC, its association with other disorders, and treatment outcomes of patients managed in the TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic at the University of Minnesota. Methods A retrospective review of patient records was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of HC and confirmation at follow-up. Results Six of the 1617 new patients seen between 2015 and 2017 met the selection criteria...
January 1, 2018: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29516437/therapeutic-approaches-for-the-management-of-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias
#8
REVIEW
Diana Y Wei, Rigmor H Jensen
Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC) encompasses 4 unique primary headache types: cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms. They are grouped on the basis of their shared clinical features of unilateral headache of varying durations and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. The shared clinical features reflect the underlying activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex...
April 2018: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28942483/the-pathophysiology-of-the-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias-with-clinical-implications
#9
REVIEW
Mads C J Barloese
The hallmark of primary headaches belonging to the group known as the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias is unilateral headache accompanied by cranial autonomic symptoms. Being relatively rare and poorly understood, they represent a clinical challenge, leading to underdiagnosis and undertreatment. While the headache is the most obvious and disabling symptom, it is only part of a complex symptomatology which hints at the involved pathophysiological mechanisms. Activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex results in the aforementioned cranial autonomic symptoms, which are well understood; however, it is obvious that this brainstem reflex is regulated by higher centers that seemingly play a pivotal role in the attacks and the wide range of other symptoms indicating a homeostatic disturbance...
September 23, 2017: Clinical Autonomic Research: Official Journal of the Clinical Autonomic Research Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901169/predictors-of-response-to-occipital-nerve-stimulation-in-refractory-chronic-headache
#10
Sarah Miller, Laurence Watkins, Manjit Matharu
Background Occipital nerve stimulation is a promising treatment for refractory chronic headache disorders, but is invasive and costly. Identifying predictors of response would be useful in selecting patients. We present the results of an open-label prospective cohort study of 100 patients (35 chronic migraine, 33 chronic cluster headache, 20 short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks and 12 hemicrania continua) undergoing occipital nerve stimulation, using a multivariate binary regression analysis to identify predictors of response...
January 1, 2017: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28899205/non-invasive-vagus-nerve-stimulation-for-the-management-of-refractory-primary-chronic-headaches-a-real-world-experience
#11
Michele Trimboli, Adnan Al-Kaisy, Anna P Andreou, Madeleine Murphy, Giorgio Lambru
Background Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation has initial evidence of efficacy in migraine and cluster headache. However, little is known about its role in the management of refractory chronic headaches. Methods We evaluated the preventive and abortive effects of non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in 41 consecutive patients with refractory primary chronic headaches in an open-label prospective clinical audit. Headache diaries were used to collect clinical information. Those who obtained at least 30% reduction in headache days/episodes after three months of treatment were considered responders and were offered treatment continuation...
January 1, 2017: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886860/primary-headache-disorders-part-i-migraine-and-the-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias
#12
Gary W Jay, Robert L Barkin
In Primary Headache Disorders, Part 1, we discuss three of the primary headache disorders using the headache definitions from ICHD-III (Beta): Migraine, with and without aura; its pathophysiology and treatment are discussed. We then discuss the Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias (TACs), including Cluster Headache and Hemicrania Continua, two more primary headache disorders, as well as the other TAC Headaches. We discuss pathophysiology as well as diagnosis, treatment, and pharmacotherapeutic management of these headache diatheses...
November 2017: Disease-a-month: DM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28730562/therapeutical-approaches-to-paroxysmal-hemicrania-hemicrania-continua-and-short-lasting-unilateral-neuralgiform-headache-attacks-a-critical-appraisal
#13
REVIEW
Carlo Baraldi, Lanfranco Pellesi, Simona Guerzoni, Maria Michela Cainazzo, Luigi Alberto Pini
BACKGROUND: Hemicrania continua (HC), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short lasting neuralgiform headache attacks (SUNCT and SUNA) are rare syndromes with a difficult therapeutic approach. The aim of this review is to summarize all articles dealing with treatments for HC, PH, SUNCT and SUNA, comparing them in terms of effectiveness and safety. METHODS: A survey was performed using the pubmed database for documents published from the 1st January 1989 onwards. All types of articles were considered, those ones dealing with symptomatic cases and non-English written ones were excluded...
