Read by QxMD icon Read

spinal trauma imaging

Xiao Wu, Ajay Malhotra, Bertie Geng, Vivek B Kalra, Khalid Abbed, Howard P Forman, Pina Sanelli
Importance: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continues to be performed for cervical clearance of obtunded blunt trauma, despite poor evidence regarding its utility after a normal computed tomographic (CT) finding. Objective: To evaluate the utility and cost-effectiveness of MRI vs no follow-up after a normal cervical CT finding in patients with obtunded blunt trauma. Design, Setting and Participants: This cost-effectiveness analysis evaluated an average patient aged 40 years with blunt trauma from an institutional practice...
March 14, 2018: JAMA Surgery
John H Harris, William H Harris, Sanjay Jain, A Y Ferguson, David A Hill, Amy M Trahan
PURPOSE: CTA is routinely ordered on level II blunt thoraco-abdominally injured patients for assessment of injury to the thoracic aorta. The vast majority of such assessments are negative. The question being asked is, Does the accurate interpretation of the three mediastinal signs permit reliable determination of which patients need CTA for aortic assessment? The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the role of three specifically selected mediastinal anatomic signs on the initial supine chest radiograph (CXR) of adult level II blunt thoraco-abdominally injured patients for the presence or absence of a mediastinal hematoma...
March 13, 2018: Emergency Radiology
Salim Şentürk, Ahmet Öğrenci, Ahmet Gürhan Gürçay, Ahmet Atilla Abdioğlu, Onur Yaman, Ali Fahir Özer
AIM: Burst fractures can occur with different radiological images after high energy. We aimed to simplify radiological staging of burst fractures. METHODS: Eighty patients whom exposed spinal trauma and had burst fracture were evaluated concerning age, sex, fracture segment, neurological deficit, secondary organ injury and radiological changes that occurred. RESULTS: We performed a new classification in burst fractures at radiological images...
February 15, 2018: Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences
Gesa Bakker, Joerg Hattingen, Hartmut Stuetzer, Joerg Isenberg
OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of insufficiency fractures of the sacrum in an elder population increases annually. Fractures show very different morphology. We aimed to classify sacral insufficiency fractures according to the position of cortical break and possible need for intervention. METHODS: Between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014, all patients with a proven fracture of the sacrum following a low-energy or an even unnoticed trauma were prospectively registered : 117 females and 13 males...
March 2018: Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
Ajay Premkumar, William Godfrey, Michael B Gottschalk, Scott D Boden
BACKGROUND: Low back pain has a high prevalence and morbidity, and is a source of substantial health-care spending. Numerous published guidelines support the use of so-called red flag questions to screen for serious pathology in patients with low back pain. This paper examines the effectiveness of red flag questions as a screening tool for patients presenting with low back pain to a multidisciplinary academic spine center. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of the cases of 9,940 patients with a chief complaint of low back pain...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
David Z Cai, Geoffrey Liu, Christopher F Wolf, Zachary M Mansell, Jonathan P Eskander, Mark Eskander
Brown-Séquard syndrome, while uncommon, is a neurological condition that classically results from the hemisection of the spinal cord as a result of a penetrating injury to the spinal cord. We present a reported case of blunt trauma causing a high-energy cervical burst fracture/dislocation with a significant cord signal change producing Brown-Séquard syndrome. In this case, the burst fracture at the level of C5 obtained from the motor vehicle accident led to the damage of the left-sided lateral spinal thalamic tract, descending lateral cortical spinal tracts, and ascending dorsal column...
January 2018: Asian Journal of Neurosurgery
Maria Isabel Bento Ayres Pereira Harry Leite, Sérgio Azevedo Ferreira Alves, Rui Paulo Vicente Reinas, Marta Gomes Rodrigues, Ana Sofia Martins das Neves Garrido, Otília Peixoto da Cunha, Joana Sofia Oliveira Rodrigues, Maria de Fátima Oliveira Santos Poças, Mário António Leite Resende Martins
A previously healthy 13-year-old girl presented with a 9-day history of acute onset severe neck pain associated with limited range of movement. Medical evaluation at day 2 was suggestive of muscle contracture, and she was discharged home with diazepam, antiinflammatory agents, and rest; however, she returned because of progressive clinical worsening with left arm distal paresthesia and paralysis since day 3. There was no history of trauma or other systemic complaints, and her familial medical history was unremarkable...
