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Cardiovascular risk reduction

Cunlin Wang, Robert Kane, Mark Levenson, Jeffrey Kelman, Michael Wernecke, Joo-Yeon Lee, Steven Kozlowski, Carmen Dekmezian, Zhiwei Zhang, Aliza Thompson, Kimberly Smith, Yu-Te Wu, Yuqin Wei, Yoganand Chillarige, Qin Ryan, Chris Worrall, Thomas E MaCurdy, David J Graham
Importance: In 2011, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) changed its reimbursement policy for hemodialysis to a bundled comprehensive payment system that included the cost of erythrocyte-stimulating agents (ESAs). Also in 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration revised the drug label for ESAs, recommending more conservative dosing in patients with chronic kidney disease. In response to concerns that these measures could have adverse effects on patient care and outcomes, the CMS and the FDA initiated a collaboration to assess the effect...
October 24, 2016: JAMA Internal Medicine
Thaís da Silva Ferreira, Priscila Mansur Leal, Vanessa Parada Antunes, Antonio Felipe Sanjuliani, Márcia Regina Simas Torres Klein
Recent studies suggest that supplemental Ca (SC) increases the risk of cardiovascular events, whereas dietary Ca (DC) decreases the risk of cardiovascular events. Although frequently consumed with meals, it remains unclear whether Ca can mitigate or aggravate the deleterious effects of a high-fat meal on cardiovascular risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of SC or DC on blood pressure (BP) and microvascular function (MVF) in the postprandial period in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal...
October 24, 2016: British Journal of Nutrition
Guido Grassi, Fosca Quarti-Trevano, Anna Casati, Raffaella Dell'Oro
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Detection of elevated blood pressure values in elderly patients represents a common clinical condition associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. This has been shown to be the case in both systodiastolic and isolated systolic hypertension as well. However, despite the evidence of the benefits of the blood pressure lowering intervention in terms of reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, at least two issues related to antihypertensive drug treatment in aged individuals are still undefined: (1) the blood pressure threshold at which antihypertensive drug should be initiated and (2) the blood pressure goals of the therapeutic intervention...
December 2016: Current Atherosclerosis Reports
Kim Fasula, Carla A Evans, Linda Boyd, Lori Giblin, Benjamin Z Belavsky, Scott Hetzel, Patrick McBride, David L DeMets, Charles H Hennekens
BACKGROUND: Randomized data are sparse about whether a plaque identifying toothpaste reduces dental plaque and nonexistent for inflammation. Inflammation is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is accurately measured by high sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP), a sensitive marker for cardiovascular disease. The hypotheses that Plaque HD™ (TJA Health LLC, Joliet IL), a plaque identifying toothpaste, produces statistically significant reductions in dental plaque and hs-CRP were tested in this randomized trial...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Medicine
Stéphane Verguet, Solomon Tessema Memirie, Ole Frithjof Norheim
BACKGROUND: Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. METHODS: We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i...
