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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649323/individual-based-analysis-of-hair-corticosterone-reveals-factors-influencing-chronic-stress-in-the-american-pika
#1
Matthew D Waterhouse, Bryson Sjodin, Chris Ray, Liesl Erb, Jennifer Wilkening, Michael A Russello
Glucocorticoids are often measured in wildlife to assess physiological responses to environmental or ecological stress. Hair, blood, saliva, or fecal samples are generally used depending on the timescale of the stress response being investigated and species-specific considerations. Here, we report the first use of hair samples to measure long-term corticosterone levels in the climate-sensitive American pika (Ochotona princeps). We validated an immunoassay-based measurement of corticosterone extracted from hair samples and compared corticosterone estimates obtained from plasma, hair, and fecal samples of nine pikas...
June 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28644080/determination-of-gastrointestinal-transit-times-in-barred-owls-strix-varia-by-contrast-fluoroscopy
#2
Grayson A Doss, Jackie M Williams, Christoph Mans
Contrast imaging studies are routinely performed in avian patients when an underlying abnormality of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is suspected. Fluoroscopy offers several advantages over traditional radiography and can be performed in conscious animals with minimal stress and restraint. Although birds of prey are commonly encountered as patients, little is known about GI transit times and contrast imaging studies in these species, especially owls. Owls are commonly encountered in zoological, educational, and wildlife settings...
June 2017: Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28584096/marine-reserves-can-mitigate-and-promote-adaptation-to-climate-change
#3
Callum M Roberts, Bethan C O'Leary, Douglas J McCauley, Philippe Maurice Cury, Carlos M Duarte, Jane Lubchenco, Daniel Pauly, Andrea Sáenz-Arroyo, Ussif Rashid Sumaila, Rod W Wilson, Boris Worm, Juan Carlos Castilla
Strong decreases in greenhouse gas emissions are required to meet the reduction trajectory resolved within the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, even these decreases will not avert serious stress and damage to life on Earth, and additional steps are needed to boost the resilience of ecosystems, safeguard their wildlife, and protect their capacity to supply vital goods and services. We discuss how well-managed marine reserves may help marine ecosystems and people adapt to five prominent impacts of climate change: acidification, sea-level rise, intensification of storms, shifts in species distribution, and decreased productivity and oxygen availability, as well as their cumulative effects...
June 13, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547779/the-effects-of-environmental-and-visitor-variables-on-the-behavior-of-free-ranging-ring-tailed-lemurs-lemur-catta-in-captivity
#4
Courtney Collins, Ilse Corkery, Amy Haigh, Sean McKeown, Thomas Quirke, Ruth O'Riordan
The effect of the zoo environment on captive animals is an increasingly studied area of zoo research, with visitor effects and exhibit design recognized as two of the factors that can contribute to animal welfare in captivity. It is known that in some situations, visitors may be stressful to zoo-housed primates, and this may be compounded by environmental factors such as the weather, the time of day, and zoo husbandry routines. Exhibit design and proximity of the public are also known to influence behavioral response of primates to visitors; however, there is minimal research on free-ranging zoo animals, even though they are potentially subjected to intense interactions with visitors...
May 26, 2017: Zoo Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545227/potential-use-of-chemoprotectants-against-the-toxic-effects-of-cyanotoxins-a-review
#5
REVIEW
Remedios Guzmán-Guillén, María Puerto, Daniel Gutiérrez-Praena, Ana I Prieto, Silvia Pichardo, Ángeles Jos, Alexandre Campos, Vitor Vasconcelos, Ana M Cameán
Cyanobacterial toxins, particularly microcystins (MCs) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), are responsible for toxic effects in humans and wildlife. In order to counteract or prevent their toxicity, various strategies have been followed, such as the potential application of chemoprotectants. A review of the main substances evaluated for this aim, as well as the doses and their influence on cyanotoxin-induced toxicity, has been performed. A search of the literature shows that research on MCs is much more abundant than research on CYN...
May 23, 2017: Toxins
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490331/quantifying-capture-stress-in-free-ranging-european-roe-deer-capreolus-capreolus
#6
Nikolaus Huber, Sebastian G Vetter, Alina L Evans, Petter Kjellander, Susanne Küker, Ulrika A Bergvall, Jon M Arnemo
BACKGROUND: To understand and reduce the concomitant effects of trapping and handling procedures in wildlife species, it is essential to measure their physiological impact. Here, we examined individual variation in stress levels in non-anesthetized European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), which were captured in box traps and physically restrained for tagging, biometrics and bio-sampling. In winter 2013, we collected venous blood samples from 28 individuals during 28 capture events and evaluated standard measurements for stress (heart rate, body temperature, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, lactate and total cortisol)...
