Read by QxMD icon Read

BPH medication

Phillip Ertel, Burkay Adalig, Ipek Demircan, Belinda Lartey, Michael J Manyak
AIM: To assess attitudes and beliefs towards benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)/ lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and its treatment among patients and physicians in Latin America, Asia Pacific and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). METHODS: Cross-sectional, quantitative study conducted between December 2014 and September 2015. Separate questionnaires were administered to BPH/LUTS patients receiving drug treatment for their condition and to practising physicians who treat patients with BPH/LUTS...
October 2016: International Journal of Clinical Practice
David Altschul, Andrew Kobets, Jonathan Nakhla, Ajit Jada, Rani Nasser, Merritt D Kinon, Reza Yassari, John Houten
OBJECTIVE Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a common problem leading to morbidity and an increased hospital stay. There are limited data regarding its baseline incidence in patients undergoing spinal surgery and the risk factors with which it may be associated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of POUR in elective spine surgery patients and determine the factors associated with its occurrence. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had undergone elective spine surgery and had been prospectively monitored for POUR during an 18-month period...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine
R Thuret, S Hurel, F Kleinclauss, M O Timsit
OBJECTIVES: To describe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their management in renal transplant candidates and recipients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Relevant publications were identified through Medline ( and Embase ( database using the following keywords, alone or in association: "transplantation", "prostate hyperplasia", "transurethral resection of prostate", "urinary incontinence", "LUTS", "pelvic floor dysfunction"...
October 7, 2016: Progrès en Urologie
Philipp Dahm, Michelle Brasure, Roderick MacDonald, Carin M Olson, Victoria A Nelson, Howard A Fink, Bruce Rwabasonga, Michael C Risk, Timothy J Wilt
CONTEXT: Alpha-blockers (ABs) and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors have an established role in treating male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Recently, newer drugs have shown promise for this indication. OBJECTIVE: To assess the comparative effectiveness and adverse effects (AEs) of newer drugs to treat LUTS attributed to BPH through a systematic review and meta-analysis. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Ovid MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Ovid Embase bibliographic databases (through June 2016) were hand searches for references of relevant studies...
October 4, 2016: European Urology
Fabrizio Presicce, Cosimo De Nunzio, Mauro Gacci, Enrico Finazzi Agrò, Andrea Tubaro
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of the ultrasound assessments of the bladder/detrusor wall thickness (BWT/DWT) and the ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW) in lower urinary tract symptoms diagnosis and treatment. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A systematic literature search from January 1995 until February 2016 was performed on PubMed using the following terms: Bladder Weight, Bladder Wall Thickness, Detrusor Wall Thickness, LUTS, Bladder Outlet Obstruction (BOO), Benign Prostatic Obstruction...
October 5, 2016: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, the Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Maral DerSarkissian, Yongling Xiao, Mei Sheng Duh, Patrick Lefebvre, Andrine R Swensen, Christopher F Bell
BACKGROUND: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in men that is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms. Pharmacologic treatment with alpha blockers (ABs) and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) is recommended to alleviate symptoms, prevent disease progression that can lead to complications, and reduce health care costs. OBJECTIVE: To compare clinical, economic, and health care resource utilization outcomes among BPH patients treated with early continuous combination AB and 5ARI therapy (dutasteride vs...
October 2016: Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy
Kenneth Jackson DeLay, Max Nutt, Kevin T McVary
The link between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and sexual dysfunction is well established. Sexual dysfunction can encompass both ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Ejaculatory dysfunction can consist of premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, anejaculation, decreased force of ejaculation and pain upon ejaculation. The impact of different medical and surgical therapies on ejaculatory function will be reviewed...
August 2016: Translational Andrology and Urology
Simone Albisinni, Ibrahim Biaou, Quentin Marcelis, Fouad Aoun, Cosimo De Nunzio, Thierry Roumeguère
BACKGROUND: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in men are a common clinical problem in urology and have been historically strictly linked to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which may lead to bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). New molecules have been approved and have entered the urologists' armamentarium, targeting new signaling pathways and tackling specific aspects of LUTS. Objective of this review is to summarize the evidence regarding the new medical therapies currently available for male non-neurogenic LUTS, including superselective α1-antagonists, PDE-5 inhibitors, anticholinergic drugs and intraprostatic onabotulinum toxin injections...
September 15, 2016: BMC Urology
Hyeon Yu, Ari J Isaacson, Charles T Burke
Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is an emerging, novel interventional technique in the management of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH is a common clinical condition in middle-aged and elderly men resulting in LUTS, including nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency, decreased urinary flow rates, hesitancy, and incomplete bladder emptying. Traditionally, LUTSs have been managed by medical or surgical therapies. Since the initial incidental discovery that selective PAE performed for uncontrolled bleeding secondary to BPH resulted in improved LUTS, the technique has continually evolved with a growing body of evidence supporting its safety and efficacy...
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
Matthew Ryan Macey, Mathew C Raynor
Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is one of the most common ailments affecting aging men. Symptoms typically associated with BPH include weak stream, hesitancy, urgency, frequency, and nocturia. More serious complications of BPH include urinary retention, gross hematuria, bladder calculi, recurrent urinary tract infection, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. Evaluation of BPH includes a detailed history, objective assessment of urinary symptoms with validated questionnaires, and measurement of bladder function parameters, including uroflowmetry and postvoid residual...
