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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29168211/factors-associated-with-medication-administration-errors-and-why-nurses-fail-to-report-them
#1
Baraa M Hammoudi, Samantha Ismaile, Omar Abu Yahya
BACKGROUND: Patient safety is a significant challenge facing healthcare systems. The administration of medication is pivotal to patient safety, and errors in drug administration are associated with mortality and morbidity. In this study, we assessed the factors contributing to the occurrence and reporting of medication errors from the nurse's perspective. METHODS: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we distributed a validated questionnaire to 367 nurses at a large public hospital and obtained a response rate of 73...
November 22, 2017: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141619/seasonal-influenza-vaccination-of-healthcare-workers-systematic-review-of-qualitative-evidence
#2
Theo Lorenc, David Marshall, Kath Wright, Katy Sutcliffe, Amanda Sowden
BACKGROUND: Most countries recommend that healthcare workers (HCWs) are vaccinated seasonally against influenza in order to protect themselves and patients. However, in many cases coverage remains low. A range of strategies have been implemented to increase uptake. Qualitative evidence can help in understanding the context of interventions, including why interventions may fail to achieve the desired effect. This study aimed to synthesise evidence on HCWs' perceptions and experiences of vaccination for seasonal influenza...
November 15, 2017: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29130479/implementing-models-of-geriatric-care-behind-the-scenes
#3
Joshua Chodosh, Michael Weiner
Innovative geriatric clinical programs have proliferated in the 21st century, and many have been highlighted in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS). The Affordable Care Act has supported the accelerated innovation of publicized and unpublicized program development, adaptation, and implementation. Many JAGS articles report work conducted in programs with significant improvements in quality; high satisfaction for patients and providers; and for some, reductions in costs. Despite considerable detail, enabling implementers to attempt to adopt reported programs or adapt them to local environments, much less is typically conveyed about the subtleties of the implementation process that led to a successful outcome...
November 11, 2017: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29026454/opportunities-and-obstacles-using-a-clinical-decision-support-system-for-maternal-care-in-burkina-faso
#4
S Alphonse Zakane, Lars L Gustafsson, Ali Sie, Göran Tomson, Svetla Loukanova, Pia Bastholm-Rahmner
OBJECTIVE: Maternal and neonatal mortality is high in sub-Saharan Africa. To support Healthcare Workers (HCWs), a computerized decision support system (CDSS) was piloted at six rural maternal care units in Burkina Faso. During the two years of the study period, it was apparent from reports that the CDSS was not used regularly in clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the reasons why HCWs failed to use the CDSS. METHODS: A workshop, organized as group discussions and a plenary session, was performed with 13 participants to understand their experience with the CDSS and suggest improvements if pertinent...
2017: Online Journal of Public Health Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28836267/when-and-how-can-real-world-data-analyses-substitute-for-randomized-controlled-trials
#5
Jessica M Franklin, Sebastian Schneeweiss
Regulators consider randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the gold standard for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medications, but their costs, duration, and limited generalizability have caused some to look for alternatives. Real world evidence based on data collected outside of RCTs, such as registries and longitudinal healthcare databases, can sometimes substitute for RCTs, but concerns about validity have limited their impact. Greater reliance on such real world data (RWD) in regulatory decision making requires understanding why some studies fail while others succeed in producing results similar to RCTs...
August 24, 2017: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28830572/the-influence-of-contextual-factors-on-healthcare-quality-improvement-initiatives-what-works-for-whom-and-in-what-setting-protocol-for-a-realist-review
#6
Emma Coles, Mary Wells, Margaret Maxwell, Fiona M Harris, Julie Anderson, Nicola M Gray, Gill Milner, Stephen MacGillivray
BACKGROUND: Context shapes the effectiveness of knowledge implementation and influences health improvement. Successful healthcare quality improvement (QI) initiatives frequently fail to transfer to different settings, with local contextual factors often cited as the cause. Understanding and overcoming contextual barriers is therefore crucial to implementing effective improvement; yet context is still poorly understood. There is a paucity of information on the mechanisms underlying how and why QI projects succeed or fail in given settings...
August 23, 2017: Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632512/why-current-drug-adherence-programs-fail-addressing-psychological-risk-factors-of-nonadherence
#7
Antje D Arlt, Yvonne Nestoriuc, Winfried Rief
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide an overview of a selection of largely neglected psychological risk factors for nonadherence, and to offer new approaches to improve medication adherence. RECENT FINDINGS: Current adherence research and intervention programs focus on a few risk factors for nonadherence, such as complexity of the drug regimen. In addition, other important risk factors of nonadherence are neglected or insufficiently addressed. There is good evidence for the significant role of the quality of the patient-healthcare provider relationship...