February 28, 2018: Pediatric Emergency Care
Michael Kim, Jessa Hoffman, Anubhav Amin, Manish Purohit, Avinash Mohan
A spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a collection of blood in the spinal epidural space that occurs in the absence of trauma. They most commonly present in the fourth to fifth decade in life with acute onset neck or back pain with delayed neurologic deficit. However, this presentation is often complicated in children because of the limitations in the pediatric neurologic exam. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis. Here is a rare case of an infant spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma whose diagnosis was delayed because of a recent history of fever and viral pharyngitis before his development of neurologic deficits...
February 28, 2018: Pediatric Emergency Care
Qi-Cai Sun, Xuan-Liang Ru, Bai-Shan Song, Qun-Li Duanmu
OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively analyze the clinical data of 17 patients with bone cement leakage after percutaneous kyphoplasty and explore the leakage type and mid-term clinical effects. METHODS: The clinical data of 17 patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures occurred bone cement leakage after percutaneous kyphoplasty from October 2011 to October 2016 were collected. There were 7 males and 10 females, aged from 68 to 87 years old with an average of 78 years...
September 25, 2017: Zhongguo Gu Shang, China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Stephen J Johans, Kevin N Swong, Daniel J Burkett, Michael P Wemhoff, Sean M Lew, Chirag R Patel, Anand V Germanwala
Superficial siderosis (SS) of the CNS is a rare and often unrecognized condition. Caused by hemosiderin deposition from chronic, repetitive hemorrhage in the subarachnoid space, it results in parenchymal damage in the subpial layers of the brain and spinal cord. T2-weighted MRI shows the characteristic hypointensity of hemosiderin deposition, classically occurring around the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Patients present with progressive gait ataxia and sensorineural hearing impairment. Although there have been several studies, case reports, and review articles over the years, the clear pathophysiology of subarachnoid space hemorrhage remains to be elucidated...
February 16, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Yaniv Steinfeld, Yaniv Keren, Elias Haddad
Introduction: Central cord syndrome (CCS) is an injury to the center of the spinal cord. It is well known as a hyperextension injury, but it has never been described as a surfing injury. Our report describes this injury in detail. Case presentation: A 35-year-old male novice surfer presented to the emergency department with acute tetraplegia following falling off his surfboard and hitting sea floor at a shallow beach break. He was rescued by a fellow surfer while floating in the sea and unable to raise his head above sea level...
2018: Spinal Cord Series and Cases
Zhong-You Zeng, Wei-Feng Yan, Yong-Xing Song, Ke-Ya Mao, Jian-Fei Ji, Jian-Qiao Zhang, Peng Wu, Fei Pei, Guo-Hao Song, Jian-Fu Han, Wei Yu
OBJECTIVE: To discuss the advantages and disadvantages of two different surgical approaches combined fixation with lumbar interbody fusion in treating single segmental lumbar vertebra diseases. METHODS: The clinical data of 86 patients with single segmental lumbar vertebra diseases treated from June 2011 to June 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. There were 33 males and 53 females, aged from 28 to 76 years old with an average of 53.0 years. Among them, there were 39 cases of lumbar disc degeneration, 22 cases of lumbar disc herniation complicated with spinal canal stenosis, 9 cases of huge lumbar disc herniation and 16 cases of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (Meyerding degree I )...
May 25, 2017: Zhongguo Gu Shang, China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Toshiyuki Okazaki, Hiroshi Nakagawa, Hitoshi Hayase, Shinsuke Irie, Toru Inagaki, Osamu Saito, Motoshige Yamashina, Shinji Nagahiro, Koji Saito
Spontaneous and chronic epidural hematoma (SSEH) in the lumbar spine is rare, and idiopathic and chronic SSEH in the lumbar spine is extremely rare disease. Most of lumbar SSEH were acute and secondary with trauma, hematologic disorders, drug, and surgical procedure. Only 20 cases of chronic SSEH in the lumbar spine have been reported and 14 cases among them were considered to be idiopathic. Definitive guidelines for management of this condition are not clear and surgical total evacuation was performed in most of the cases...
