Read by QxMD icon Read


Lisa E Ishii
Facial nerve paralysis, although uncommon in the pediatric population, occurs from several causes, including congenital deformities, infection, trauma, and neoplasms. Similar to the adult population, management of facial nerve disorders in children includes treatment for eye exposure, nasal obstruction/deviation, smile asymmetry, drooling, lack of labial function, and synkinesis. Free tissue transfer dynamic restoration is the preferred method for smile restoration in this population, with outcomes exceeding those of similar procedures in adults...
November 2016: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
Fiona C Pearce, Alan A McNab, Thomas G Hardy
PURPOSE: To report 4 cases of Marcus Gunn jaw-winking synkinesis (MGJWS) in the absence of ptosis. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients with MGJWS and congenital ptosis was compiled from the public and private subspecialty adult and pediatric oculoplastic practices of the 2 senior authors (AAM, TGH). Clinical data collected on patients with MGJWS included visual acuity, stereopsis, ocular motility, side of jaw-wink, presence or absence of ptosis, levator function, clinical photographs and videos, and any management undertaken...
September 7, 2016: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Nate Jowett, Robert A Gaudin, Caroline A Banks, Tessa A Hadlock
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in long-term facial function outcomes following acute Lyme disease-associated facial palsy (LDFP) exist between patients who received antibiotic monotherapy (MT); dual therapy (DT) with antibiotics and corticosteroids; and triple therapy (TT) with antibiotics, corticosteroids, and antivirals. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. METHODS: All patients with a prior diagnosis of unilateral LDFP who presented to our center between 2002 and 2015 were retrospectively assessed for inclusion...
September 6, 2016: Laryngoscope
Alessandra Grassi Salles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Libin Xiao, Yougui Pan, Xiaolong Zhang, Yong Hu, Li Cai, Zhiyu Nie, Lizhen Pan, Bing Li, Yijing He, Lingjing Jin
Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection is one of the most widely used methods for hemifacial spasm (HFS) with high efficacy in controlling spasm. However, it is still unknown if esthetic symmetry could be desired as the spasm was controlled by BoNT-A therapy. The purpose of this study is to clarify the facial asymmetric characteristics of HFS patients and if the asymmetry could be amended by BoNT-A injection in the abnormal side. In this prospective analysis, HFS patients were enrolled, who received hemifacial BoNT-A injection and completed follow-up at weeks 2-4...
July 18, 2016: Neurological Sciences
Vishnu B Madhok, Ildiko Gagyor, Fergus Daly, Dhruvashree Somasundara, Michael Sullivan, Fiona Gammie, Frank Sullivan
BACKGROUND: Inflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action that should minimise nerve damage. This is an update of a review first published in 2002 and last updated in 2010. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroid therapy in people with Bell's palsy. SEARCH METHODS: On 4 March 2016, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Pramod Kumar Pandey, Vishaal Bhambhwani, P C Ranjith, Mandar Kadav, C Aparnaa
The authors describe a case of congenital partial pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy with absent adduction, synergistic depression of globe and widening of palpebral fissure on attempted adduction and synergistic elevation and adduction on mouth opening and sideways thrusting of jaw. The case illustrates trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis associated with congenital third nerve palsy. The possible mechanism of miswiring involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus and trigeminal nuclei is discussed. At least some cases of congenital third cranial nerve palsy may fall in the realm of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs) sharing a much wider spectrum of presentation...
May 2016: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology
Amit Kochhar, Monirah Albathi, Jeffrey D Sharon, Lisa E Ishii, Patrick Byrne, Kofi D Boahene
IMPORTANCE: The hypoglossal nerve has long been an axonal source for reinnervation of the paralyzed face. In this study, we report our experience with transposition of the intratemporal facial nerve to the hypoglossal nerve for facial reanimation. OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility and outcomes of the transposition of the infratemeporal facial nerve for end-to-side coaptation to the hypoglossal nerve for facial reanimation. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: A case series of 20 patients with facial paralysis who underwent mobilization and transposition of the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve for an end-to-side coaptation to the hypoglossal nerve (the VII to XII technique)...
September 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Kunal R Sinha, Daniel B Rootman, Babak Azizzadeh, Robert A Goldberg
IMPORTANCE: Understanding the prevalence and clinical features of eyelid malpositions in facial nerve palsy (FNP) may inform proper management of patients with FNP and supplement our knowledge of eyelid physiology. OBJECTIVE: To describe eyelid malposition in FNP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this retrospective cohort study, patients with FNP seen at the Center for Advanced Facial Plastic Surgery and Jules Stein Eye Institute between January 1, 1999, and June 1, 2014, were reviewed for study inclusion...
