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Translational immunology

Troels Holz Borch, Lotte Engell-Noerregaard, Trine Zeeberg Iversen, Eva Ellebaek, Özcan Met, Morten Hansen, Mads Hald Andersen, Per Thor Straten, Inge Marie Svane
INTRODUCTION: Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) has generally not fulfilled its promise in cancer immunotherapy due to ineffective translation of immune responses into clinical responses. A proposed reason for this is intrinsic immune regulatory mechanisms, such as regulatory T cells (Tregs). A metronomic regimen of cyclophosphamide (mCy) has been shown to selectively deplete Tregs. To test this in a clinical setting, we conducted a phase I trial to evaluate the feasibility and safety of vaccination with DCs transfected with mRNA in combination with mCy in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma (MM)...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Simone Gross, Andrea Fischer, Marco Rosati, Lara Matiasek, Daniele Corlazzoli, Rodolfo Cappello, Laura Porcarelli, Tom Harcourt-Brown, Konrad Jurina, Laurent Garosi, Thomas Flegel, Pia Quitt, Jessica Molin, Velia-Isabel Huelsmeyer, Henning Schenk, Gualtiero Gandini, Kirsten Gnirs, Stéphane Blot, Aurélien Jeandel, Massimo Baroni, Shenja Loderstedt, Gianluca Abbiati, Carola Leithaeuser, Sabine Schulze, Marion Kornberg, Mark Lowrie, Kaspar Matiasek
Recent views on Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) question the accuracy of classification into axonal and demyelinating subtypes that represent convergent neurophysiological phenotypes rather than immunological targets. Instead it has been proposed to clarify the primarily affected fibre subunit in nerve biopsies. As nerve biopsies rarely are part of routine work-up in human patients we evaluated tissues taken from companion animals affected by GBS-like polyradiculoneuropathy to screen for distribution of immune cells, targeted fibre components and segregating non-inflammatory lesions...
September 1, 2016: Neuromuscular Disorders: NMD
Bertram Bengsch, Kyong-Mi Chang
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health challenge. HBV can cause significant morbidity and mortality by establishing acute and chronic hepatitis. Approximately 250 million people worldwide are chronically infected, and more than 2 billion people have been exposed to HBV. Since the discovery of HBV, the advances in our understanding of HBV virology and immunology have translated into effective vaccines and therapies for HBV infection. Although current therapies successfully suppress viral replication but rarely succeed in viral eradication, recent discoveries in HBV virology and immunology provide exciting rationales for novel treatment strategies aiming at HBV cure...
November 2016: Clinics in Liver Disease
Rahul Krishnan, David Ko, Clarence E Foster, Wendy Liu, A M Smink, Bart de Haan, Paul De Vos, Jonathan R T Lakey
Transplantation of alginate-encapsulated islets has the potential to treat patients suffering from type I diabetes, a condition characterized by an autoimmune attack against insulin-secreting beta cells. However, there are multiple immunological challenges associated with this procedure, all of which must be adequately addressed prior to translation from trials in small animal and nonhuman primate models to human clinical trials. Principal threats to graft viability include immune-mediated destruction triggered by immunogenic alginate impurities, unfavorable polymer composition and surface characteristics, and release of membrane-permeable antigens, as well as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) by the encapsulated islets themselves...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Robert Rosenblatt, Markus Johansson, Farhood Alamdari, Alexander Sidiki, Benny Holmström, Johan Hansson, Janos Vasko, Per Marits, Susanne Gabrielsson, Katrine Riklund, Ola Winqvist, Amir Sherif
PURPOSE: To determine whether sentinel node detection (SNd) in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer (MIBC) can be performed in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and determine whether SNd is feasible in all pT stages, including pT0. BACKGROUND: Previous published series of SNd in MIBC have not included patients undergoing NAC, and systematic reports of pT0 patients w/wo NAC were absent. Translational immunological tumor research on MIBC focusing on SNd, in the era of NAC, requires technical feasibility...
October 13, 2016: World Journal of Urology
Nicholas J Maness
Decades of research, including the 1996 Nobel Prize in Medicine, confirm the evolutionary and immunological importance of CD8 T lymphocytes (TCD8+) that target peptides bound by the highly variable major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins. However, their perceived importance has varied dramatically over the past decade. Regardless, there remains myriad reasons to consider the diversity of MHC-I alleles and the TCD8+ that target them as enormously important in infectious disease research. Thus, understanding these molecules in the best animal models of human disease could be a necessity for optimizing the translational potential of these models...
