keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Speech characteristics

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087124/the-acoustic-breathiness-index-abi-a-multivariate-acoustic-model-for-breathiness
#1
Ben Barsties V Latoszek, Youri Maryn, Ellen Gerrits, Marc De Bodt
OBJECTIVE: The evaluation of voice quality is a major component of voice assessment. The aim of the present study was to develop a new multivariate acoustic model for the evaluation of breathiness. METHOD: Concatenated voice samples of continuous speech and the sustained vowel [a:] from 970 subjects with dysphonia and 88 vocally healthy subjects were perceptually judged for breathiness severity. Acoustic analyses were conducted on the same concatenated voice samples after removal of the non-voiced segments of the continuous speech sample...
January 10, 2017: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076426/evidence-of-a-vocalic-proto-system-in-the-baboon-papio-papio-suggests-pre-hominin-speech-precursors
#2
Louis-Jean Boë, Frédéric Berthommier, Thierry Legou, Guillaume Captier, Caralyn Kemp, Thomas R Sawallis, Yannick Becker, Arnaud Rey, Joël Fagot
Language is a distinguishing characteristic of our species, and the course of its evolution is one of the hardest problems in science. It has long been generally considered that human speech requires a low larynx, and that the high larynx of nonhuman primates should preclude their producing the vowel systems universally found in human language. Examining the vocalizations through acoustic analyses, tongue anatomy, and modeling of acoustic potential, we found that baboons (Papio papio) produce sounds sharing the F1/F2 formant structure of the human [ɨ æ ɑ ɔ u] vowels, and that similarly with humans those vocalic qualities are organized as a system on two acoustic-anatomic axes...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063748/aspartylglucosaminuria-caused-by-a-novel-homozygous-mutation-in-the-aga-gene-was-identified-by-an-exome-first-approach-in-a-patient-from-japan
#3
Toshiyuki Yamamoto, Keiko Shimojima, Mayumi Matsufuji, Ryuichi Mashima, Eri Sakai, Torayuki Okuyama
BACKGROUND: Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). This disorder is rare in the general population except in Finland. Since the most characteristic feature of this disorder is a progressive developmental regression, patients often show no specific symptoms in the initial stages, and thus early diagnosis is often challenging. CASE REPORT: We encountered a 16-year-old boy who began to show difficulties in his speech at the age of 6years...
January 4, 2017: Brain & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056148/the-interaction-of-lexical-characteristics-and-speech-production-in-parkinson-s-disease
#4
Yi-Fang Chiu, Karen Forrest
Purpose: This study sought to investigate the interaction of speech movement execution with higher order lexical parameters. The authors examined how lexical characteristics affect speech output in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy control (HC) speakers. Method: Twenty speakers with PD and 12 healthy speakers read sentences with target words that varied in word frequency and neighborhood density. The formant transitions (F2 slopes) of the diphthongs in the target words were compared across lexical categories between PD and HC groups...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040606/steinert-syndrome-and-repercussions-in-dental-medicine
#5
REVIEW
Helena Baptista, Inês Lopes Cardoso
Steinert syndrome, also called myotonic dystrophy type 1, is a genetic disorder with autosomal dominant transmission characterized by myotonia and a multisystemic clinical picture that affects several tissues of the human body. The most common systemic phenotypes are: muscular, cardiac, respiratory, CNS, ocular, gynecological, digestive, orthopedical, as well as cognitive and psychological symptoms (cognitive decline). Muscles involved in voluntary movement are highly affected by myotonia especially distal muscles of upper limbs...
December 23, 2016: Archives of Oral Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039737/phonologic-and-acoustic-analysis-of%C3%A2-speech-following-glossectomy-and%C3%A2-the-effect-of-rehabilitation-on-speech-outcomes
#6
Jun Takatsu, Nobuhiro Hanai, Hidenori Suzuki, Masahiro Yoshida, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Seiya Tanaka, Yasuhisa Hasegawa, Masahiko Yamamoto
PURPOSE: Changes in acoustic features in the perioperative phase for elucidating the mechanisms of articulation disorder and the effect of perioperative rehabilitation were studied prospectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-two patients with 62 tongue cancer were divided into a partial glossectomy group (n = 40) and a reconstruction group (n = 22). Acoustic characteristics were analyzed during the preoperative and postoperative periods and after rehabilitation using the first and second formants of the vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/; the triangular vowel space area (tVSA); and the slopes of formant transitions...
December 11, 2016: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038762/disfluency-characteristics-of-children-with-attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-symptoms
#7
Hyunkyung Lee, Hyunsub Sim, Eunju Lee, Dahye Choi
The purpose of the current study was to investigate the characteristics of speech disfluency in 15 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and 15 age-matched control children. Reading, story retelling, and picture description tasks were used to elicit utterances from the participants. The findings indicated that children with ADHD symptoms produced significantly more stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD) and other disfluencies (OD) when compared to the control group during all three tasks...
