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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898142/sv%C3%A3-ra-samtal-med-patienter-tr%C3%A3-nas-p%C3%A3-kurs-med-sk%C3%A3-despelare-en-medveten-strategi-hj%C3%A3-lper-b%C3%A3-de-l%C3%A3-kare-och-patient
#1
Anders Danielsson, Hanna Dahlstrand, Franziska Edvinsson, Mattias Tranberg, Anna Wrangsjö, Carl-Johan Fürst
The physician's communication skill influences the patient's mental and physical wellbeing, as well as the physician's own experience of stress. Most patients wish to be informed about their disease, by physicians who are honest, gives time, sustains hope, listens and shows compassion and empathy. Even though there are established guidelines on how to break bad news, the physician must find out and respond to the unique reactions and needs of each individual, in order to communicate successfully. There is no consensus on how to construct and evaluate communication skills training programs for physicians, and more RCT-studies are requested...
November 22, 2016: Läkartidningen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27876220/breaking-bad-news-to-patients-with-cancer-a-randomized-control-trial-of-a-brief-communication-skills-training-module-incorporating-the-stories-and-preferences-of-actual-patients
#2
James Gorniewicz, Michael Floyd, Koyamangalath Krishnan, Thomas W Bishop, Fred Tudiver, Forrest Lang
OBJECTIVE: This study tested the effectiveness of a brief, learner-centered, breaking bad news (BBN) communication skills training module using objective evaluation measures. METHODS: This randomized control study (N=66) compared intervention and control groups of students (n=28) and residents' (n=38) objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performance of communication skills using Common Ground Assessment and Breaking Bad News measures. RESULTS: Follow-up performance scores of intervention group students improved significantly regarding BBN (colon cancer (CC), p=0...
November 13, 2016: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857266/my-personal-journey-with-ovarian-cancer-treatment-caring-and-chemotherapy-tips
#3
Kim A Decker
Six years ago, I was diagnosed with stage IIIA ovarian low malignant cell potential cancer. It was the most shocking situation I have ever experienced. I didn't realize I had any symptoms, except occasional back pain, which I attributed to starting a new workout program. I had scheduled an abdominal computerized tomography (CT) scan for recurrent microscopic hematuria, which my internist wanted to check. I was told I would hear the results in two days. Two hours after my CT scan, while I was eating ice cream and watching television, an on-call genitourinary doctor (who I did not personally know) called to tell me the good news-that I had kidney stones, thus the microscopic hematuria...
December 1, 2016: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856725/the-bad-is-black-effect-why-people-believe-evildoers-have-darker-skin-than-do-gooders
#4
Adam L Alter, Chadly Stern, Yael Granot, Emily Balcetis
Across six studies, people used a "bad is black" heuristic in social judgment and assumed that immoral acts were committed by people with darker skin tones, regardless of the racial background of those immoral actors. In archival studies of news articles written about Black and White celebrities in popular culture magazines (Study 1a) and American politicians (Study 1b), the more critical rather than complimentary the stories, the darker the skin tone of the photographs printed with the article. In the remaining four studies, participants associated immoral acts with darker skinned people when examining surveillance footage (Studies 2 and 4), and when matching headshots to good and bad actions (Studies 3 and 5)...
December 2016: Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848418/a-safe-way-to-talk-about-death
#5
(no author information available yet)
Could a learning disability-specific death cafe be the key to initiating conversations about death and dying in a safe way? Paula Hopes writes in Learning Disability Practice about a conference on breaking bad news and noted that while some people with learning disabilities were ready to deal with the issues, healthcare professionals were not. Reasons varied from protecting people with learning disabilities to the assumption that they cannot cope with or understand the information. Ms Hopes says nurses should be advocates for people with learning disabilities and provide them with information to engage them in the process of dying...
November 9, 2016: Nursing Standard
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27836628/optimistic-update-bias-holds-firm-three-tests-of-robustness-following-shah-et-al
#6
Neil Garrett, Tali Sharot
A diverse body of research has demonstrated that people update their beliefs to a greater extent when receiving good news compared to bad news. Recently, a paper by Shah et al. claimed that this asymmetry does not exist. Here we carefully examine the experiments and simulations described in Shah et al. and follow their analytic approach on our data sets. After correcting for confounds we identify in the experiments of Shah et al., an optimistic update bias for positive life events is revealed. Contrary to claims made by Shah et al...