September 2017: Current Opinion in Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28367748/conceptions-of-agency-and-constraint-for-hiv-positive-patients-and-healthcare-workers-to-support-long-term-engagement-with-antiretroviral-therapy-care-in-khayelitsha-south-africa
#8
Erin Stern, Christopher Colvin, Nobom Gxabagxaba, Charlotte Schutz, Rosie Burton, Graeme Meintjes
In the context of the optimism around antiretroviral therapy (ART) as prevention of HIV/AIDS, addressing the barriers to long-term ART adherence is critical. This is particularly important given the tendency to individualise or use a blame discourse when exploring why HIV-infected patients "fail" to adequately adhere to ART, and not sufficiently exploring contextual reasons for poor adherence that may require varying solutions. This study took place at three clinics and one hospital in Khayelitsha, South Africa, to document the contextual factors that challenged ART adherence in this community...
March 2017: African Journal of AIDS Research: AJAR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104997/poverty-related-diseases-prds-unravelling-complexities-in-disease-responses-in-cameroon
#9
Valerie Makoge, Harro Maat, Lenneke Vaandrager, Maria Koelen
BACKGROUND: In Cameroon, poverty-related diseases (PRDs) are a major public health concern. Research and policies addressing PRDs are based on a particular understanding of the interaction between poverty and disease, usually an association between poverty indicators and health indicators for a specific country or region. Such indicators are useful but fail to explain the nature of the linkages between poverty and disease or poverty and health. This paper presents results of a study among university students, unravelling how they perceive diseases, the linkages with poverty, their responses to diseases and the motivations behind reported responses...
2017: Tropical Medicine and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896539/why-health-and-social-care-support-for-people-with-long-term-conditions-should-be-oriented-towards-enabling-them-to-live-well
#10
Vikki A Entwistle, Alan Cribb, John Owens
There are various reasons why efforts to promote "support for self-management" have rarely delivered the kinds of sustainable improvements in healthcare experiences, health and wellbeing that policy leaders internationally have hoped for. This paper explains how the basis of failure is in some respects built into the ideas that underpin many of these efforts. When (the promotion of) support for self-management is narrowly oriented towards educating and motivating patients to adopt the behaviours recommended for disease control, it implicitly reflects and perpetuates limited and somewhat instrumental views of patients...
November 28, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862007/disentangling-patient-and-public-involvement-in-healthcare-decisions-why-the-difference-matters
#11
Mio Fredriksson, Jonathan Q Tritter
Patient and public involvement has become an integral aspect of many developed health systems and is judged to be an essential driver for reform. However, little attention has been paid to the distinctions between patients and the public, and the views of patients are often seen to encompass those of the general public. Using an ideal-type approach, we analyse crucial distinctions between patient involvement and public involvement using examples from Sweden and England. We highlight that patients have sectional interests as health service users in contrast to citizens who engage as a public policy agent reflecting societal interests...
November 11, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855322/standardizing-psycho-medical-torture-during-the-war-on-terror-why-it-happened-how-it-happened-and-why-it-didn-t-work
#12
Myles Balfe
After 9/11/2001 the United States launched a global War on Terror. As part of this War, terrorism suspects were detained by the U.S. military and by the C.I.A. It is now widely recognized that the United States tortured a number of these detainees in the context of its 'enhanced interrogation' programme. This article examines how and why U.S. organizations developed standards that allowed healthcare professionals to become involved in torture; why the standards developed by U.S. security institutions failed to control the actions of enhanced interrogation personnel on the ground; and what the role of standards were in stopping the enhanced interrogation initiative...
December 2016: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27795754/before-sustainable-development-goals-sdg-why-nigeria-failed-to-achieve-the-millennium-development-goals-mdgs
#13
Obinna Ositadimma Oleribe, Simon David Taylor-Robinson
World leaders adopted the UN Millennium Declaration in 2000, which committed the nations of the world to a new global partnership, aimed at reducing extreme poverty and other time-bound targets, with a stated deadline of 2015. Fifteen years later, although significant progress has been made worldwide, Nigeria is lagging behind for a variety of reasons, including bureaucracy, poor resource management in the healthcare system, sequential healthcare worker industrial action, Boko Haram insurgency in the north of Nigeria and kidnappings in the south of Nigeria...