December 21, 2016: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28032690/free-profunda-femoris-artery-perforator-flap-as-a-first-line-choice-of-reconstruction-for-partial-glossectomy-defects
#8
Ricardo Fernández-Riera, Shao-Yu Hung, Jerry Chih-Wei Wu, Chung-Kan Tsao
BACKGROUND: Free profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap has recently been brought back for head and neck reconstruction. During the course of 1 year, we performed this procedure for reconstruction of partial glossectomy defects with excellent results. METHODS: From January through December 2015, 21 patients underwent partial glossectomy reconstruction with PAP flaps. Demographics, surgical technique, anatomic variations, success rates, complications, and characteristics are described...
December 29, 2016: Head & Neck
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025834/chinese-children-s-early-knowledge-about-writing
#9
Lan Zhang, Li Yin, Rebecca Treiman
Much research on literacy development has focused on learners of alphabetic writing systems. Researchers have hypothesized that children learn about the formal characteristics of writing before they learn about the relations between units of writing and units of speech. We tested this hypothesis by examining young Chinese children's understanding of writing. Mandarin-speaking 2- to 5-year-olds completed a graphic task, which tapped their knowledge about the formal characteristics of writing, and a phonological task, which tapped their knowledge about the correspondence between Chinese characters and syllables...
December 26, 2016: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018875/diagnostic-accuracy-of-developmental-screening-in-primary-care-at-the-18-month-health-supervision-visit-a-cross-sectional-study
#10
Meta van den Heuvel, Cornelia M Borkhoff, Christine Koroshegyi, Weeda Zabih, Sijmen A Reijneveld, Jonathon Maguire, Catherine Birken, Patricia Parkin
BACKGROUND: Communication delays are often the first presenting problem in infants with a range of developmental disabilities. Our objective was to assess the validity of the 18-month Nipissing District Developmental Screen compared with the Infant Toddler Checklist, a validated tool for detecting expressive language and other communication delays. METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used. Children aged 18-20 months were recruited during scheduled health supervision visits...
October 2016: CMAJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018439/phelan-mcdermid-syndrome-presenting-with-developmental-delays-and-facial-dysmorphisms
#11
Yoon-Myung Kim, In-Hee Choi, Jun Suk Kim, Ja Hye Kim, Ja Hyang Cho, Beom Hee Lee, Gu-Hwan Kim, Jin-Ho Choi, Eul-Ju Seo, Han-Wook Yoo
Phelan-McDermid syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by the terminal or interstitial deletion of the chromosome 22q13.3. Patients with this syndrome usually have global developmental delay, hypotonia, and speech delays. Several putative genes such as the SHANK3, RAB, RABL2B, and IB2 are responsible for the neurological features. This study describes the clinical features and outcomes of Korean patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Two patients showing global developmental delay, hypotonia, and speech delay were diagnosed with Phelan-McDermid syndrome via chromosome analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis...
November 2016: Korean Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28013472/development-and-evaluation-of-wheel-controlled-pitch-adjustable-electrolarynx
#12
Li Wang, Yijun Feng, Ze Yang, Haijun Niu
Tone is important in tonal languages, especially in Mandarin. However, there is presently no commercially available electrolarynx (EL) for laryngectomized Mandarin speakers. Moreover, few studies have focused on this area. Our purpose is to design an EL that produces the four Mandarin tones and to evaluate its performance. We designed a wheel-controlled pitch-adjustable EL and manufactured a prototype (Wheel-EL). Using monosyllables, disyllabic segments, and frequently used phrases, we evaluated speech produced by Wheel-EL and by monotone (M-TruTone) and variable-frequency modes (V-TruTone) of the commercially available TruTone EL...
December 24, 2016: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28007517/re-emergent-tremor-in-parkinson-s-disease
#13
Daniele Belvisi, Antonella Conte, Matteo Bologna, Maria Carmela Bloise, Antonio Suppa, Alessandra Formica, Matteo Costanzo, Pierluigi Cardone, Giovanni Fabbrini, Alfredo Berardelli
INTRODUCTION: Re-emergent tremor (RET) is a postural tremor that appears after a variable delay in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence and the clinical characteristics of RET in a population of patients with PD. METHODS: We consecutively assessed 210 patients with PD. We collected the patients' demographic and clinical data. RET was clinically characterized in terms of latency, severity and body side affected...