November 8, 2016: Consciousness and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27833489/perioperative-death-its-implications-and-management
#7
REVIEW
J P Attri, R Makhni, V Chatrath, N Bala, R Kumar, P Jain
Death to most people is a major life event. Nothing in this world prepares us to face and manage the perioperative death although the majority of anesthesiologists will be involved in an intraoperative death during the course of their careers. Whether death on the table was expected or occurred when least expected or may be even later, the anesthesiologist is most likely to be affected emotionally, physically in his personal life, and as well as will have an influence on his professional career. Anesthesiologists as perioperative physicians are likely to experience death on the operating table at some time in their careers...
October 2016: Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27829646/october-surprises
#8
(no author information available yet)
Ushered in with the rampage of Hurricane Matthew, later days brightened in this month that has often been harbinger of both good and bad news for Cuba and the world. Hurricane Matthew ripped through Eastern Cuba, devastating the historic town of Baracoa (Cuba's first capital, founded in 1511) and the village of Maisí, where the morning sun first rises over Cuban territory. Wind and flood leveled hundreds of homes, brought down the power grid and destroyed crops. Yet there was no loss of human life, unlike in neighboring Haiti and other countries in Matthew's path, and unlike in Cuba in 1963, when Hurricane Flora caused more than 1200 deaths...
October 2016: MEDICC Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826268/creativity-and-cognitive-skills-among-millennials-thinking-too-much-and-creating-too-little
#9
Brice Corgnet, Antonio M Espín, Roberto Hernán-González
Organizations crucially need the creative talent of millennials but are reluctant to hire them because of their supposed lack of diligence. Recent studies have shown that hiring diligent millennials requires selecting those who score high on the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) and thus rely on effortful thinking rather than intuition. A central question is to assess whether the push for recruiting diligent millennials using criteria such as cognitive reflection can ultimately hamper the recruitment of creative workers...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27824769/palliative-care-in-obstetrics-and-gynecology
#10
Carolyn Lefkowits, Caroline Solomon
Palliative care is specialized care for people with life-limiting illness; it focuses on symptom management and quality of life and ensures that a patient's care is concordant with her goals and values. Unlike end-of-life care, palliative care can be offered concurrently with disease-directed therapies, including when the goal is cure. Obstetrics and gynecology patients for whom palliative care is most appropriate include women with gynecologic cancer and women with a fetus or neonate with a potentially life-limiting illness...
December 2016: Obstetrics and Gynecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27817247/breaking-bad-news-to-patients-with-spinal-cord-injury-in-turkey-physiatrists-perspective
#11
Ozden Ozyemisci-Taskiran, Isil Irem Budakoglu, Ozlem Coskun, Nesrin Demirsoy
OBJECTIVE: To explore Turkish physiatrists' experiences and opinions about breaking bad news (BBN) to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: A cross sectional study. SETTING: Turkey. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-nine physiatrists completed a questionnaire about experiences and opinions regarding BBN and self-assessment of communication skills (CS). RESULTS: Eleven percent of specialists and 53% of residents were trained on basic CS...
November 7, 2016: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27809563/radiologist-found-liable-for-malpractice-in-israel-for-causing-a-patient-s-suicide-by-sending-a-bad-news-report-can-this-happen-in-the-united-states
#12
Leonard Berlin, Jacob Sosna, Dan Halevy
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to present an example of a non-U.S. lawsuit in which a radiologist was found negligent in the case of a psychiatric patient who died by suicide after reading a radiology report sent directly to him. CONCLUSION: Although the lawsuit and its outcome do not influence laws in the United States or any country other than the one in which the case was tried, it should stimulate the radiologic community into giving serious thought to the format and manner in which reports of radiologic examinations are communicated to patients...
November 3, 2016: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27804909/factors-associated-with-patient-preferences-for-communication-of-bad-news
#13
Maiko Fujimori, Tatsuo Akechi, Yosuke Uchitomi
OBJECTIVE: Communication based on patient preferences can alleviate their psychological distress and is an important part of patient-centered care for physicians who have the task of conveying bad news to cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the demographic, medical, and psychological factors associated with patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news. METHODS: Outpatients with a variety of cancers were consecutively invited to participate in our study after their follow-up medical visit...
