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Michelle Brear
In community-based participatory research (CBPR), community-level consent is assumed to enhance ethical rigor, when obtained prior to individual informed consent. However, community leaders' permission to conduct research may influence individuals' agency to decline participation. This article presents findings of a Bourdieusian analysis of ethnographic data documenting CBPR in rural Swaziland. The findings reveal that the "symbolic power" of leaders who provide community-level consent constrains individual agency and reproduces existing relations of power, if individual informed consent is simply a procedure...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE
Ryan J Petteway, Payam Sheikhattari, Fernando Wagner
The growing prominence of community-based participatory research (CBPR) presents as an opportunity to improve tobacco-related intervention efforts. CBPR collaborations for tobacco/health, however, typically engage only adults, thus affording only a partial understanding of community context as related to tobacco. This is problematic given evidence around age of tobacco use initiation and the influence of local tobacco environments on youth. The CEASE and Resist youth photovoice project was developed as part of the Communities Engaged and Advocating for a Smoke-free Environment (CEASE) CBPR collaboration in Southwest Baltimore...
March 1, 2018: Health Promotion Practice
Linda K Ko, Eileen Rillamas-Sun, Sonia Bishop, Oralia Cisneros, Sarah Holte, Beti Thompson
BACKGROUND: Hispanic children are disproportionally overweight and obese compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts in the US. Community-wide, multi-level interventions have been successful to promote healthier nutrition, increased physical activity (PA), and weight loss. Using community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages community members in rural Hispanic communities is a promising way to promote behavior change, and ultimately weight loss among Hispanic children...
February 28, 2018: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Grace Kyoon-Achan, Josée Lavoie, Kathi Avery Kinew, Wanda Phillips-Beck, Naser Ibrahim, Stephanie Sinclair, Alan Katz
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provides the opportunity to engage communities for sustainable change. We share a journey to transformation in our work with eight Manitoba First Nations seeking to improve the health of their communities and discuss lessons learned. The study used community-based participatory research approach for the conceptualization of the study, data collection, analysis, and knowledge translation. It was accomplished through a variety of methods, including qualitative interviews, administrative health data analyses, surveys, and case studies...
February 1, 2018: Qualitative Health Research
Thomas M Ludden, Yhenneko J Taylor, Laura K Simmons, Heather A Smith, Brisa Urquieta de Hernandez, Hazel Tapp, Owen J Furuseth, Michael F Dulin
Hispanic immigrant communities across the U.S. experience persistent health disparities and barriers to primary care. We examined whether community-based participatory research (CBPR) and geospatial modeling could systematically and reproducibly pinpoint neighborhoods in Charlotte, North Carolina with large proportions of Hispanic immigrants who were at-risk for poor health outcomes and health disparities. Using a CBPR framework, we identified 21 social determinants of health measures and developed a geospatial model from a subset of those measures to identify neighborhoods with large proportions of Hispanic immigrant populations at risk for poor health outcomes...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Primary Prevention
Alison Farmer, Timothy Edgar, Jeffrey Gage, Ray Kirk
Type 2 diabetes is almost three times more prevalent in the indigenous people of New Zealand (Māori) than non-Māori. Despite the high rate of diabetes there is a low level of diabetes knowledge and awareness in the Māori community. Several studies of Māori health identify a need for new health communication approaches to diabetes prevention in order to reduce the gap between Māori and non-Māori disease rates. We applied a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) framework and behavioral theory to create a culturally appropriate documentary for Māori at risk for type 2 diabetes...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Health Communication
Laura Crane, Fern Adams, Georgia Harper, Jack Welch, Elizabeth Pellicano
There is a high incidence and prevalence of mental health problems among young people, with several barriers to help-seeking noted in this group. High rates of mental health problems have also been reported in children and adults on the autism spectrum. Taken together, young autistic people may be a particularly vulnerable group when it comes to mental health. Yet, there has been remarkably little work on the mental health needs and experiences of young autistic adults (16-25 years). Adopting a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach - in which academic researchers and young autistic adults collaborated in an equitable research partnership - we explored young autistic people's experiences of mental health problems and their perspectives on the support they sought, if any, for these problems...