October 11, 2016: Toxicologic Pathology
Arno F Alpi, Viduth Chaugule, Helen Walden
Ubiquitin signalling is a fundamental eukaryotic regulatory system, controlling diverse cellular functions. A cascade of E1, E2, and E3 enzymes is required for assembly of distinct signals, whereas an array of deubiquitinases and ubiquitin-binding modules edit, remove, and translate the signals. In the centre of this cascade sits the E2-conjugating enzyme, relaying activated ubiquitin from the E1 activating enzyme to the substrate, usually via an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Many disease states are associated with dysfunction of ubiquitin signalling, with the E3s being a particular focus...
October 15, 2016: Biochemical Journal
Chia-Chun Tseng, Shun-Jen Chang, Wen-Chan Tsai, Tsan-Teng Ou, Cheng-Chin Wu, Wan-Yu Sung, Ming-Chia Hsieh, Jeng-Hsien Yen
OBJECTIVE: Past studies have shown common pathologic characteristics and shared immunologic features between polymyositis (PM) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To explore the potential relationship between the two diseases, we performed a nationwide cohort study. METHODS: We identified all newly diagnosed PM from Taiwan's Registry of Catastrophic Illness Database between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2011. Each PM patient was matched to at most 5 control patients from the National Health Insurance Research Database by sex, age, and entry date...
October 9, 2016: Arthritis Care & Research
Rita Diehl, Fabienne Ferrara, Claudia Müller, Antje Y Dreyer, Damian D McLeod, Stephan Fricke, Johannes Boltze
Almost every experimental treatment strategy using non-autologous cell, tissue or organ transplantation is tested in small and large animal models before clinical translation. Because these strategies require immunosuppression in most cases, immunosuppressive protocols are a key element in transplantation experiments. However, standard immunosuppressive protocols are often applied without detailed knowledge regarding their efficacy within the particular experimental setting and in the chosen model species. Optimization of such protocols is pertinent to the translation of experimental results to human patients and thus warrants further investigation...
October 10, 2016: Cellular & Molecular Immunology
Jennifer A Muszynski, Philip C Spinella, Jill M Cholette, Jason P Acker, Mark W Hall, Nicole P Juffermans, Daniel P Kelly, Neil Blumberg, Kathleen Nicol, Jennifer Liedel, Allan Doctor, Kenneth E Remy, Marisa Tucci, Jacques Lacroix, Philip J Norris
Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is difficult to define and likely represents a complicated set of physiologic responses to transfusion, including both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Similarly, the immunologic response to critical illness in both adults and children is highly complex and is characterized by both acute inflammation and acquired immune suppression. How transfusion may contribute to or perpetuate these phenotypes in the ICU is poorly understood, despite the fact that transfusion is common in critically ill patients...
October 2, 2016: Transfusion
F M Carlier, Y Sibille, C Pilette
Airway and intestinal epithelial layers represent first-line physical barriers, playing a key role in mucosal immunity. Barrier dysfunction, characterized by alterations such as disruption of cell-cell apical junctions and aberrant epithelial responses, probably constitutes early and key events for chronic immune responses to environmental antigens in the skin and in the gut. For instance, barrier dysfunction drives Th2 responses in atopic disorders or eosinophilic esophagitis. Such epithelial impairment is also a salient feature of allergic asthma and growing evidence indicates that barrier alterations probably play a driving role in this disease...
September 29, 2016: Clinical and Experimental Allergy: Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Helena Sá, Rita Leal, Manuel Santos Rosa
To deride the hope of progress is the ultimate fatuity, the last word in poverty of spirit and meanness of mind. There is no need to be dismayed by the fact that we cannot yet envisage a definitive solution of our problems, a resting-place beyond which we need not try to go. -P.B. Medawar, 1969* [Formula: see text] Thomas E. Starlz, also known as the Father of Clinical Transplantation, once said that organ transplantation was the supreme exception to the rule that most major advances in medicine spring from discoveries in basic science [Starzl T...
September 28, 2016: International Reviews of Immunology
Alberto Baroja-Mazo, Beatriz Revilla-Nuin, Pascual Parrilla, Laura Martínez-Alarcón, Pablo Ramírez, José Antonio Pons
Transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage organ failure, and modern immunosuppression has allowed important progress in short-term outcomes. However, immunosuppression poorly influences chronic rejection and elicits chronic toxicity in current clinical practice. Thus, a major goal in transplantation is to understand and induce tolerance. It is well established that human regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play important roles in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis...