December 2017: Journal of Headache and Pain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721092/hemicrania-continua-clinical-review-diagnosis-and-management
#14
REVIEW
Sanjay Prakash, Payal Patel
Hemicrania continua (HC) is an indomethacin-responsive primary headache disorder which is currently classified under the heading of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). It is a highly misdiagnosed and underreported primary headache. The pooled mean delay of diagnosis of HC is 8.0 ± 7.2 years. It is not rare. We noted more than 1000 cases in the literature. It represents 1.7% of total headache patients attending headache or neurology clinic. Just like other TACs, it is characterized by strictly unilateral pain in the trigeminal distribution, cranial autonomic features in the same area and agitation during exacerbations/attacks...
2017: Journal of Pain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681219/lash-a-review-of-the-current-literature
#15
REVIEW
William Kingston, Rashmi Halker
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and explain our current understanding of a very rare disorder, long-lasting autonomic symptoms with associated hemicranias (LASH). RECENT FINDINGS: At present, there are four known cases in the literature of LASH. Its characteristics and reported response to indomethacin link it most closely to the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Its pathophysiology and epidemiology remain unclear. Variance in the pain and autonomic symptom relationship in the existing TAC literature along with the reports of TAC sine headache suggests that LASH may represent a far end of the spectrum of TACs, with most similarities to paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and hemicrania continua (HC)...
August 2017: Current Pain and Headache Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542727/tics-in-tacs-a-step-into-an-avalanche-systematic-literature-review-and-conclusions
#16
Christian Wöber
BACKGROUND: Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) comprise cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks, and hemicrania continua. In some cases, trigeminal neuralgia (TN, "tic douloureux") or TN-like pain may co-occur with TACs. AIM: This article will review the co-occurrence and overlap of TACs and tics in order to contribute to a better understanding of the issue and an improved management of the patients. METHODS: For performing a systematic literature review Pubmed was searched using a total of ten terms...
May 19, 2017: Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28501097/orofacial-pain-and-headaches-associated-with-exfoliation-glaucoma
#17
Noboru Noma, Mayumi Iwasa, Andrew Young, Mariko Ikeda, Yung-Chu Hsu, Maasa Yamamoto, Kenji Inoue, Yoshiki Imamura
BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW: Exfoliation syndrome is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma. The authors report a case of exfoliation glaucoma in a patient who had orofacial pain. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 77-year-old woman was treated at the orofacial pain clinic for left-sided facial pain and headaches of 7 months' duration. Her cataracts and open-angle glaucoma had been diagnosed approximately 3 years earlier. Her main symptoms were orofacial pain, eye redness, inflammation of the eyelids, and eyelid edema...
December 2017: Journal of the American Dental Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474987/idiopathic-hypertrophic-pachymeningitis-mimicking-hemicrania-continua-an-unusual-clinical-case
#18
Antonio Russo, Marcello Silvestro, Mario Cirillo, Alessandro Tessitore, Gioacchino Tedeschi
Background Hemicrania continua (HC) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by a unilateral, moderate, continuous headache with exacerbations marked by migrainous and cranial autonomic symptoms. However, clinical phenotypes similar to primary HC may be subtended by several disorders. Case report We report the case of a 62-year-old man experiencing, over the previous year, a headache completely consistent with HC and its absolute responsiveness to indomethacin therapy. Later, the patient developed diplopia caused by sixth cranial nerve palsy ipsilateral to headache...
April 2018: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168240/cracked-tooth-syndrome-mimicking-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgia-a-report-of-four-cases
#19
Noboru Noma, Kohei Shimizu, Kosuke Watanabe, Andrew Young, Yoshiki Imamura, Junad Khan
BACKGROUND: This report describes four cases of cracked tooth syndrome secondary to traumatic occlusion that mimicked trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. All patients were referred by general practitioners to the Orofacial Pain Clinic at Nihon University Dental School for assessment of atypical facial pain. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Case 1: A 51-year-old woman presented with severe pain in the maxillary and mandibular left molars. Case 2: A 47-year-old woman presented with sharp, shooting pain in the maxillary left molars, which radiated to the temple and periorbital region...
2017: Quintessence International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28128461/cluster-headache-and-other-tacs-pathophysiology-and-neurostimulation-options
#20
REVIEW
Miguel Ja Láinez, Edelmira Guillamón
BACKGROUND: The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are highly disabling primary headache disorders. There are several issues that remain unresolved in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the TACs, although activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex and ipsilateral hypothalamic activation both play a central role. The discovery of the central role of the hypothalamus led to its use as a therapeutic target. After the good results obtained with hypothalamic stimulation, other peripheral neuromodulation targets were tried in the management of refractory cluster headache (CH) and other TACs...
February 2017: Headache
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