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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28426286/on-the-evolution-of-lactase-persistence-in-humans
#1
Laure Ségurel, Céline Bon
Lactase persistence-the ability of adults to digest the lactose in milk-varies widely in frequency across human populations. This trait represents an adaptation to the domestication of dairying animals and the subsequent consumption of their milk. Five variants are currently known to underlie this phenotype, which is monogenic in Eurasia but mostly polygenic in Africa. Despite being a textbook example of regulatory convergent evolution and gene-culture coevolution, the story of lactase persistence is far from clear: Why are lactase persistence frequencies low in Central Asian herders but high in some African hunter-gatherers?Whywas lactase persistence strongly selected for even though milk processing can reduce the amount of lactose? Are there other factors, outside of an advantage of caloric intake, that contributed to the selective pressure for lactase persistence? It is time to revisit what we know and still do not know about lactase persistence in humans...
April 19, 2017: Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28392501/non-coding-rnas-the-trojan-horse-in-two-way-communication-between-tumor-and-stroma-in-colorectal-and-hepatocellular-carcinoma
#2
Cristina- Sorina Cătană, Martin Pichler, Gianluigi Giannelli, Robert M Mader, Ioana Berindan-Neagoe
In a continuous and mutual exchange of information, cancer cells are invariably exposed to microenvironment transformation. This continuous alteration of the genetic, molecular and cellular peritumoral stroma background has become as critical as the management of primary tumor progression events in cancer cells. The communication between stroma and tumor cells within the extracellular matrix is one of the triggers in colon and liver carcinogenesis. All non- codingRNAs including long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs and ultraconserved genes play a critical role in almost all cancers and are responsible for the modulation of the tumor microenvironment in several malignant processes such as initiation, progression and dissemination...
February 25, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28350495/out-group-threat-responses-in-group-bias-and-nonapeptide-involvement-are-conserved-across-vertebrates-a-comment-on-bruintjes-et-al-out-group-threat-promotes-within-group-affiliation-in-a-cooperative-fish
#3
Martin Kavaliers, Elena Choleris
The challenges and threats posed by out-groups have major effects on human social behavior and how individuals interact with one another. We briefly review evidence here that out-group threat similarly affects nonhuman animal behavior. Actual and potential threats posed by out-group individuals (unfamiliar and genetically nonrelated individuals of the same species) affect social behavior promoting "out-group" avoidance and "in-group" bias and enhancing in-group (familiar and/or genetically related individuals) affiliation and interactions...
April 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330987/architecture-and-mechanism-of-the-central-gear-in-an-ancient-molecular-timer
#4
REVIEW
Martin Egli
Molecular clocks are the product of natural selection in organisms from bacteria to human and their appearance early in evolution such as in the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus suggests that these timers served a crucial role in genetic fitness. Thus, a clock allows cyanobacteria relying on photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation to temporally space the two processes and avoid exposure of nitrogenase carrying out fixation to high levels of oxygen produced during photosynthesis. Fascinating properties of molecular clocks are the long time constant, their precision and temperature compensation...
March 2017: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326016/early-origin-and-evolution-of-the-angelman-syndrome-ubiquitin-ligase-gene-ube3a
#5
REVIEW
Masaaki Sato
The human Ube3a gene encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and exhibits brain-specific genomic imprinting. Genetic abnormalities that affect the maternal copy of this gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), which is characterized by severe mental retardation, speech impairment, seizure, ataxia and some unique behavioral phenotypes. In this review article, I highlight the evolution of the Ube3a gene and its imprinting to provide evolutionary insights into AS. Recent comparative genomic studies have revealed that Ube3a is most phylogenetically similar to HECTD2 among the human HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and its distant evolutionary origin can be traced to common ancestors of fungi and animals...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303116/comparative-physiology-of-energy-metabolism-fishing-for-endocrine-signals-in-the-early-vertebrate-pool
#6
REVIEW
Iris van de Pol, Gert Flik, Marnix Gorissen
Energy is the common currency of life. To guarantee a homeostatic supply of energy, multiple neuro-endocrine systems have evolved in vertebrates; systems that regulate food intake, metabolism, and distribution of energy. Even subtle (lasting) dysregulation of the delicate balance of energy intake and expenditure may result in severe pathologies. Feeding-related pathologies have fueled research on mammals, including of course the human species. The mechanisms regulating food intake and body mass are well-characterized in these vertebrates...