September 14, 2016: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
Elsie Jacobson, Jo K Perry, David S Long, Mark H Vickers, Justin M O'Sullivan
Immune cells react to a wide range of environments, both chemical and physical. While the former has been extensively studied, there is growing evidence that physical and in particular mechanical forces also affect immune cell behavior and development. In order to elicit a response that affects immune cell behavior or development, environmental signals must often reach the nucleus. Chemical and mechanical signals can initiate signal transduction pathways, but mechanical forces may also have a more direct route to the nucleus, altering nuclear shape via mechanotransduction...
September 27, 2016: Nucleus
Andrew Leber, Raquel Hontecillas, Nuria Tubau-Juni, Josep Bassaganya-Riera
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To highlight recent advances in the understanding of nutritional immunology and in the development of novel therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). RECENT FINDINGS: We highlight the variety of factors that contribute to the interaction of the immune system and nutrition including the microbiome and the nervous system stimulation of the gut. We describe the potential for therapeutic development in IBD. Further, we review the cellular metabolic effects on immune activation and promising therapeutic targets...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology
Gizem Bener, Alex J Félix, Cristina Sánchez de Diego, Isabel Pascual Fabregat, Carlos J Ciudad, Véronique Noé
BACKGROUND: In the context of tumor immunology, tumor cells have been shown to overexpress CD47, an anti-phagocytic signal directed to macrophages to escape from phagocytosis by interacting with Signal Regulatory Protein α SIRPα. In the present work, we designed Polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins, PPRHs, to silence the expression of CD47 in tumor cells and SIRPα in macrophages with the aim to eliminate tumor cells by macrophages in co-culture experiments. METHODS: THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages with PMA...
September 26, 2016: BMC Immunology
May Griffith, Mohammad M Islam, Joel Edin, Georgia Papapavlou, Oleksiy Buznyk, Hirak K Patra
Biomaterials are now being used or evaluated clinically as implants to supplement the severe shortage of available human donor organs. To date, however, such implants have mainly been developed as scaffolds to promote the regeneration of failing organs due to old age or congenital malformations. In the real world, however, infection or immunological issues often compromise patients. For example, bacterial and viral infections can result in uncontrolled immunopathological damage and lead to organ failure. Hence, there is a need for biomaterials and implants that not only promote regeneration but also address issues that are specific to compromised patients, such as infection and inflammation...
2016: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Joan Bestard-Escalas, Jone Garate, Albert Maimó-Barceló, Roberto Fernández, Daniel Horacio Lopez, Sergio Lage, Rebeca Reigada, Sam Khorrami, Daniel Ginard, José Reyes, Isabel Amengual, José A Fernández, Gwendolyn Barceló-Coblijn
Membrane lipids are gaining increasing attention in the clinical biomarker field, as they are associated with different pathologic processes such as cancer or neurodegenerative diseases. Analyzing human colonoscopic sections by matrix assisted laser/desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging techniques, we identified a defined number of lipid species changing concomitant to the colonocyte differentiation and according to a quite simple mathematical expression. These species felt into two lipid families tightly associated in signaling: phosphatidylinositols and arachidonic acid-containing lipids...
September 20, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Peiling Tsou, Hiroyuki Katayama, Edwin J Ostrin, Samir M Hanash
There is increasing evidence supporting a role for B cells in tumor immunology. Paraneoplastic syndromes occurring before a cancer diagnosis have pointed to the potential for harnessing the humoral immune response for early cancer detection. The presence of tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes has been linked to a favorable clinical outcome in many types of cancers. However, B cells represent a heterogeneous population with functionally distinct subsets, and the balance among subtypes impacts tumor development...
October 1, 2016: Cancer Research
Pedram Hamrah, Yashar Seyed-Razavi, Takefumi Yamaguchi
Corneal immunoimaging and neuroimaging approaches facilitate in vivo analyses of the cornea, including high-resolution imaging of corneal immune cells and nerves. This approach facilitates the analyses of underlying immune and nerve alterations not detected by clinical slit-lamp examination alone. In this review, we describe recent work performed in our translational ocular immunology center with a focus on "bench-to-bedside" and "bedside-to-bench" research. The ability to visualize dendritiform immune cells (DCs) in patients with laser in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM), recently discovered in the central murine cornea, has allowed us to demonstrate their utility as a potential surrogate biomarker for inflammatory ocular surface diseases...
November 2016: Cornea
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