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Bad news

Jacob Arnold, Jennifer Tango, Ian Walker, Chris Waranch, Joshua McKamie, Zafrina Poonja, Anne Messman
Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kathy Cozonac
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
I Bragard, M Guillaume, A Ghuysen, J C Servotte, I Ortiz, B Pétré
The transformations of the health system and the preferences of the patients themselves have led healthcare professionals to rethink the place and role of the patient in the healthcare system, putting the caregivercare relationship and communication at the heart of public health issues. The literature shows that empathic communication is associated with better adherence to treatment, better patient satisfaction and less litigation. However, the initial training programs of health professionals are little oriented towards this field...
February 2018: Revue Médicale de Liège
Jessica M Goldonowicz, Michael S Runyon, Mark J Bullard
BACKGROUND: To investigate the value of a novel simulation-based palliative care educational intervention within an emergency medicine (EM) residency curriculum. METHODS: A palliative care scenario was designed and implemented in the simulation program at an urban academic emergency department (ED) with a 3-year EM residency program. EM residents attended one of eight high-fidelity simulation sessions, in groups of 5-6. A standardized participant portrayed the patient's family member...
March 7, 2018: BMC Palliative Care
Felix Michael Schmitz, Kai Philipp Schnabel, Daniel Bauer, Cadja Bachmann, Ulrich Woermann, Sissel Guttormsen
OBJECTIVES: Effective instructional approaches are needed to enable undergraduates to optimally prepare for the limited training time they receive with simulated patients (SPs). This study examines the learning effects of different presentation formats of a worked example on student SP communication. METHODS: Sixty-seven fourth-year medical students attending a mandatory communication course participated in this randomized field trial. Prior to the course, they worked through an e-learning module that introduced the SPIKES protocol for delivering bad news to patients...
February 24, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Benjamin Derbez
Time has long been considered as an important dimension of the process of disclosure of information about genetic risk to kin. The question of the "right time to tell" has been frequently noticed but seldom placed at the centre of the analyses of social scientists. Based on an ethnographical fieldwork in a French cancer genetics clinic, this article aims to show that many dimensions of the practical issues of disclosure to family can be fruitfully addressed through the temporal lens of kairos. Relying on the case of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk, it firstly highlights the existence of a mismatch between the "chronological" time of prevention proposed by professionals and the "kairological" time of disclosure lived by informants...
February 23, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Jennifer N Stojan, Eleanor Y Sun, Arno K Kumagai
PURPOSE: Educational approaches involving patient stories aim at enhancing empathy and patient-centered care; however, it is not known whether the influence of such programs on physician attitudes persists beyond medical school. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Family Centered Experience (FCE) paired preclinical medical students with patient families over two years and engaged students in reflective dialogs about the volunteers' stories. This study examined possible long-term influences on attitudes toward medicine and doctoring...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
David M Cutler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 27, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Afsaneh Yakhforoshha, Seyed Amir Hossein Emami, Farhad Shahi, Saeed Shahsavari, Mohammadali Cheraghi, Rita Mojtahedzadeh, Behrooz Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Mandana Shirazi
The task of breaking bad news (BBN) may be improved by incorporating simulation with art-based teaching methods. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of an integrating simulation with art-based teaching strategies, on fellows' performance regarding BBN, in Iran. The study was carried out using quasi-experimental methods, interrupted time series. The participants were selected from medical oncology fellows at two teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. Participants were trained through workshop, followed by engaging participants with different types of art-based teaching methods...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
Sushma Bhatnagar, Anuradha Patel
Background: Palliative medicine is an upcoming new specialty aimed at relieving suffering, improving quality of life and comfort care. There are many challenges and barriers in providing palliative care to our patients. The major challenge is lack of knowledge, attitude and skills among health-care providers. Objectives: Evaluate the effectiveness of the certificate course in essentials of palliative care (CCEPC) program on the knowledge in palliative care among the participants...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Palliative Care
Avery D Faigenbaum
The good news is that a growing body of evidence recognizes resistance training as foundational to long-term physical development. Original research and reviews published in 2017 conclude that early exposure to developmentally appropriate resistance training can improve markers of health, increase muscular fitness, enhance physical literacy, and reduce the risk of injury in young athletes. Although the papers discussed in the commentary add to our understanding of the pleiotropic benefits of youth resistance training, they also raise concerns...
