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myocardial infarction and heart failure

David C Classen, William Munier, Nancy Verzier, Noel Eldridge, David Hunt, Mark Metersky, Chesley Richards, Yun Wang, P Jeffrey Brady, Amy Helwig, James Battles
The explicit declaration in the landmark 1999 Institute of Medicine report "To Err Is Human" that, in the United States, 44,000 to 98,000 patients die each year as a consequence of "medical errors" gave widespread validation to the magnitude of the patient safety problem and catalyzed a number of U.S. federal government programs to measure and improve the safety of the national healthcare system. After more than 10 years, one of those federal programs, the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System (MPSMS), has reached a level of maturity and stability that has made it useful for the consistent measurement of the safety of inpatient care...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Patient Safety
Guilielmus H J M Ellenbroek, Gerardus P J van Hout, Leo Timmers, Pieter A Doevendans, Gerard Pasterkamp, Imo E Hoefer
Mortality after acute myocardial infarction remains substantial and is associated with significant morbidity, like heart failure. Novel therapeutics are therefore required to confine cardiac damage, promote survival and reduce the disease burden of heart failure. Large animal experiments are an essential part in the translational process from experimental to clinical therapies. To optimize clinical translation, robust and representative outcome measures are mandatory. The present manuscript aims to address this need by describing the assessment of three clinically relevant outcome modalities in a pig acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model: infarct size in relation to area at risk (IS/AAR) staining, 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and admittance-based pressure-volume (PV) loops...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Vikrant Rai, Poonam Sharma, Swati Agrawal, Devendra K Agrawal
Heart disease causing cardiac cell death due to ischemia-reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Coronary heart disease and cardiomyopathies are the major cause for congestive heart failure, and thrombosis of the coronary arteries is the most common cause of myocardial infarction. Cardiac injury is followed by post-injury cardiac remodeling or fibrosis. Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium and results in both systolic and diastolic dysfunctions...
October 20, 2016: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Ruijie Liu, Hadi Khalil, Suh-Chin J Lin, Michelle A Sargent, Allen J York, Jeffery D Molkentin
Nemo-like kinase (NLK) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine protein kinase implicated in development, proliferation and apoptosis regulation. Here we identified NLK as a gene product induced in the hearts of mice subjected to pressure overload or myocardial infarction injury, suggesting a potential regulatory role with pathological stimulation to this organ. To examine the potential functional consequences of increased NLK levels, cardiac-specific transgenic mice with inducible expression of this gene product were generated, as well as cardiac-specific Nlk gene-deleted mice...
2016: PloS One
Shi Jia, Xue Qiao, Jingjing Ye, Xuan Fang, Chunling Xu, Yangpo Cao, Ming Zheng
Myocardial infarction is caused by insufficient coronary blood supply, which leads to myocardial damage and eventually the heart failure. Molecular mechanisms associated with the loss of cardiomyocytes during myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-related cardiac diseases are not yet fully understood. Nogo-C is an endoplasmic reticulum protein ubiquitously expressed in tissues including in the heart, however, the cardiac function of Nogo-C is still unknown. In the present study, we found that Nogo-C was upregulated in mouse hearts after MI, and hypoxic treatments also increased Nogo-C protein level in cardiomyocytes...
October 20, 2016: Cell Death & Disease
M Namdari, A Eatemadi, B Negahdari
Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), also known as a B-type natriuretic peptide, is one of the important biomarkers with a proven role in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF). Researchers from the different clinical field have researched into the performance features of BNP testing in the acute care set-up to assist and improve in diagnosing CHF and in predicting future morbidity and mortality rates. The potency of BNP has also been researched into in cases like myocardial ischemia and infarction, cor pulmonale, and acute pulmonary embolism (PE)...
September 30, 2016: Cellular and Molecular Biology
Robert E Burke, Jeffrey L Schnipper, Mark V Williams, Edmondo J Robinson, Eduard E Vasilevskis, Sunil Kripalani, Joshua P Metlay, Grant S Fletcher, Andrew D Auerbach, Jacques D Donzé
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: New tools to accurately identify potentially preventable 30-day readmissions are needed. The HOSPITAL score has been internationally validated for medical inpatients, but its performance in select conditions targeted by the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) is unknown. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Six geographically diverse medical centers. PARTICIPANTS/EXPOSURES: All consecutive adult medical patients discharged alive in 2011 with 1 of the 4 medical conditions targeted by the HRRP (acute myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and heart failure) were included...
October 14, 2016: Medical Care
Agathe Gerwina Elena Pollmann, Marianne Frederiksen, Eva Prescott
PURPOSE: Evidence of the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart valve surgery is scarce, but nevertheless CR is recommended for this group of patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of CR on exercise capacity, cardiovascular risk factors, and long-term mortality and morbidity, as well as predictors for enrolment in or failing to complete CR. METHODS: A review of medical records identified 250 patients who underwent heart valve surgery between January 2009 and August 2013...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention
Nicola Maurea, Carmela Coppola, Giovanna Piscopo, Francesca Galletta, Gennaro Riccio, Emanuela Esposito, Claudia De Lorenzo, Michelino De Laurentiis, Paolo Spallarossa, Giuseppe Mercuro
The progress in cancer therapy and the increase in number of long-term survivors reveal the issue of cardiovascular side-effects of anticancer drugs. Cardiotoxicity has become a significant problem, and the risks of adverse cardiac events induced by systemic drugs need to be seriously considered. Potential cardiovascular toxicities linked to anticancer agents include arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension, thromboembolism, left ventricular dysfunction, and heart failure. It has been shown that several anticancer drugs seriously affect the cardiovascular system, such as ErbB2 inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, multitargeted kinase inhibitors, Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog inhibitors, and others...