October 21, 2016: BMC Medicine
Fernando J Martinez, Jørgen Vestbo, Julie A Anderson, Robert D Brook, Bartolome R Celli, Nicholas J Cowans, Courtney Crim, Mark Dransfield, Sally Kilbride, Julie Yates, David E Newby, Dennis Niewoehner, Peter Ma Calverley
BACKGROUND: Inhaled corticosteroids have been shown to decrease exacerbations in COPD patients with moderate to severe COPD. Their effect in patients with milder airflow obstruction remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: This was an analysis of exacerbations in the Study to Understand Mortality and MorbidITy (SUMMIT) study. DESIGN: In a double-blind randomized controlled trial, once daily inhaled placebo, fluticasone furoate (FF, 100 μg), vilanterol (VI, 25 μg) or the combination (FF/VI) was administered...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
José L de Brito Alves, Vanessa P de Sousa, Marinaldo P Cavalcanti Neto, Marciane Magnani, Valdir de Andrade Braga, João H da Costa-Silva, Carol G Leandro, Hubert Vidal, Luciano Pirola
Arterial hypertension (AH) is one of the most prevalent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CD) and is the main cause of deaths worldwide. Current research establish that dietary polyphenols may help to lower blood pressure (BP), thus contributing to the reduction of cardiovascular complications. In addition, the health benefits of probiotics on BP have also attracted increased attention, as probiotics administration modulates the microbiota, which, by interacting with ingested polyphenols, controls their bioavalability...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Mariya Markova, Olga Pivovarova, Silke Hornemann, Stephanie Sucher, Turid Frahnow, Katrin Wegner, Jürgen Machann, Klaus Jürgen Petzke, Johannes Hierholzer, Ralf Lichtinghagen, Christian Herder, Maren Carstensen-Kirberg, Michael Roden, Natalia Rudovich, Susanne Klaus, Ralph Thomann, Rosemarie Schneeweiss, Sascha Rohn, Andreas F H Pfeiffer
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with increased risk of hepatic, cardiovascular, and metabolic diseases. High-protein diets, rich in methionine and branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), apparently reduce liver fat but may induce insulin resistance. We investigated the effects of diets high in animal protein vs plant protein, which differ in levels of methionine and BCAA, in subjects with type 2 diabetes and NAFLD. We examined levels of liver fat, lipogenic indices, markers of inflammation, serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), and activation of signaling pathways in adipose tissue...
October 17, 2016: Gastroenterology
Wan-Chun Lu, Nian-Sheng Tzeng, Yu-Chen Kao, Chin-Bin Yeh, Terry B J Kuo, Chuan-Chia Chang, Hsin-An Chang
BACKGROUND: Reduced health-related quality of life in the physical domain (HRQOLphysical) has been reported to increase risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still unclear. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) that connects the body and mind is a biologically plausible candidate to investigate this mechanism. The aim of our study is to examine whether the HRQOLphysical independently contributes to heart rate variability (HRV), which reflects ANS activity...
October 21, 2016: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
M J Lin, F Baky, B C Housley, N Kelly, E Pletcher, J D Balshi, S P Stawicki, D C Evans
INTRODUCTION: Clinical information continues to be limited regarding changes in the temporal risk profile for readmissions during the initial postoperative year in vascular surgery patients. We set out to describe the associations between demographics, clinical outcomes, comorbidity indices, and hospital readmissions in a sample of patients undergoing common extremity revascularization or dialysis access (ERDA) procedures. We hypothesized that factors independently associated with readmission will evolve from "short-term" to "long-term" determinants at 30-, 180-, and 360-day postoperative cutoff points...
October 2016: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
M A Hussain, M Al-Omran, M Mamdani
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Journal of Vascular Surgery
Andrew J Beamish, Torsten Olbers, Aaron S Kelly, Thomas H Inge
Obesity is a major global health problem, and its multisystem effects are inextricably linked with elevated cardiovascular risk and adverse outcomes. The cardiovascular benefits of reversing obesity in adults are well-established. Compared with other weight-loss strategies, programmes that incorporate bariatric surgery for weight loss are beneficial for sustained BMI reduction. A marked improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been observed after bariatric surgery...
October 20, 2016: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
Hui-Jie Zhang, Ling-Ling Pan, Zhi-Min Ma, Zheng Chen, Zhu-Feng Huang, Qian Sun, Yan Lu, Cheng-Kun Han, Ming-Zhu Lin, Xue-Jun Li, Shu-Yu Yang, Xiao-Ying Li
Exercise training can reduce hepatic fat accumulation and cardiovascular risk among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but how long these benefits extend beyond the period of active intervention is unclear. Intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and metabolic risk factors were assessed among 220 obese subjects with NAFLD who were randomly assigned to vigorous-moderate exercise, moderate exercise, or control over the subsequent 1 year after 12-month exercise intervention...