February 1, 2018: Pediatric Exercise Science
Mohammad Ali Morowatisharifabad, Tahereh Rahimi, Tahmineh Farajkhoda, Hossein Fallahzadeh, Siamak Mohebi
Background: Despite the important role of feelings in health care seeking behavior (HCSB), this subject has not yet been adequately investigated. HCSB-related feelings begin with the onset of disease symptoms and persist in different forms after treatment. The aim of current study was to explore the feelings that women of reproductive age experience when they seek health care. Methods: In this deductive, qualitative content analysis, participants were selected by purposeful sampling. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 17 women of reproductive age and 5 health care staffs in Qom, Iran were carried out until data saturation was achieved...
2018: Health Promotion Perspectives
Geoff Norman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Richard deShazo, McKenzie Johnson, Ike Eriator, Kathryn Rodenmeyer
Epidemics of opioid use are old news in the United States, but an epidemic that kills over 200,000 Americans is not. A multiplicity of intertwined factors have brought us to this place. From 30,000 feet, it is the story of good intentions gone bad, a drug industry gone rogue, and government watch dog agencies gone to sleep. At ground level, it is the story of physicians unfamiliar with addictive drugs and drug addiction, new long acting opioids deceptively marketed, cheap black tar heroin, encouragement to use opioids for chronic non-cancer pain by professional organizations with conflicts of interest and without science, a culture intolerant to pain and tolerant to drug use, and the greedy response of the pharmaceutical industry and drug cartels to an expanding market opportunity...
January 31, 2018: American Journal of Medicine
Sophie Lelorain, Stéphane Cattan, Florian Lordick, Anja Mehnert, Christophe Mariette, Véronique Christophe, Alexis Cortot
OBJECTIVE: In cancer settings, physician empathy is not always linked to a better patient emotional quality of life quality of life (eQoL). We tested two possible moderators of the inconsistent link: type of consultation (bad news versus follow-up) and patient emotional skills (emoSkills, i.e., the way patients process emotional information). METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 296 thoracic and digestive tract cancer patients completed validated questionnaires to assess their physician empathy, their emoSkills and eQoL...
February 1, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Paweł Marschollek, Katarzyna Bąkowska, Wojciech Bąkowski, Karol Marschollek, Radosław Tarkowski
The way that bad news is disclosed to a cancer patient has a crucial impact on physician-patient cooperation and trust. Consensus-based guidelines provide widely accepted tools for disclosing unfavorable information. In oncology, the most popular one is called the SPIKES protocol. A 17-question survey was administered to a group of 226 patients with cancer (mean age 59.6 years) in order to determine a level of SPIKES implementation during first cancer disclosure. In our assessment, the patients felt that the highest compliance with the SPIKES protocol was with Setting up (70...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
Cherelle M V van Stenus, Magda M Boere-Boonekamp, Erna F G M Kerkhof, Ariana Need
PROBLEM: It is unknown if client experiences with perinatal healthcare differ between low-risk and high-risk women. BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, risk selection divides pregnant women into low- and high-risk groups. Receiving news that a pregnancy or childbirth has an increased likelihood of complications can cause elevated levels of emotional distress. AIM: The purpose of this study is to describe client experiences with perinatal healthcare and to determine which, if any, background characteristics, pregnancy circumstances, childbirth or follow-up care characteristics are explaining variables of differences in client experiences between high-risk and low-risk women...
January 26, 2018: Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives
Andreas Kappes, Nadira S Faber, Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu, Molly J Crockett
An optimistic learning bias leads people to update their beliefs in response to better-than-expected good news but neglect worse-than-expected bad news. Because evidence suggests that this bias arises from self-concern, we hypothesized that a similar bias may affect beliefs about other people's futures, to the extent that people care about others. Here, we demonstrated the phenomenon of vicarious optimism and showed that it arises from concern for others. Participants predicted the likelihood of unpleasant future events that could happen to either themselves or others...
January 1, 2018: Psychological Science
Amulya A Nageswara Rao, Deepti M Warad, Amy L Weaver, Cathy D Schleck, Vilmarie Rodriguez
Pediatric hematologists/oncologists face complex situations such as breaking bad news, treatment/clinical trials discussions, and end-of-life/hospice care. With increasing diversity in patient and physician populations, cultural competency and sensitivity training covering different aspects of pediatric hematology/oncology (PDHO) care can help improve health care delivery and reduce disparities. Though it is considered a required component of fellowship training, there is no clearly defined curriculum meant specifically for PDHO fellows-in-training (PDHO-F)...
January 27, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
José Atienza-Carrasco, Manuel Linares-Abad, María Padilla-Ruiz, Isabel María Morales-Gil
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 23, 2018: Reproductive Health
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