May 2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine
Sven Reek
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been available for over a decade. In recent years, the device has been prescribed increasingly for a wide range of indications. The purpose of this review is to describe the technical and clinical aspects of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator. The available literature on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness is reviewed, and indications for use will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been used successfully in more than 100 000 patients for a variety of indications...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Cardiology
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Peter Nilsson
A number of chronic disease conditions tend to cluster in families with an increased risk in first-degree relatives, but also an increased risk in second-degree relatives. This fact is most often referred to as the heritability (heredity) of these diseases and explained by the influence of genetic factors, or shared environment, even if the more specific details or mechanism leading to disease are not known. New methods have to be explored in screening studies and register linkage studies to define and measure consequences of a positive family history of disease...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Junichiro Hashimoto
Arterial structure and function change progressively with advancing age. Owing to long-lasting repetitive stretch with intermittent cardiac contraction, elastic fibers in the tunica media of large arteries gradually degenerate and are replaced by collagenous fibers. Such medial degeneration causes elastic arteries to stiffen and dilate. However, the speed of the vascular aging varies considerably among individuals; a discrepancy often exists between the chronological age of an individual and the biological age of his or her arteries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jong-Chan Youn
Immunosenescence, defined as the age-associated dysregulation and dysfunction of the immune system, is characterized by impaired protective immunity and decreased efficacy of vaccines. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. An increasing number of immunological, clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with accelerated aging of the immune system and T cell immunosenescence especially...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Whelton
BACKGROUND: Choice of the optimal target for blood pressure (BP) reduction during treatment of patients with hypertension, including those with underlying co-morbid conditions, is an important challenge in clinical practice. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was designed to provide guidance in selection of a Systolic BP target during treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Adults ≥50 years old with hypertension and at least one additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but excluding persons with diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) were randomly assigned to intensive therapy (intensive), targeting a systolic BP (SBP) <120 mmHg, or standard therapy (standard), targeting a SBP <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Stephen Robert Daniels
Hypertension in children and adolescents is associated with both short and long-term abnormalities in the cardiovascular system. Ultimately, these changes can lead to myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure and chronic renal disease, all of which are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality.In the short term, the best evidence that hypertension is adversely impacting the heart and vasculature is the development of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased vascular stiffness and endothelial dysfunction...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Suzanne Oparil
Heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure are leading causes of death worldwide, and hypertension is a significant risk factor for each. Hypertension is less common in women, compared to men, in those younger than 45 years of age. This trend is reversed in those 65 years and older. In the US between 2011-2014, the prevalence of hypertension in women and men by age group was 6% vs 8% (18-39 years), 30% vs 35% (40-59 years), and 67% vs 63% (60 years and over). Awareness, treatment, and control rates differ between genders with women being more aware of their diagnosis (85% vs 80%), more likely to take their medications (81% vs 71%) and more frequently having controlled hypertension (55% vs 49%)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Manan Pareek, Mette Lundgren Nielsen, Margrét Leósdóttir, Peter M Nilsson, Michael Hecht Olsen
OBJECTIVE: To explore the independent prognostic value of left ventricular (LV) mass, diastolic function, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for the prediction of incident cardiac events in a random population sample. DESIGN AND METHOD: 415 women and 999 men aged 56-79 years, included between 2002-2006, underwent echocardiography based on groups defined by FPG, i.e. normal (NFG): FPG ≤ 6.0 mmol/L; impaired (IFG): FPG 6.1-6.9 mmol/L; and diabetes mellitus (DM): FPG ≥ 7...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Chan Joo Lee, Jaewon Oh, Sang-Hak Lee, Seok-Min Kang, Donghoon Choi, Hyeon-Chang Kim, Sungha Park
OBJECTIVE: Treatment of hypertension has been shown to reduce mortality and cardiovascular events in high risk hypertension. However, there is a paucity of evidence on benefit of management for hypertension in patients with low cardiovascular risk. We aimed to determine the benefit in reducing mortality for hypertensive patients without previous cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM) or chronic kidney disease (CKD). DESIGN AND METHOD: Hypertensive patients were selected from Korea National Health Insurance sample cohort, a retrospective cohort selected to be representative of the total eligible Korean population in 2002...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Rha Seung-Woon, Choi Byoung Geol, Li Hu, Na Jin Oh, Choi Cheol Ung, Park Chang Gyu, Seo Hong Seog, Oh Dong Joo, Kim Yong Hoon, Her Ae-Young, Park Sang-Ho
OBJECTIVE: Hypertension (HTN) and its organ damage such as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) can lead to worsening heart failure, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, there are limited data regarding the impact of LVH in HTN patients (pts) who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug eluting stents (DESs) on long-term clinical outcomes. DESIGN AND METHOD: A total of 1,704 consecutive HTN pts who underwent PCI from 2004 to 2014 were enrolled...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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