May 10, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28472147/surface-reflectance-drives-nest-box-temperature-profiles-and-thermal-suitability-for-target-wildlife
#7
Stephen R Griffiths, Jessica A Rowland, Natalie J Briscoe, Pia E Lentini, Kathrine A Handasyde, Linda F Lumsden, Kylie A Robert
Thermal properties of tree hollows play a major role in survival and reproduction of hollow-dependent fauna. Artificial hollows (nest boxes) are increasingly being used to supplement the loss of natural hollows; however, the factors that drive nest box thermal profiles have received surprisingly little attention. We investigated how differences in surface reflectance influenced temperature profiles of nest boxes painted three different colors (dark-green, light-green, and white: total solar reflectance 5.9%, 64...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444848/biologically-meaningful-scents-a-framework-for-understanding-predator-prey-research-across-disciplines
#8
Michael H Parsons, Raimund Apfelbach, Peter B Banks, Elissa Z Cameron, Chris R Dickman, Anke S K Frank, Menna E Jones, Ian S McGregor, Stuart McLean, Dietland Müller-Schwarze, Elisa E Sparrow, Daniel T Blumstein
Fear of predation is a universal motivator. Because predators hunt using stealth and surprise, there is a widespread ability among prey to assess risk from chemical information - scents - in their environment. Consequently, scents often act as particularly strong modulators of memory and emotions. Recent advances in ecological research and analytical technology are leading to novel ways to use this chemical information to create effective attractants, repellents and anti-anxiolytic compounds for wildlife managers, conservation biologists and health practitioners...
April 26, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28440430/perfluorooctanoic-acid-induces-oxidative-damage-and-mitochondrial-dysfunction-in-pancreatic-%C3%AE-cells
#9
Kwang Sik Suh, Eun Mi Choi, Yu Jin Kim, Soo Min Hong, So Yong Park, Sang Youl Rhee, Seungjoon Oh, Sung Woon Kim, Youngmi Kim Pak, Wonchae Choe, Suk Chon
Several environmental contaminants have been linked to the development of diabetes and increased diabetes‑associated mortality. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widely used perfluoroalkane found in surfactants and lubricants, and in processing aids used in the production of polymers. Furthermore, PFOA has been detected in humans, wildlife and the environment. The present study investigated the toxic effects of PFOA on rat pancreatic β‑cell‑derived RIN‑m5F cells. Cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, cytokine release and mitochondrial parameters, including membrane potential collapse, reduced adenosine triphosphate levels, cardiolipin peroxidation and cytochrome c release were assessed...
June 2017: Molecular Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429851/impacts-of-taxonomic-inertia-for-the-conservation-of-african-ungulate-diversity-an-overview
#10
Spartaco Gippoliti, Fenton P D Cotterill, Dietmar Zinner, Colin P Groves
We review the state of African ungulate taxonomy over the last 120 years, with an emphasis on the introduction of the polytypic species concept and the discipline's general neglect since the middle of the 20th century. We single out negative consequences of 'orthodox' taxonomy, highlighting numerous cases of neglect of threatened lineages, unsound translocations that led to lineage introgression, and cases of maladaptation to local conditions including parasitic infections. Additionally, several captive breeding programmes have been hampered by chromosome rearrangements caused by involuntary lineage mixing...
April 21, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414723/prevalence-and-determinants-of-stereotypic-behaviours-and-physiological-stress-among-tigers-and-leopards-in-indian-zoos
#11
Janice Vaz, Edward J Narayan, R Dileep Kumar, K Thenmozhi, Krishnamoorthy Thiyagesan, Nagarajan Baskaran
India's charismatic wildlife species are facing immense pressure from anthropogenic-induced environmental perturbations. Zoos play a major role in the conservation of threatened species, but their adaptation in captivity is posing a major challenge globally. Stress from inadequate adaptation could lead to suppression of cognitive functioning and increased display of stereotypic behaviour. It is thus necessary to measure biological traits like behaviour, stress physiology, and contextual factors driving the animals maintained at zoos...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407272/the-relative-effects-of-reproductive-condition-stress-and-seasonality-on-patterns-of-parasitism-in-wild-female-black-howler-monkeys-alouatta-pigra
#12
Rodolfo Martínez-Mota, Paul A Garber, Rupert Palme, Thomas R Gillespie
Parasitic infections in wildlife are shaped by host-related traits including individual reproductive condition. It has been argued that female primates are more susceptible to infectious diseases during pregnancy due to short-term changes in immune function that result in reduced ability to combat infections. Likewise, lactation, which is the most energetically expensive state, may affect immunity and infection risk due to tradeoffs between milk production and maintenance of immune function. Here, we examine the degree to which parasite prevalence and parasite richness are affected by female reproductive condition and stress levels in wild female black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra)...
April 13, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318786/modulation-of-the-stress-response-in-wild-fish-is-associated-with-variation-in-dissolved-nitrate-and-nitrite
#13
Tom G Pottinger
Disruption of non-reproductive endocrine systems in wildlife by chemicals has received little attention but represents a potentially significant problem. Nitrate is a major anthropogenic contaminant in the freshwater aquatic environment and has been identified as a potential disrupter of endocrine function in aquatic animals. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the function of the neuroendocrine stress axis in fish and inorganic N loading along reaches of rivers receiving cumulative point source and diffuse chemical inputs...