February 7, 2018: Neurologia Medico-chirurgica
Tariq Wani, Ralph Beltran, Giorgio Veneziano, Faris AlGhamdi, Hatem Azzam, Nahida Akhtar, Dmitry Tumin, Yasser Majid, Joseph D Tobias
BACKGROUND: The distance from the dura to spinal cord is not uniform at different vertebral levels. The dura to spinal cord distance may be a critical factor in avoiding the potential for neurological injury caused by needle trauma after a dural puncture. Typically, the greater the dura to spinal cord distance, the larger the potential safety margin. The objective of our study is to measure dura to spinal cord distance at two thoracic levels T6 -7 , T9 -10 , and one lumbar level L1 -2 using MRI images...
February 6, 2018: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Brandon K Root, Derrek A Schartz, Dan R Calnan, William F Hickey, David F Bauer
INTRODUCTION: Spinal epidural hematomas are uncommon in children. The diagnosis can be elusive as most cases present without a history of trauma, while symptoms can be atypical. CASE REPORT: We encountered a 35-month-old male presenting with nonspecific symptoms and no history of trauma. He later developed unilateral miosis and ptosis; MRI discovered a subacute cervicothoracic epidural which was promptly evacuated. The patient made an excellent recovery. COCLUSIONS: We emphasize the frequent absence of identifiable trauma and the importance of thorough imaging when this entity is suspected...
February 2, 2018: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Naoki Notani, Masashi Miyazaki, Toyomi Yoshiiwa, Toshinobu Ishihara, Shozo Kanezaki, Hiroshi Tsumura
RATIONALE: Acute neurological deficits following spinal surgery commonly result from epidural hematoma, surgical trauma, vascular compromise, and graft or hardware impingement, with the cause identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present a rare case of dynamic paraspinal muscle impingement after C1 posterior arch laminectomy, which was diagnosed by myelography, with no significant findings on MRI. PATIENT CONCERNS: An 81-year-old, severely obese male, was referred to our department for the treatment of vertebral disease of the lumbar spine...
December 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
Emily Rider-Longmaid, Junjian Huang, Ronnie Sebro, Harvey Smith
BACKGROUND: Pseudomeningoceles most commonly occur due to prior trauma or surgery and are often located in the posterior paraspinous tissues. Here, we report a case of an intraosseous pseudomeningocele that mimicked an intra-osseous T2 hyperintense lesion in the L1 vertebral body. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 64-year-old male presented with back, left lateral thigh and left knee pain lasting several months. He had no prior history of trauma or surgery. Radiographs of the lumbar spine showed mild levoscoliotic curvature of the lumbar spine, Baastrup's changes between the spinous processes, multilevel degenerative disc disease and facet arthropathy...
January 31, 2018: European Spine Journal
Veronika Wegener, Axel Stäbler, Volkmar Jansson, Christof Birkenmaier, Bernd Wegener
Burner or stinger syndrome is a rare sports injury caused by direct or indirect trauma during high-speed or contact sports mainly in young athletes. It affects peripheral nerves, plexus trunks or spinal nerve roots, causing paralysis, paresthesia and pain. We report the case of a 57-year-old male athlete suffering from burner syndrome related to a lumbar nerve root. He presented with prolonged pain and partial paralysis of the right leg after a skewed landing during the long jump. He was initially misdiagnosed since the first magnet resonance imaging was normal whereas electromyography showed denervation...
January 2018: Korean Journal of Pain
Apeksha Chaturvedi, Abhishek Chaturvedi, A Luana Stanescu, Johan G Blickman, Steven P Meyers
Mechanical birth-related injuries to the neonate are declining in incidence with advances in prenatal diagnosis and care. These injuries, however, continue to represent an important source of morbidity and mortality in the affected patient population. In the United States, these injuries are estimated to occur among 2.6% of births. Although more usual in context of existing feto-maternal risk factors, their occurrence can be unpredictable. While often superficial and temporary, functional and cosmetic sequelae, disability or even death can result as a consequence of birth-related injuries...
January 22, 2018: Insights Into Imaging
Peter John Wilson, Michael Derrick Selby
Background: C7 has relatively unique anatomy compared to the remainder of the subaxial cervical spine (C3-C6) and upper thoracic spine. The C7 laminar has been previously reported in feasibility and biomechanical studies as an adequate fixation point in contrast to the lateral mass or pedicles, with few reports of its use in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to review the safety and efficacy of using the C7 laminar as a fixation point in constructs involving the cervical spine and cervicothoracic junction...
December 2017: Journal of Spine Surgery (Hong Kong)
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"