February 1, 2018: Autism: the International Journal of Research and Practice
LaPrincess C Brewer, Sarah Jenkins, Kandace Lackore, Jacqueline Johnson, Clarence Jones, Lisa A Cooper, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Sharonne N Hayes, Christi Patten
BACKGROUND: Mobile health (mHealth) interventions are promising avenues to promote cardiovascular (CV) health among African-Americans (AAs) and culturally tailored technology-based interventions are emerging for this population. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to recruit AAs into a pilot intervention study of an innovative mHealth CV health promotion program and to characterize technology use patterns and eHealth literacy (EHL)...
January 31, 2018: JMIR Research Protocols
Nora Gimpel, Tiffany Kindratt, Alvin Dawson, Patti Pagels
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and service-learning are unique experiential approaches designed to train medical students how to provide individualized patient care from a population perspective. Medical schools in the US are required to provide support for service-learning and community projects. Despite this requirement, few medical schools offer structured service-learning. We developed the Community Action Research Track (CART) to integrate population medicine, health promotion/disease prevention and the social determinants of health into the medical school curriculum through CBPR and service-learning experiences...
January 26, 2018: Perspectives on Medical Education
Susan E Collins, Seema L Clifasefi, Joey Stanton, Kee J E Straits, Eleanor Gil-Kashiwabara, Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa, Andel V Nicasio, Michele P Andrasik, Starlyn M Hawes, Kimberly A Miller, Lonnie A Nelson, Victoria E Orfaly, Bonnie M Duran, Nina Wallerstein
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) answers the call for more patient-centered, community-driven research approaches to address growing health disparities. CBPR is a collaborative research approach that equitably involves community members, researchers, and other stakeholders in the research process and recognizes the unique strengths that each bring. The aim of CBPR is to combine knowledge and action to create positive and lasting social change. With its origins in psychology, sociology, and critical pedagogy, CBPR has become a common research approach in the fields of public health, medicine, and nursing...
January 22, 2018: American Psychologist
Nancy E Schoenberg, Yelena N Tarasenko, Claire Snell-Rood
Well-documented associations between lifestyle behaviors and disease outcomes necessitate evidence-based health promotion interventions. To enhance potential efficacy and effectiveness, interventionists increasingly respond to community priorities, employ comprehensive theoretical frameworks, invest heavily to ensure cultural fit, implement evidence-based programming, and deploy research gold standards. We describe a project that followed all of these recommended strategies, but did not achieve desired outcomes...
January 17, 2018: Translational Behavioral Medicine
Bhavna Shamasunder, Ashley Collier-Oxandale, Jessica Blickley, James Sadd, Marissa Chan, Sandy Navarro, Michael Hannigan, Nicole J Wong
Oilfield-adjacent communities often report symptoms such as headaches and/or asthma. Yet, little data exists on health experiences and exposures in urban environments with oil and gas development. In partnership with Promotoras de Salud (community health workers), we gathered household surveys nearby two oil production sites in Los Angeles. We tested the capacity of low-cost sensors for localized exposure estimates. Bilingual surveys of 205 randomly sampled residences were collected within two 1500 ft. buffer areas (West Adams and University Park) surrounding oil development sites...
January 15, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Janet Jull, Audrey Giles, Ian D Graham
BACKGROUND: Better use of research evidence (one form of "knowledge") in health systems requires partnerships between researchers and those who contend with the real-world needs and constraints of health systems. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and integrated knowledge translation (IKT) are research approaches that emphasize the importance of creating partnerships between researchers and the people for whom the research is ultimately meant to be of use ("knowledge users")...