November 2, 2016: Palliative & Supportive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27782961/using-the-objective-structured-clinical-exam-osce-to-assess-acgme-competencies-in-pediatric-gastroenterology-fellows
#14
Aliza B Solomon, Rachel Reed, Keith Benkov, Joseph Kingsbery, Sarah S Lusman, Lisa B Malter, Jeremiah Levine, Simon Rabinowitz, Martin Wolff, Sondra Zabar, Elizabeth Weinshel
BACKGROUND: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has described six core competencies with which trainees should demonstrate proficiency. Using the Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), we aimed to assess four of these competencies among Pediatric GI fellows (PG). METHODS: Eight first-year PG's from six medical centers in the New York area participated in a four-station OSCE with trained standardized patient (SP) actors. The cases included an "ED Consult" for lower GI bleeding; "Breaking Bad News" focusing on CF nutritional complications; "Second Opinion" for abdominal pain; "Transition of Care" for inflammatory bowel disease...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27769080/first-counseling-revealing-the-diagnosis-of-childhood-cancer-parent-preferences-from-an-indian-perspective
#15
Gem Mohan, Julius X Scott, Rizwana Nasrin, Latha Sneha, Rakesh Manohar, Lalitha Subramanian, Sowmiya Narayani, Aruna Rajendran
BACKGROUND: The first counseling or the exchange between the physician and the parent(s) of children with cancer is of vital importance as it sets the tone for the rest of the treatment. The goal of our study was to find out the preferences among parents of Indian children with cancer regarding communication and breaking of bad news when fully informed about the diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 60 parents who had been counseled within 3 months from diagnosis were interviewed with a prepared questionnaire directed at eliciting their experiences with the physicians who broke the bad news to them and also suggestions to improve the exchange...
November 2016: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27757736/brief-report-reduced-optimism-bias-in-self-referential-belief-updating-in-high-functioning-autism
#16
Bojana Kuzmanovic, Lionel Rigoux, Kai Vogeley
Previous research has demonstrated irrational asymmetry in belief updating: people tend to take into account good news and neglect bad news. Contradicting formal learning principles, belief updates were on average larger after better-than-expected information than after worse-than-expected information. In the present study, typically developing subjects demonstrated this optimism bias in self-referential judgments. In contrast, adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were significantly less biased when updating self-referential beliefs (each group n = 21, matched for age, gender and IQ)...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754573/what-is-important-for-student-nurses-to-know-about-cancer-treatment-and-care-a-qualitative-study-of-student-nurses-and-stakeholder-perspectives
#17
Deborah Edwards, Sally Anstey, Daniel Kelly, Jessica Ballie, Jane Hopkinson
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the views of student nurses' and stakeholders of what is important for student nurses to know about cancer treatment and care. BACKGROUND: Worldwide, the number of people living with cancer is increasing because the population is aging and effective cancer treatments are prolonging survival. All nurses need knowledge, skills, confidence and competence to support people living with cancer. Education is an important tool in preparing a nursing workforce that can support people affected by cancer...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27749945/ethics-emotions-and-the-skills-of-talking-about-progressing-disease-with-terminally-ill-adolescents-a-review
#18
Abby R Rosenberg, Joanne Wolfe, Lori Wiener, Maureen Lyon, Chris Feudtner
Importance: For clinicians caring for adolescent patients living with progressive, life-threatening illness, discussions regarding prognosis, goals of care, and treatment options can be extremely challenging. While clinicians should respect and help to facilitate adolescents' emerging autonomy, they often must also work with parents' wishes to protect patients from the emotional distress of hearing bad news. Observations: We reviewed the ethical justifications for and against truth-telling, and we considered the published ethical and practice guidance, as well as the perspectives of patients, parents, and clinicians involved in these cases...
December 1, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27742386/the-bad-and-the-good-news-on-cancer-immunotherapy-implications-for-organ-transplant-recipients
#19
Umberto Maggiore, Julio Pascual
Cancer immunotherapy, especially the use of checkpoint inhibitors, is expanding and can be efficacious in organ transplant recipients with malignant neoplasia. In this review, we summarize clinical findings and evolution of several patients treated with CTL4-4 or PD-1 inhibitors reported in the literature. The CTL-4 inhibitor ipilimumab has been safely used in several liver and kidney allograft recipients. PD1-inhibitors look promising for tumor shrinking, but acute rejection is the rule, so they should be avoided in recipients of life-saving organs...
September 2016: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27660184/reasoning-about-truth-telling-in-end-of-life-care-of-patients-with-acute-stroke
#20
Åsa Rejnö, Gunilla Silfverberg, Britt-Marie Ternestedt
BACKGROUND: Ethical problems are a universal phenomenon but rarely researched concerning patients dying from acute stroke. These patients often have a reduced consciousness from stroke onset and thereby lack ability to convey their needs and could be described as 'incompetent' decision makers regarding their own care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of stroke team members' reasoning about truth-telling in end-of-life care due to acute stroke...
September 22, 2016: Nursing Ethics
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