March 15, 2017: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284611/dead-mouse-hopping-tyzzer-s-disease-in-spinifex-hopping-mice-notomys-alexis
#14
Hayley J Stannard, Melissa L Tulk, Julie M Old
Tyzzer's disease is caused by Clostridium piliformes and affects a wide range of domestic and wildlife species. Non-descript signs, if any, and a short incubation period make Tyzzer's disease difficult to diagnose and treat before death occurs. Here we describe an unexpected outbreak of Tyzzer's disease in a colony of native Australian spinifex hopping-mice (Notomys alexis). In this study captive hopping-mice were used in a nutrition trial (n=11), and others were housed in close proximity (n=4). During the nutrition trial, two hopping-mice exhibited signs of lethargy and diarrhoea, and were removed from the trial but died soon after...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277549/the-final-oral-ebola-vaccine-trial-on-captive-chimpanzees
#15
Peter D Walsh, Drishya Kurup, Dana L Hasselschwert, Christoph Wirblich, Jason E Goetzmann, Matthias J Schnell
Could new oral vaccine technologies protect endangered wildlife against a rising tide of infectious disease? We used captive chimpanzees to test oral delivery of a rabies virus (RABV) vectored vaccine against Ebola virus (EBOV), a major threat to wild chimpanzees and gorillas. EBOV GP and RABV GP-specific antibody titers increased exponentially during the trial, with rates of increase for six orally vaccinated chimpanzees very similar to four intramuscularly vaccinated controls. Chimpanzee sera also showed robust neutralizing activity against RABV and pseudo-typed EBOV...
March 9, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277184/quercetin-attenuates-domoic-acid-induced-cognitive-deficits-in-mice
#16
Dongmei Wang, Jianlong Zhao, Sanqiang Li, Guomin Shen, Shu Hu
Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved in DA-induced cognitive functional impairment. Therefore, therapeutics targeted to improve mitochondrial function and increase oxidative stress defence could be beneficial...
September 26, 2016: Nutritional Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213652/evaluating-stress-physiology-and-parasite-infection-parameters-in-the-translocation-of-critically-endangered-woylies-bettongia-penicillata
#17
Stephanie Hing, Amy S Northover, Edward J Narayan, Adrian F Wayne, Krista L Jones, Sarah Keatley, R C Andrew Thompson, Stephanie S Godfrey
Translocation can be stressful for wildlife. Stress may be important in fauna translocation because it has been suggested that it can exacerbate the impact of infectious disease on translocated wildlife. However, few studies explore this hypothesis by measuring stress physiology and infection indices in parallel during wildlife translocations. We analysed faecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) concentration and endoparasite parameters (nematodes, coccidians and haemoparasites) in a critically endangered marsupial, the woylie (Bettongia penicillata), 1-3 months prior to translocation, at translocation, and 6 months later...
February 17, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28186107/blubber-transcriptome-response-to-acute-stress-axis-activation-involves-transient-changes-in-adipogenesis-and-lipolysis-in-a-fasting-adapted-marine-mammal
#18
J I Khudyakov, C D Champagne, L M Meneghetti, D E Crocker
Stress can compromise an animal's ability to conserve metabolic stores and participate in energy-demanding activities that are critical for fitness. Understanding how wild animals, especially those already experiencing physiological extremes (e.g. fasting), regulate stress responses is critical for evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on physiology and fitness, key challenges for conservation. However, studies of stress in wildlife are often limited to baseline endocrine measurements and few have investigated stress effects in fasting-adapted species...
February 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166271/transcriptional-deregulation-of-genetic-biomarkers-in-chironomus-riparius-larvae-exposed-to-ecologically-relevant-concentrations-of-di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate-dehp
#19
Óscar Herrero, Gloria Morcillo, Rosario Planelló
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant used worldwide as a plasticizer and solvent in many formulations. Based on available toxicological data, it has been classified as toxic for reproduction and as an endocrine disruptor. Despite this, ecotoxicological studies in aquatic wildlife organisms are still scarce. In the present work, the toxic molecular alterations caused by DEHP in aquatic larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius have been studied, by analyzing the transcriptional activity of genes related to some vital cellular pathways, such as the ribosomal machinery (rpL4, rpL13), the cell stress response (hsc70, hsp70, hsp40, hsp27), the ecdysone hormone pathway (EcR), the energy metabolism (GAPDH), and detoxication processes (CYP4G)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28163324/primate-reinfection-with-gastrointestinal-parasites-behavioural-and-physiological-predictors-of-parasite-acquisition
#20
Sagan Friant, Toni E Ziegler, Tony L Goldberg
Infectious disease transmission is a cost of sociality in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms linking social behaviour to infection risk are poorly known. We conducted a field experiment to examine how host intrinsic traits, behaviour and physiology affect infection of nonhuman primates with gastrointestinal parasites. We measured rate to reinfection in a social group of red-capped mangabeys, Cercocebus torquatus, following chemotherapeutic treatment for parasite infections. By measuring behaviour, infection and glucocorticoid levels, we compared the relative effects of space sharing, directional contact and physiological stress on risk of acquiring new infections...
July 2016: Animal Behaviour
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