Read by QxMD icon Read

Dementia research

Nikhil Bhalla, Mirella Di Lorenzo, Pedro Estrela, Giordano Pula
Since the discovery of protein kinase activity in 1954, close to 600 kinases have been discovered that have crucial roles in cell physiology. In several pathological conditions, aberrant protein kinase activity leads to abnormal cell and tissue physiology. Therefore, protein kinase inhibitors are investigated as potential treatments for several diseases, including dementia, diabetes, cancer and autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. Modern semiconductor technology has recently been applied to accelerate the discovery of novel protein kinase inhibitors that could become the standard-of-care drugs of tomorrow...
October 22, 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Samanta Lalic, Janet K Sluggett, Jenni Ilomäki, Barbara C Wimmer, Edwin C K Tan, Leonie Robson, Tina Emery, J Simon Bell
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between polypharmacy and medication regimen complexity with time to first hospitalization, number of hospitalizations, and number of hospital days over a 12-month period. DESIGN: A 12-month prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: A total of 383 residents of 6 Australian long-term care facilities (LTCFs). MEASUREMENTS: The primary exposures were polypharmacy (≥9 regular medications) and the 65-item Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI)...
November 1, 2016: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Sun Kyung Kim, Myonghwa Park, Yunhwan Lee, Seong Hye Choi, So Young Moon, Sang Won Seo, Kyung Won Park, Bon D Ku, Hyun Jeong Han, Kee Hyung Park, Seol-Heui Han, Eun-Joo Kim, Jae-Hong Lee, Sun A Park, Yong S Shim, Jong Hun Kim, Chang Hyung Hong, Duk L Na, Byoung Seok Ye, Hee Jin Kim, Yeonsil Moon
BACKGROUND: Personality may predispose family caregivers to experience caregiving differently in similar situations and influence the outcomes of caregiving. A limited body of research has examined the role of some personality traits for health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD) in relation to burden and depression. METHODS: Data from a large clinic-based national study in South Korea, the Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Research (CARE), were analyzed (N = 476)...
October 26, 2016: International Psychogeriatrics
Lauren L Drogos, Stephanie J Gill, Amanda V Tyndall, Jill K Raneri, Jillian S Parboosingh, Aileen Naef, Kyle D Guild, Gail Eskes, Patrick J Hanly, Marc J Poulin
BACKGROUND: It has been estimated that the prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and related dementias will triple by 2035, unless effective interventions or treatments are found for the neurodegenerative disease. Understanding sleep changes as a marker for both AD risk and progression is a burgeoning area of investigation. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that both sleep disturbances and the APOE ε4 allele are associated with increased dementia risk. Previous research has suggested that in AD, individuals carrying the APOE ε4 allele have decreased sleep quality compared to individuals without the APOE ε4 allele...
October 25, 2016: Neurology
Elijah Mak, Silvy Gabel, Habib Mirette, Li Su, Guy B Williams, Adam Waldman, Katie Wells, Karen Ritchie, Craig Ritchie, John O'Brien
The last decade has witnessed a proliferation of neuroimaging studies characterising brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), where both widespread atrophy and 'signature' brain regions have been implicated. In parallel, a prolonged latency period has been established in AD, with abnormal cerebral changes beginning many years before symptom onset. This raises the possibility of early therapeutic intervention, even before symptoms, when treatments could have the greatest effect on disease-course modification...
October 21, 2016: Ageing Research Reviews
Natalie S Ryan, Jennifer M Nicholas, Philip S J Weston, Yuying Liang, Tammaryn Lashley, Rita Guerreiro, Gary Adamson, Janna Kenny, Jon Beck, Lucia Chavez-Gutierrez, Bart de Strooper, Tamas Revesz, Janice Holton, Simon Mead, Martin N Rossor, Nick C Fox
BACKGROUND: The causes of phenotypic heterogeneity in familial Alzheimer's disease with autosomal dominant inheritance are not well understood. We aimed to characterise clinical phenotypes and genetic associations with APP and PSEN1 mutations in symptomatic autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). METHODS: We retrospectively analysed genotypic and phenotypic data (age at symptom onset, initial cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and presence of myoclonus, seizures, pyramidal signs, extrapyramidal signs, and cerebellar signs) from all individuals with ADAD due to APP or PSEN1 mutations seen at the Dementia Research Centre in London, UK...