October 19, 2016: Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism
N C Harvey, E Biver, J-M Kaufman, J Bauer, J Branco, M L Brandi, O Bruyère, V Coxam, A Cruz-Jentoft, E Czerwinski, H Dimai, P Fardellone, F Landi, J-Y Reginster, B Dawson-Hughes, J A Kanis, R Rizzoli, C Cooper
The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing...
October 20, 2016: Osteoporosis International
Rajkumar Bharatia, Manoj Chitale, Ganesh Narain Saxena, Raman Ganesh Kumar, Chikkalingaiah, Abhijit Trailokya, Kalpesh Dalvi, Suhas Talele
INTRODUCTION: Hypertension (HTN), being a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), is an important issue of medical and public health. High blood pressure (BP) is ranked as the third most important risk factor for attributable burden of disease in south Asia (2010). Hypertension (HTN) exerts a substantial public health burden on cardiovascular health status and healthcare systems in India. Uncontrolled hypertension among adults with hypertension is associated with increased mortality...
July 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Kunal K Sindhu
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the progressive reduction of glomerular filtration rate and subsequent retention of organic waste compounds called uremic toxins. While patients with CKD are at a higher risk of premature death due to cardiovascular complications, this increased risk cannot be completely explained by classical cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Instead, recent research suggests that uremic toxins may play a key role in explaining this marked increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD...
October 19, 2016: Renal Failure
Petra Rust, Cem Ekmekcioglu
Excessive dietary salt (sodium chloride) intake is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, which in turn is especially a major risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular pathologies, but also kidney diseases. Besides, high salt intake or preference for salty food is discussed to be positive associated with stomach cancer, and according to recent studies probably also obesity risk. On the other hand a reduction of dietary salt intake leads to a considerable reduction in blood pressure, especially in hypertensive patients but to a lesser extent also in normotensives as several meta-analyses of interventional studies have shown...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Massimiliano Ruscica, Chiara Pavanello, Sara Gandini, Monica Gomaraschi, Cecilia Vitali, Chiara Macchi, Beatrice Morlotti, Gilda Aiello, Raffaella Bosisio, Laura Calabresi, Anna Arnoldi, Cesare R Sirtori, Paolo Magni
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are currently the commonest cause of death worldwide. Different strategies for their primary prevention have been planned, taking into account the main known risk factors, which include an atherogenic lipid profile and visceral fat excess. METHODS: The study was designed as a randomized, parallel, single-center study with a nutritional intervention duration of 12 weeks. Whole soy foods corresponding to 30 g/day soy protein were given in substitution of animal foods containing the same protein amount...
October 18, 2016: European Journal of Nutrition
T Thomsen, M Aadahl, N Beyer, M L Hetland, K Løppenthin, J Midtgaard, R Christensen, B A Esbensen
BACKGROUND: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) spend a high proportion of their waking time in sedentary behaviour (SB) and have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Reduction of SB and increase in light intensity physical activity has been suggested as a means of improvement of health in patients with mobility problems. Short-term intervention studies have demonstrated that SB can be reduced by behavioural interventions in sedentary populations. To evaluate descriptively the feasibility of recruitment, randomisation, outcome assessments, retention and the acceptability of an individually tailored, theory-based behavioural intervention targeting reduction in daily sitting time in patients with RA...
October 18, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Nicola Maurea, Carmela Coppola, Giovanna Piscopo, Francesca Galletta, Gennaro Riccio, Emanuela Esposito, Claudia De Lorenzo, Michelino De Laurentiis, Paolo Spallarossa, Giuseppe Mercuro
The progress in cancer therapy and the increase in number of long-term survivors reveal the issue of cardiovascular side-effects of anticancer drugs. Cardiotoxicity has become a significant problem, and the risks of adverse cardiac events induced by systemic drugs need to be seriously considered. Potential cardiovascular toxicities linked to anticancer agents include arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension, thromboembolism, left ventricular dysfunction, and heart failure. It has been shown that several anticancer drugs seriously affect the cardiovascular system, such as ErbB2 inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, multitargeted kinase inhibitors, Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog inhibitors, and others...
May 2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine
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