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289245/treatment-induced-mutagenesis-and-selective-pressures-sculpt-cancer-evolution
#7
Subramanian Venkatesan, Charles Swanton, Barry S Taylor, Joseph F Costello
Despite the great progress in our understanding of the molecular basis of human cancer, the heterogeneity of individual tumors and the evolutionary pressures imposed by therapy have hampered our ability to effectively eradicate and control this disease. How, therefore, do cancers evolve under the selective pressures of cancer therapy? Recent studies have linked both primary (or de novo) and acquired treatment resistance to intratumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution. Resistance to targeted therapies often includes mutation of the drug target itself and aberrations of pathways upstream of, downstream from, or parallel to the drug target...
March 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271480/dihydrodipicolinate-synthase-structure-dynamics-function-and-evolution
#8
F Grant Pearce, André O Hudson, Kerry Loomes, Renwick C J Dobson
Enzymes are usually comprised of multiple subunits and more often than not they are made up of identical subunits. In this review we examine lysine biosynthesis and focus on the enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase in terms of its structure, function and the evolution of its varied number of subunits (quaternary structure). Dihydrodipicolinate synthase is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of lysine, which occurs naturally in plants, bacteria, archaea and fungi, but is not synthesized in mammals. In bacteria, there have been four separate pathways identified from tetrahydrodipicolinate to meso-diaminopimelate, which is the immediate precursor to lysine...
2017: Sub-cellular Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240206/-dna-sequences-from-mobile-genetic-elements-a-hidden-half-of-the-human-genome
#9
Julie Medina, Hervé Perron
Current data estimate that mobile genetic elements represent more than one-half of the human genome. The literature is constantly updating data following the evolution of sequencing techniques and of algorithms for genome analyses. This review aims to provide an overview of the topic showing the complexity given by the various designations and classifications found in scientific papers. A particular focus is made on retrotransposons, including Endogenous RetroViruses (ERV), to introduce a second article focusing on their activation and their involvement in physiological functions and/or pathological mechanisms associated with diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)...
February 2017: Médecine Sciences: M/S
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228978/population-and-clinical-genetics-of-human-transposable-elements-in-the-post-genomic-era
#10
REVIEW
Lavanya Rishishwar, Lu Wang, Evan A Clayton, Leonardo Mariño-Ramírez, John F McDonald, I King Jordan
Recent technological developments-in genomics, bioinformatics and high-throughput experimental techniques-are providing opportunities to study ongoing human transposable element (TE) activity at an unprecedented level of detail. It is now possible to characterize genome-wide collections of TE insertion sites for multiple human individuals, within and between populations, and for a variety of tissue types. Comparison of TE insertion site profiles between individuals captures the germline activity of TEs and reveals insertion site variants that segregate as polymorphisms among human populations, whereas comparison among tissue types ascertains somatic TE activity that generates cellular heterogeneity...
2017: Mobile Genetic Elements
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220606/lamarck-rises-from-his-grave-parental-environment-induced-epigenetic-inheritance-in-model-organisms-and-humans
#11
Yan Wang, Huijie Liu, Zhongsheng Sun
Organisms can change their physiological/behavioural traits to adapt and survive in changed environments. However, whether these acquired traits can be inherited across generations through non-genetic alterations has been a topic of debate for over a century. Emerging evidence indicates that both ancestral and parental experiences, including nutrition, environmental toxins, nurturing behaviour, and social stress, can have powerful effects on the physiological, metabolic and cellular functions in an organism...
February 20, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213398/foxo-integration-of-insulin-signaling-with-glucose-and-lipid-metabolism
#12
REVIEW
Sojin Lee, H Henry Dong
The forkhead box O family consists of FoxO1, FoxO3, FoxO4 and FoxO6 proteins in mammals. Expressed ubiquitously in the body, the four FoxO isoforms share in common the amino DNA-binding domain, known as 'forkhead box' domain. They mediate the inhibitory action of insulin or insulin-like growth factor on key functions involved in cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, oxidative stress, senescence, autophagy and aging. Genetic mutations in FoxO genes or abnormal expression of FoxO proteins are associated with metabolic disease, cancer or altered lifespan in humans and animals...
May 2017: Journal of Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202622/the-hypertension-pandemic-an-evolutionary-perspective
#13
REVIEW
Bernard C Rossier, Murielle Bochud, Olivier Devuyst
Hypertension affects over 1.2 billion individuals worldwide and has become the most critical and expensive public health problem. Hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving environmental and genetic factors together with risk-conferring behaviors. The cause of the disease is identified in ∼10% of the cases (secondary hypertension), but in 90% of the cases no etiology is found (primary or essential hypertension). For this reason, a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure in normal and hypertensive patients is the aim of very active experimental and clinical research...