December 19, 2017: Implementation Science: IS
Kristie B Hadden, Latrina Prince, Laura James, Jennifer Holland, Christopher R Trudeau
Institutions are required to ensure that persons involved in human subjects research receive appropriate human subjects protections training and education. Several organizations use the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program to fulfill training requirements. Most researchers find the CITI program too complex for community members who collaborate with researchers. This study aimed to determine the readability of CITI modules most frequently used in community-based participatory research (CBPR)...
February 2018: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE
Nusha Askari, Ann Choryan Bilbrey, Iliana Garcia Ruiz, Marika Blair Humber, Dolores Gallagher-Thompson
OBJECTIVES: To create a curriculum about Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and to train Promotoras affiliated with a local community education and health advocacy organization, in order to raise awareness and knowledge of what dementia is, and how it can be recognized, in persons of Hispanic/Latino descent. METHODS: Community based participatory research (CPBR) model was used to create materials, implement training, and engage/empower Promotoras to educate the local community...
November 21, 2017: Clinical Gerontologist
Elena Wilson, Amanda Kenny, Virginia Dickson-Swift
Ethical challenges in community-based participatory research (CBPR) are of increasing interest to researchers; however, it is not known how widespread these challenges are or how extensively the topic has been explored. Using Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review method, studies on ethical challenges in CBPR were mapped. Findings indicate that researchers continue to raise questions about ethics associated with CBPR. Our purpose in this article is to present a thematic summary of international ethical challenges as a guide for researchers interested in community participatory approaches and to better prepare them for qualitative health research with communities...
January 2018: Qualitative Health Research
Julie Lucero, Nina Wallerstein, Bonnie Duran, Margarita Alegria, Ella Greene-Moton, Barbara Israel, Sarah Kastelic, Maya Magarati, John Oetzel, Cynthia Pearson, Amy Schulz, Malia Villegas, Emily R White Hat
This article describes a mixed methods study of community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership practices and the links between these practices and changes in health status and disparities outcomes. Directed by a CBPR conceptual model and grounded in indigenous-transformative theory, our nation-wide, cross-site study showcases the value of a mixed methods approach for better understanding the complexity of CBPR partnerships across diverse community and research contexts. The article then provides examples of how an iterative, integrated approach to our mixed methods analysis yielded enriched understandings of two key constructs of the model: trust and governance...
January 2018: Journal of Mixed Methods Research
Kate E Murray, Abdimalik Buul, Rasheed Aden, Alyson M Cavanaugh, Luwam Kidane, Mikaiil Hussein, Amelia Eastman, Harvey Checkoway
Research has shown that taxi drivers are at risk for numerous health concerns, such as low back and leg pain, linked to their highly sedentary occupation, long work hours and stressors related to the job (e.g. low income, safety threats). The goal of this study was to explore occupational health risks and opportunities for health interventions with taxi drivers using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods. A mixed methods approach included first a convenience sample of 19 East African taxi drivers participating in focus group discussions...
December 2, 2017: Health Promotion International
Alice Munro, Julaine Allan, Anthony Shakeshaft, Courtney Breen
BACKGROUND: The need for effective, culturally safe residential rehabilitation services for Aboriginal people is widely acknowledged, however the combination of treatment components that is optimally effective, is not well defined. Most existing Aboriginal residential rehabilitation research has focused on describing client characteristics, and largely ignored the impact of treatment and service factors, such as the nature and quality of therapeutic components and relationships with staff...
December 6, 2017: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
Alice Munro, Anthony Shakeshaft, Anton Clifford
BACKGROUND: Given the well-established evidence of disproportionately high rates of substance-related morbidity and mortality after release from incarceration for Indigenous Australians, access to comprehensive, effective and culturally safe residential rehabilitation treatment will likely assist in reducing recidivism to both prison and substance dependence for this population. In the absence of methodologically rigorous evidence, the delivery of Indigenous drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation services vary widely, and divergent views exist regarding the appropriateness and efficacy of different potential treatment components...
December 4, 2017: Health & Justice
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