September 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
André M Mansoor, Peter D Sullivan
A 52-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with weakness that had progressed over a period of several weeks. Cranial-nerve examination revealed involuntary unilateral ptosis that coincided with voluntary contraction of the lower facial muscles, a form of synkinesis known as the Marin-Amat..
June 2, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
Libby J Smith, Clark A Rosen, Michael C Munin
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: As laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) becomes more refined, accurate predictions of vocal fold motion recovery are possible. Focus has been on outcomes for patients with poor prognosis for vocal fold motion recovery. Limited information is available regarding the expected rate of purposeful vocal fold motion recovery when there is good to normal motor recruitment, no signs of denervation, and no signs of synkinetic activity with LEMG, termed excellent prognosis. The objective of this study is to determine the rate of vocal fold motion recovery with excellent prognosis findings on LEMG after acute recurrent laryngeal nerve injury...
October 2016: Laryngoscope
Aboshanif Mohamed, Eigo Omi, Kohei Honda, Shinsuke Suzuki, Kazuo Ishikawa
INTRODUCTION: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. METHODS: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor...
March 31, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
James A Owusu, Leni Truong, Jennifer C Kim
IMPORTANCE: Reconstruction of the facial nerve after radical parotidectomy is commonly performed with cable grafting, which is associated with slow recovery of nerve function and synkinesis. OBJECTIVE: To describe facial nerve reconstruction after radical parotidectomy using concurrent masseteric nerve transfer and cable grafting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This retrospective medical record review at a tertiary referral hospital included 9 patients who underwent concurrent masseteric nerve transfer and cable grafting for facial nerve reconstruction performed by a single surgeon from January 1, 2014, to October 31, 2015...
September 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Koichiro Wasano, Taiji Kawasaki, Sayuri Yamamoto, Shuta Tomisato, Seiichi Shinden, Toru Ishikawa, Shujiro Minami, Takeshi Wakabayashi, Kaoru Ogawa
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between prognosis of 2 different facial palsies and pretreatment hematologic laboratory values. STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter case series with chart review. SETTING: Three tertiary care hospitals. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We examined the clinical records of 468 facial palsy patients who were treated with an antiviral drug in combination with either oral or intravenous corticosteroids in participating hospitals between 2010 and 2014...
October 2016: Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery
Silvia Mandrini, Mario Comelli, Anna Dall'angelo, Rossella Togni, Miriam Cecini, Chiara Pavese, Elena Dalla Toffola
BACKGROUND: Only few studies have considered the effects of the combined treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections and biofeedback (BFB) rehabilitation in the recovery of postparetic facial synkinesis (PPFS). AIM: To explore the presence of a persistent improvement in facial function out of the pharmacological effect of BoNT-A in subjects with established PPFS, after repeated sessions of BoNT-A injections combined with an educational facial training program using mirror biofeedback (BFB) exercises...
May 10, 2016: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Caroline A Banks, Nate Jowett, Charles R Hadlock, Tessa A Hadlock
IMPORTANCE: A universal, health care professional-graded scale for facial assessment would be a useful tool for reporting, comparing, and assessing facial function among patients with facial paralysis. OBJECTIVES: To correlate scores of an assessment tool, the eFACE scale, with expert-rated facial disfigurement and to determine the relative contributions of facial features to facial palsy-related disfigurement. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The eFACE scale yields 15 individual variable scores, in addition to subscores for static, dynamic, and synkinesis elements, and a total score that is based on 100-point scales...
July 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Robert A Gaudin, Mara Robinson, Caroline A Banks, Jennifer Baiungo, Nate Jowett, Tessa A Hadlock
IMPORTANCE: Most rehabilitation specialists and many facial reanimation surgeons use the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System (FGS) to measure and detect changes in facial function. The eFACE, an electronic and digitally graded facial measurement scale, was recently created to provide similar information to the Sunnybrook FGS, but with scaling uniformity across all categories of facial function, graphical outputs, and easy-to-use visual analog scales. OBJECTIVES: To establish the correlation between the scores on the eFACE and the Sunnybrook FGS among patients with facial paralysis and to compare the reliability of the 2 scales...
July 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Alessandra Grassi Salles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 12, 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
B Müller, G F Volk, O Guntinas-Lichius
BACKGROUND: Facial palsy and vertigo, as symptoms of vestibular schwannoma (VS) or consequences of its therapy, have a significant impact on patients' quality of life. OBJECTIVE: This review analyzed current literature on the topic and deduced recommendations for rehabilitation of facial palsy and vertigo. METHODS: The present review describes a PubMed-based search of the literature of the past 10 years. RESULTS: There is no evidence-based drug therapy for the treatment of acute facial palsy after VS surgery...
April 12, 2016: HNO
Yasmine Bennis, Véronique Duquennoy-Martinot, Pierre Guerreschi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"