December 16, 2016: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28007326/unilateral-vocal-fold-paralysis-a-systematic-review-of-speech-language-pathology-management
#14
REVIEW
Chloe Walton, Erin Conway, Helen Blackshaw, Paul Carding
OBJECTIVES: Dysphonia due to unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) can be characterized by hoarseness and weakness, resulting in a significant impact on patients' activity and participation. Voice therapy provided by a speech-language pathologist is designed to maximize vocal function and improve quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to systematically review literature surrounding the effectiveness of speech-language pathology intervention for the management of UVFP in adults...
December 19, 2016: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003643/kaufman-oculo-cerebro-facial-syndrome-in-a-child-with-small-and-absent-terminal-phalanges-and-absent-nails
#15
Ariana Kariminejad, Norbert Fonya Ajeawung, Bita Bozorgmehr, Alexandre Dionne-Laporte, Sirinart Molidperee, Kimia Najafi, Richard A Gibbs, Brendan H Lee, Raoul C Hennekam, Philippe M Campeau
Kaufman oculo-cerebro-facial syndrome (KOS) is caused by recessive UBE3B mutations and presents with microcephaly, ocular abnormalities, distinctive facial morphology, low cholesterol levels and intellectual disability. We describe a child with microcephaly, brachycephaly, hearing loss, ptosis, blepharophimosis, hypertelorism, cleft palate, multiple renal cysts, absent nails, small or absent terminal phalanges, absent speech and intellectual disability. Syndromes that were initially considered include DOORS syndrome, Coffin-Siris syndrome and Dubowitz syndrome...
December 22, 2016: Journal of Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28002840/suprasegmental-characteristics-of-spontaneous-speech-produced-in-good-and-challenging-communicative-conditions-by-talkers-aged-9-14-years
#16
Valerie Hazan, Outi Tuomainen, Michèle Pettinato
Purpose: This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of spontaneous speech by talkers aged 9-14 years and their ability to adapt these characteristics to maintain effective communication when intelligibility was artificially degraded for their interlocutor. Method: Recordings were made for 96 children (50 female participants, 46 male participants) engaged in a problem-solving task with a same-sex friend; recordings for 20 adults were used as reference. The task was carried out in good listening conditions (normal transmission) and in degraded transmission conditions...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28002839/mumbling-macho-or-morphology
#17
Melanie Weirich, Susanne Fuchs, Adrian Simpson, Ralf Winkler, Pascal Perrier
Purpose: Mumbling as opposed to clear speech is a typical male characteristic in speech and can be the consequence of a small jaw opening. Whereas behavioral reasons have often been offered to explain sex-specific differences with respect to clear speech, the purpose of this study is to investigate a potential anatomical reason for smaller jaw openings in male than in female speakers. Method: Articulatory data from 2 data sets (American English and German) were analyzed with respect to jaw opening in low vowels during speech...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27997955/cross-linguistic-differences-in-a-picture-description-task-between-korean-and-english-speaking-individuals-with-aphasia
#18
Jee Eun Sung, Gayle DeDe, Soo Eun Lee
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine cross-linguistic differences in a picture-description task between Korean- and English-speaking individuals with Broca's and anomic aphasia to determine whether a variation exists in the use of verbs and nouns across the language and aphasia groups. Method: Forty-eight individuals (male = 29; female = 19) participated in the study (n = 28 for aphasic group and n = 20 healthy controls). Data for English speakers were obtained from the Aphasia Bank Project...
December 1, 2016: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27997625/what-constitutes-a-phrase-in-sound-based-music-a-mixed-methods-investigation-of-perception-and-acoustics
#19
Kirk N Olsen, Roger T Dean, Yvonne Leung
Phrasing facilitates the organization of auditory information and is central to speech and music. Not surprisingly, aspects of changing intensity, rhythm, and pitch are key determinants of musical phrases and their boundaries in instrumental note-based music. Different kinds of speech (such as tone- vs. stress-languages) share these features in different proportions and form an instructive comparison. However, little is known about whether or how musical phrasing is perceived in sound-based music, where the basic musical unit from which a piece is created is commonly non-instrumental continuous sounds, rather than instrumental discontinuous notes...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27996973/perceptual-restoration-of-masked-speech-in-human-cortex
#20
Matthew K Leonard, Maxime O Baud, Matthias J Sjerps, Edward F Chang
Humans are adept at understanding speech despite the fact that our natural listening environment is often filled with interference. An example of this capacity is phoneme restoration, in which part of a word is completely replaced by noise, yet listeners report hearing the whole word. The neurological basis for this unconscious fill-in phenomenon is unknown, despite being a fundamental characteristic of human hearing. Here, using direct cortical recordings in humans, we demonstrate that missing speech is restored at the acoustic-phonetic level in bilateral auditory cortex, in real-time...
December 20, 2016: Nature Communications
keyword
keyword
78704
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"