October 21, 2016: Lancet Neurology
Belinda Goodenough, Richard Fleming, Michael Young, Kim Burns, Cindy Jones, Fallon Forbes
Providing information about latest research via educational sessions to health professionals caring for people with dementia may be insufficient to drive change. This project explored self-reported impacts on practice change of adding information about knowledge translation (KT) to a national dementia education program. Six national workshop days were held. Each provided the option of participating in a Principles of KT and innovation implementation seminar in addition to a clinical topic update (sexualities and dementia, or managing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia)...
October 24, 2016: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education
Susanna Nuvoli, Angela Spanu, Giuseppe Madeddu
As well known, the increase in life expectancy and the better physical condition of people in western countries will lead in the next 20 years to a dramatic development of neurodegenerative diseases, especially of dementia that could be considered one of the most important problems in clinical, social and economic fields for the future. Therefore, the differential diagnosis of the various types of dementia is a critical step for patients, clinicians and researchers since an accurate "in vivo" diagnosis can lead to a better patients management...
October 19, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Stephanie Yamin, Arne Stinchcombe, Sylvain Gagnon
Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) constitute two of the most common forms of dementia in North America. Driving is a primary means of mobility among older adults and the risk of dementia increases with advanced age. The purpose of this paper is to describe the cognitive profile of licensed drivers with mild AD and mild DLB. Method. Licensed drivers with mild AD, mild DLB, and healthy controls completed neuropsychological tests measuring general cognition, attention, visuospatial/perception, language, and cognitive fluctuations...
2016: International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
J Lagarde, M Sarazin
Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) in its behavioral variant (bvFTD) is probably one of the conditions that best illustrates the links between psychiatry and neurology. It is indeed admitted that between a third and half of patients with this condition, especially in early-onset forms, receive an initial diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) and are then referred to a psychiatric ward. BvFTD can thus be considered a neurological disorder with a psychiatric presentation...
October 20, 2016: L'Encéphale
Olivia Blumenfeld Arens, Katharina Fierz, Franziska Zúñiga
BACKGROUND: In special care units (SCUs) for residents with advanced dementia, both personnel and organizations are adapted to the needs of residents. However, whether these adaptations have a preventive effect on elder abuse has not yet been explored. OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of observed emotional abuse, neglect, and physical abuse in Swiss nursing homes, to compare SCUs with non-SCUs concerning the frequency of observed emotional abuse, neglect, and physical abuse, and to explore how resident-related characteristics, staff outcomes/characteristics, and organizational/environmental factors relate to observed elder abuse...
October 22, 2016: Gerontology
Imogen Ovenden, Tom Dening, Charlotte Beer
This qualitative study explored the impact of a Boccia (modified indoor bowls) group on the lives of people with dementia and their carers. Semi-structured interviews with people with dementia (N = 6), carers (N = 10) and the group organisers (N = 6) analysed using thematic analysis revealed four main themes. 'The struggle of being a carer' was relieved by participating in the group and benefitting from the caring support and social aspects of "This group is a family". "The unique nature of Boccia" helped it to provide physical and mental stimulation as well as being an inclusive and enjoyable group...
October 21, 2016: Dementia
Baptiste Brossard, Normand Carpentier
Contemporary research into health and mental health treats diagnosis as a central step in understanding illness management and trajectory; consequently, in the last two decades, sociology of diagnosis has attained increasing influence within medical sociology. Deeply embedded in social constructionism, the set of research divides between those who focus on the social and historical construction of diagnoses as categories, and those who see diagnosis as a process. Regarding the latter, this approach explores the constitution of the medical production, highlighting how it constitutes a starting point for entering a 'sick role', for being labelled, for naming one's problem and by extension, for framing one's illness narrative...