2016: Pan African Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27790862/a-critical-analysis-of-the-failure-of-nurses-to-raise-concerns-about-poor-patient-care
#14
Marc Roberts
The occurrence of poor patient care is emerging as one of the most significant, challenging, and critical issues confronting contemporary nursing and those responsible for the provision of health care more generally. Indeed, as a consequence of the increased recognition of the manner in which nurses can be implicated in the occurrence of poor patient care, there has been sustained critical debate that seeks to understand how such healthcare failings can occur and, in particular, why nurses seemingly fail to intervene, raise concerns, and effectively respond to prevent the occurrence and continuation of such poor patient care...
July 2017: Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686003/why-do-entrepreneurial-mhealth-ventures-in-the-developing-world-fail-to-scale
#15
Phillip Sundin, Jonathan Callan, Khanjan Mehta
Telemedicine is an increasingly common approach to improve healthcare access in developing countries with fledgling healthcare systems. Despite the strong financial, logistical and clinical support from non-governmental organisations (NGOs), government ministries and private actors alike, the majority of telemedicine projects do not survive beyond the initial pilot phase and achieve their full potential. Based on a review of 35 entrepreneurial telemedicine and mHealth ventures, and 17 reports that analyse their operations and challenges, this article provides a narrative review of recurring failure modes, i...
October 2016: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27567975/what-systems-participants-know-about-access-and-service-entry-and-why-managers-should-listen
#16
Rohena Duncombe
Objective The present study looked at the views of people directly involved in the entry process for community health counselling using the frame of the health access literature. The concurrence of system participants' views with the access literature highlights access issues, particularly for people who are vulnerable or disadvantaged. The paper privileges the voices of the system participants, inviting local health services to consider using participatory design to improve access at the entry point.Methods People involved in the entry process for community health counselling explored the question, 'What, for you, are the features of a good intake system?' They also commented on themes identified during pilot interviews...
August 29, 2016: Australian Health Review: a Publication of the Australian Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27425643/the-oxidative-stress-theory-of-disease-levels-of-evidence-and-epistemological-aspects
#17
REVIEW
Pietro Ghezzi, Vincent Jaquet, Fabrizio Marcucci, Harald H H W Schmidt
The theory that oxidative stress (OS) is at the root of several diseases is extremely popular. However, so far, no antioxidant has been recommended or offered by healthcare systems neither has any been approved as therapy by regulatory agencies that base their decisions on evidence-based medicine. This is simply because, so far, despite many preclinical and clinical studies indicating a beneficial effect of antioxidants in many disease conditions, randomised clinical trials have failed to provide the evidence of efficacy required for drug approval...
June 2017: British Journal of Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27409784/patient-safety-in-acute-care-are-we-going-around-in-circles
#18
REVIEW
James Waldie, Tina Day, Stephen Tee
This article provides a critical discussion examining why adult patients continue to unnecessarily deteriorate and die despite repeated healthcare policy initiatives. After considering the policy background and reviewing current trends in the data, it proposes some solutions that, if enacted, would, the authors believe, have a direct impact on survival rates. Health professionals working in hospitals are failing to recognise signs of physiological deterioration. As a result, adult patients are dying unnecessarily, estimated to be in the region of 1000 a month...
July 14, 2016: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27294745/addressing-the-barriers-to-cervical-cancer-prevention-among-hispanic-women
#19
Natasha Alligood-Percoco, Joshua P Kesterson
OBJECTIVE: Cervical cancer in the USA has transformed from a leading cause of cancer death, to a now largely preventable disease. Despite these advances, however, certain segments of the population, including Hispanic women, continue to be at increased risk. METHODS: A literature review was performed to summarize epidemiologic trends and barriers to care affecting Hispanic women. RESULTS: Hispanic women suffer a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in the USA...
September 2016: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27173972/-they-shouldn-t-be-coming-to-the-ed-should-they-a-qualitative-study-of-why-patients-with-palliative-care-needs-present-to-the-emergency-department
#20
Emilie Green, Sara E Shaw, Tim Harris
INTRODUCTION: Across the developed world, there are concerns about 'inappropriate' use of the emergency department (ED). Patients with palliative care needs frequently attend the ED. Previous studies define the 'reason' for presentation as the 'presenting symptom', which ignores the perspectives of service users. This paper addresses an acknowledged gap in the literature, which fails to examine the decision-making process that brings patients to the ED. METHODS: In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 7 patients (known to a specialist palliative care service and presenting to the ED during a 10-week period) and 2 informal caregivers...
May 12, 2016: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
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