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
Paweł Paśko, Tomasz Rodacki, Renata Domagała-Rodacka, Danuta Owczarek
Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common disease in elderly men. BPH symptoms include frequent urination, urgent tenesmus and urination at night, a weak and interrupted urine flow and a sense of incomplete emptying of the bladder. Alpha- 1 adrenergic receptor antagonists and 5 α-reductase inhibitors form the most important groups of medications employed in BPH. Appropriately managed BPH patients shall be subject to counselling on interactions between agents belonging to these groups, and on particular components of the food they have...
August 20, 2016: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Todd J Woodard, Kendra R Manigault, Niesha N McBurrows, Tiffany L Wray, Laresa M Woodard
Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy, is a nonmalignant adenomatous overgrowth of the periurethral prostate gland commonly seen in aging men. Historically, it has been assumed that the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract symptoms in men is the result of bladder outlet obstruction associated with prostate enlargement. Symptoms such as urinary hesitancy, incomplete bladder emptying, dribbling or prolonged urination, nocturia, urinary urgency, and/or urge incontinence are common...
2016: Consultant Pharmacist: the Journal of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists
Naoya Masumori, Taiji Tsukamoto, Akihiko Shibuya, Noriomi Miyao, Yasuharu Kunishima, Akihiko Iwasawa
PURPOSE: Our aim was to prospectively analyze the 3-year outcomes of naftopidil treatment for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including those who dropped out during follow-up and had retreatment for BPH after termination of the drug within 3 years. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Naftopidil, 50 mg/d or 75 mg/d, was given to 117 patients having BPH aged 50 years and older who had international prostate symptom scores (IPSS) ≥8. They were prospectively followed for 3 years with periodic evaluation...
2016: Patient Preference and Adherence
Ralph M Trüeb
Based on observations of Julianne Imperato-McGinley of Cornell Medical College, New York presented at a conference on birth defects in 1974 on a peculiar genetic disorder due to type 2 5α-reductase deficiency (5-ARD), oral finasteride was approved in 1992 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and in 1997 for treatment of male pattern baldness (MPB). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
August 4, 2016: Experimental Dermatology
Kathryn Brigham Egan
This article assesses the reported prevalence and incidence rates for benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) by age, symptom severity, and race/ethnicity. BPH/LUTS prevalence and incidence rates increase with increasing age and vary by symptom severity. The BPH/LUTS relationship is complex due to several factors. This contributes to the range of reported estimates and difficulties in drawing epidemiologic comparisons. Cultural, psychosocial, economic, and/or disease awareness and diagnosis factors may influence medical care access, symptom reporting and help-seeking behaviors among men with BPH/LUTS...
August 2016: Urologic Clinics of North America
Lulu K Lee, Amir Goren, Natalie N Boytsov, Craig F Donatucci, Kevin T McVary
OBJECTIVE: Erectile dysfunction (ED) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) frequently co-occur in men aged ≥40, along with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to BPH. Given little real-world evidence on treatment use or satisfaction with treatment for concurrent BPH/LUTS and/or ED, this study examined medication regimens and differences in satisfaction and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across regimens among men with concurrent BPH and ED. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using an Internet survey of participants recruited through an online panel...
2016: Patient Preference and Adherence
Kutan Ozer, Mustafa Ozan Horsanali, Sacit Nuri Gorgel, Burcu Ozalp Horsanali, Emin Ozbek
AIM: There is a large body of evidence of clinical studies regarding the relation between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men. A possible link between inflammation and these 2 clinical entities has also been proposed. Here, we aimed at evaluating the role of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), an indicator of inflammation and MetS, in the pathogenesis of LUTS and other BPH-related parameters. METHOD: We evaluated 244 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia admitted to our outpatient clinic between January 2014 and June 2015...
July 28, 2016: Urologia Internationalis
Shirin Shahbazi, Maryam Khorasani, Reza Mahdian
OBJECTIVES: The ectopic expression of coagulation Factor VII has been shown in various cancers. Recently, F7 gene has been identified as a direct target of the androgen receptor in breast cancer. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of F7 and AR in clinical sample series of prostate cancer and BPH. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All the prostate cancer patients were new cases with no medical history of surgery or chemotherapy. The tissue samples were assigned as either prostate cancer tumor (n= 45) harboring at least 80% tumor cell content, or BPH (n= 36)...
July 8, 2016: Cancer Biomarkers: Section A of Disease Markers
Yi-ping Lu, Jia-yu Liang
Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) resulting from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) obviously impair the quality of life of middle-aged and elderly men. Current management of BPH includes wait-and-watch, medical therapy, and conventional surgery. As a new approach, minimally invasive surgery has been playing an increasingly important role in the management of BPH, with potential advantages of less operative trauma, quicker recovery, lower risk of postoperative complications and higher quality of life. This review mainly discusses prostatic urethral lift (Urolift® System), transurethral water vapor therapy (Rezūm® System) and robot-guided high-energy water ablation (PROCEPT Aquablation™ System)...
May 2016: Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue, National Journal of Andrology
Denise Kreutzwiser, Alice Tseng
INTRODUCTION: Significant advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy have transformed HIV into a chronic manageable disease. Co-morbidities associated with aging, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), are becoming increasingly prevalent in the HIV-infected population. The pharmacological treatment of BPH involves medications mainly metabolized by CYP 450 enzymes, while many ARVs have inducing or inhibiting effects on the CYP 450 system. Consequently, there is potential for significant pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between these two classes of medications...
October 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"