March 2017: Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194132/molecular-imaging-markers-to-track-huntington-s-disease-pathology
#14
REVIEW
Heather Wilson, Rosa De Micco, Flavia Niccolini, Marios Politis
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, monogenic dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by repeat expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene. The accumulation of mutant huntingtin protein, forming intranuclear inclusions, subsequently leads to degeneration of medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortical areas. Genetic testing can identify HD gene carriers before individuals develop overt cognitive, psychiatric, and chorea symptoms. Thus, HD gene carriers can be studied in premanifest stages to understand and track the evolution of HD pathology...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167595/oropouche-virus-clinical-epidemiological-and-molecular-aspects-of-a-neglected-orthobunyavirus
#15
REVIEW
Jorge Fernando Travassos da Rosa, William Marciel de Souza, Francisco de Paula Pinheiro, Mário Luiz Figueiredo, Jedson Ferreira Cardoso, Gustavo Olszanski Acrani, Márcio Roberto Teixeira Nunes
Oropouche virus (OROV) is an important cause of arboviral illness in Latin American countries, more specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, Venezuela and Peru, as well as in other countries such as Panama. In the past decades, the clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of OROV have been published and provide the basis for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. Here, we describe the milestones in a comprehensive review of OROV epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular biology, including a description of the first isolation of the virus, the outbreaks during the past six decades, clinical aspects of OROV infection, diagnostic methods, genome and genetic traits, evolution, and viral dispersal...
February 6, 2017: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28142323/intracellular-nucleic-acid-detection-in-autoimmunity
#16
John T Crowl, Elizabeth E Gray, Kathleen Pestal, Hannah E Volkman, Daniel B Stetson
Protective immune responses to viral infection are initiated by innate immune sensors that survey extracellular and intracellular space for foreign nucleic acids. The existence of these sensors raises fundamental questions about self/nonself discrimination because of the abundance of self-DNA and self-RNA that occupy these same compartments. Recent advances have revealed that enzymes that metabolize or modify endogenous nucleic acids are essential for preventing inappropriate activation of the innate antiviral response...
January 30, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28102430/innate-and-intrinsic-antiviral-immunity-in-drosophila
#17
REVIEW
Assel Mussabekova, Laurent Daeffler, Jean-Luc Imler
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a valuable model to investigate the genetic mechanisms of innate immunity. Initially focused on the resistance to bacteria and fungi, these studies have been extended to include antiviral immunity over the last decade. Like all living organisms, insects are continually exposed to viruses and have developed efficient defense mechanisms. We review here our current understanding on antiviral host defense in fruit flies. A major antiviral defense in Drosophila is RNA interference, in particular the small interfering (si) RNA pathway...
January 19, 2017: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080995/rapid-emergence-of-pathogens-in-agro-ecosystems-global-threats-to-agricultural-sustainability-and-food-security
#18
REVIEW
Bruce A McDonald, Eva H Stukenbrock
Agricultural ecosystems are composed of genetically depauperate populations of crop plants grown at a high density and over large spatial scales, with the regional composition of crop species changing little from year to year. These environments are highly conducive for the emergence and dissemination of pathogens. The uniform host populations facilitate the specialization of pathogens to particular crop cultivars and allow the build-up of large population sizes. Population genetic and genomic studies have shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms underlying speciation processes, adaptive evolution and long-distance dispersal of highly damaging pathogens in agro-ecosystems...
December 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058671/possible-muscle-repair-in-the-human-cardiovascular-system
#19
REVIEW
Linda Sommese, Alberto Zullo, Concetta Schiano, Francesco P Mancini, Claudio Napoli
The regenerative potential of tissues and organs could promote survival, extended lifespan and healthy life in multicellular organisms. Niches of adult stemness are widely distributed and lead to the anatomical and functional regeneration of the damaged organ. Conversely, muscular regeneration in mammals, and humans in particular, is very limited and not a single piece of muscle can fully regrow after a severe injury. Therefore, muscle repair after myocardial infarction is still a chimera. Recently, it has been recognized that epigenetics could play a role in tissue regrowth since it guarantees the maintenance of cellular identity in differentiated cells and, therefore, the stability of organs and tissues...
January 5, 2017: Stem Cell Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28031352/phosphoribosyl-diphosphate-prpp-biosynthesis-enzymology-utilization-and-metabolic-significance
#20
REVIEW
Bjarne Hove-Jensen, Kasper R Andersen, Mogens Kilstrup, Jan Martinussen, Robert L Switzer, Martin Willemoës
Phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) is an important intermediate in cellular metabolism. PRPP is synthesized by PRPP synthase, as follows: ribose 5-phosphate + ATP → PRPP + AMP. PRPP is ubiquitously found in living organisms and is used in substitution reactions with the formation of glycosidic bonds. PRPP is utilized in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, the amino acids histidine and tryptophan, the cofactors NAD and tetrahydromethanopterin, arabinosyl monophosphodecaprenol, and certain aminoglycoside antibiotics...
March 2017: Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews: MMBR
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