October 22, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
Elizabeth A Evans, Elizabeth Perkins, Pam Clarke, Alina Haines, Ashley Baldwin, Richard Whittington
OBJECTIVE: To determine how care home managers negotiate the conflict between maintaining a safe environment while enabling the autonomy of residents with dementia. This is important because there is limited research with care home managers; yet, they are key agents in the implementation of national policies. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 managers from care homes offering dementia care in the Northwest of England. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach...
October 21, 2016: Aging & Mental Health
Frank J Wolters, Daniel Bos, Meike W Vernooij, Oscar H Franco, Albert Hofman, Peter J Koudstaal, Aad van der Lugt, M Arfan Ikram
The association of aortic valve calcification (AVC) with dementia remains unknown. In 2,428 non-demented participants from the population-based Rotterdam Study, we investigated the association of CT-assessed AVC with risk of dementia and cognitive decline. AVC was present in 33.1% of the population. During a median follow-up of 9.3 years, 160 participants developed dementia. We found no association between presence of AVC and risk of all-cause dementia [hazard ratio (HR): 0.89 (95% confidence interval (CI):0...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Rabeea'h W Aslam, Vickie Bates, Yenal Dundar, Juliet Hounsome, Marty Richardson, Ashma Krishan, Rumona Dickson, Angela Boland, Eleanor Kotas, Joanne Fisher, Sudip Sikdar, Louise Robinson
BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a growing public health concern, and is one of the most distinctive characteristics of all dementias. The timely recognition of dementia syndromes can be beneficial, as some causes of dementia are treatable and are fully or partially reversible. Several automated cognitive assessment tools for assessing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early dementia are now available. Proponents of these tests cite as benefits the tests' repeatability and robustness and the saving of clinicians' time...
October 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
Julia Granerod, Nicholas W S Davies, Parashar P Ramanuj, Ava Easton, David W G Brown, Sara L Thomas
The true extent of sequelae in encephalitis survivors relative to rates within the general population is not known. This study aimed to quantify increased risks of epilepsy, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, cognitive problems, dementia, headache, and alcohol abuse among encephalitis cases. 2460 exposed individuals diagnosed with incident encephalitis in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and 47,914 unexposed individuals without a history of encephalitis were included...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurology
Miriam Ethel Bentwich, Nomy Dickman, Amitai Oberman
OBJECTIVES: To explore whether gaps exist between caretakers from different ethno-cultural groups (Israeli-born Jews [Sabras], Israeli Arabs [Arabs], and migrants from Russia [Russians]) regarding their perceptions of autonomy and human dignity of patients with dementia. DESIGN: A mixed-methods research scheme was used, comprised of qualitative and quantitative methods, utilizing semi-structured interviews and self-reported questionnaires. Twenty formal caretakers participated in the qualitative portion, and approximately 200 caretakers were included in the quantitative portion...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Nicolina E Savvaidou, Lazaros C Triarhou
Professor Emil Redlich (1866-1930) of the University of Vienna was born 150 years ago. Raised in a humble environment, he became an eminent researcher and neurology scholar, and succeeded in laying some of the key foundations of neuroanatomy and neuropathology. His name is linked to medical eponyms that define the dorsal root entry zone into the spinal cord, epidemic disseminated encephalomyelitis, narcolepsy, senile plaques and dementia. As its first director, he managed to organize the Maria-Theresien-Schlössel into a first-class neuropsychiatric hospital...
October 21, 2016: European Neurology
K Rygiel
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, in which an accumulation of toxic amyloid beta in the brain precedes the emergence of clinical symptoms. AD spectrum consists of presymptomatic, early symptomatic, and symptomatic phase of dementia. At present, no pharmacotherapy exists to modify or reverse a course of AD, and only symptomatic treatments are available. Many elderly patients, diagnosed with multiple medical conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cerebrovascular diseases) are at increased risk of the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and vascular dementia...
October 2016: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"