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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29335377/heritability-of-telomere-variation-it-is-all-about-the-environment
#1
REVIEW
Hannah L Dugdale, David S Richardson
Individual differences in telomere length have been linked to survival and senescence. Understanding the heritability of telomere length can provide important insight into individual differences and facilitate our understanding of the evolution of telomeres. However, to gain accurate and meaningful estimates of telomere heritability it is vital that the impact of the environment, and how this may vary, is understood and accounted for. The aim of this review is to raise awareness of this important, but much under-appreciated point...
March 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29285971/leveraging-multiple-populations-across-time-helps-define-accurate-models-of-human-evolution-a-reanalysis-of-the-lactase-persistence-adaptation
#2
Chenling Xu Antelope, Davide Marnetto, Fergal Casey, Emilia Huerta-Sanchez
Access to a geographically diverse set of modern human samples from the present time and from ancient remains, combined with archaic hominin samples, provides an unprecedented level of resolution to study both human history and adaptation. The amount and quality of ancient human data continue to improve and enable tracking the trajectory of genetic variation over time. These data have the potential to help us redefine or generate new hypotheses of how human evolution occurred and to revise previous conjectures...
January 2017: Human Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284667/building-the-right-centriole-for-each-cell-type
#3
REVIEW
Jadranka Loncarek, Mónica Bettencourt-Dias
The centriole is a multifunctional structure that organizes centrosomes and cilia and is important for cell signaling, cell cycle progression, polarity, and motility. Defects in centriole number and structure are associated with human diseases including cancer and ciliopathies. Discovery of the centriole dates back to the 19th century. However, recent advances in genetic and biochemical tools, development of high-resolution microscopy, and identification of centriole components have accelerated our understanding of its assembly, function, evolution, and its role in human disease...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280699/study-of-the-role-of-telomerase-in-colorectal-cancer-preliminary-report-and-literature-review
#4
M Minafra, R Laforgia, M G Sederino, S Fedele, A Delvecchio, S Lattarulo, G Carbotta, G Fabiano
AIM: The aim of our study is to focus on hTERT (human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase) expression to identify tumoral tissue after a comparison to TP53 and KRAS. More than 85% of cancer cells contain genetic aberrations and also overexpression of hTERT, and, in fact, the promoter of hTERT characterizes all malignant cells. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our sample is composed of 18 patients, including 10 with CRC that underwent surgical procedure and 8 patients without CRC, which represent the control group...
September 2017: Il Giornale di Chirurgia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277877/comparative-genomics-in-drosophila
#5
Martin Oti, Attilio Pane, Michael Sammeth
Since the pioneering studies of Thomas Hunt Morgan and coworkers at the dawn of the twentieth century, Drosophila melanogaster and its sister species have tremendously contributed to unveil the rules underlying animal genetics, development, behavior, evolution, and human disease. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies launched Drosophila into the post-genomic era and paved the way for unprecedented comparative genomics investigations. The complete sequencing and systematic comparison of the genomes from 12 Drosophila species represents a milestone achievement in modern biology, which allowed a plethora of different studies ranging from the annotation of known and novel genomic features to the evolution of chromosomes and, ultimately, of entire genomes...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29259589/complete-genome-sequencing-of-mycobacterium-bovis-sp38-and-comparative-genomics-of-mycobacterium-bovis-and-m-tuberculosis-strains
#6
Cristina Kraemer Zimpel, Paulo E Brandão, Antônio F de Souza Filho, Robson F de Souza, Cássia Y Ikuta, José Soares Ferreira Neto, Naila C Soler Camargo, Marcos Bryan Heinemann, Ana M S Guimarães
Mycobacterium bovis causes bovine tuberculosis and is the main organism responsible for zoonotic tuberculosis in humans. We performed the sequencing, assembly and annotation of a Brazilian strain of M. bovis named SP38, and performed comparative genomics of M. bovis genomes deposited in GenBank. M. bovis SP38 has a traditional tuberculous mycobacterium genome of 4,347,648 bp, with 65.5% GC, and 4,216 genes. The majority of CDSs (2,805, 69.3%) have predictive function, while 1,206 (30.07%) are hypothetical. For comparative analysis, 31 M...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29213342/unique-molecular-mechanisms-for-maintenance-and-alteration-of-genetic-information-in-the-budding-yeast-saccharomyces-cerevisiae
#7
REVIEW
Sayoko Ito-Harashima, Takashi Yagi
The high-fidelity transmission of genetic information is crucial for the survival of organisms, the cells of which have the ability to protect DNA against endogenous and environmental agents, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), ionizing radiation, and various chemical compounds. The basis of protection mechanisms has been evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans; however, each organism often has a specialized mode of regulation that uses different sets of machineries, particularly in lower eukaryotes...
2017: Genes and Environment: the Official Journal of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29193359/consensus-statement-on-the-classification-of-tremors-from-the-task-force-on-tremor-of-the-international-parkinson-and-movement-disorder-society
#8
Kailash P Bhatia, Peter Bain, Nin Bajaj, Rodger J Elble, Mark Hallett, Elan D Louis, Jan Raethjen, Maria Stamelou, Claudia M Testa, Guenther Deuschl
BACKGROUND: Consensus criteria for classifying tremor disorders were published by the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society in 1998. Subsequent advances with regard to essential tremor, tremor associated with dystonia, and other monosymptomatic and indeterminate tremors make a significant revision necessary. OBJECTIVES: Convene an international panel of experienced investigators to review the definition and classification of tremor. METHODS: Computerized MEDLINE searches in January 2013 and 2015 were conducted using a combination of text words and MeSH terms: "tremor", "tremor disorders", "essential tremor", "dystonic tremor", and "classification" limited to human studies...
November 30, 2017: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153400/deciphering-pathogenicity-of-fusarium-oxysporum-from-a-phylogenomics-perspective
#9
Yong Zhang, Li-Jun Ma
Fusarium oxysporum is a large species complex of both plant and human pathogens that attack a diverse array of species in a host-specific manner. Comparative genomic studies have revealed that the host-specific pathogenicity of the F. oxysporum species complex (FOSC) was determined by distinct sets of supernumerary (SP) chromosomes. In contrast to common vertical transfer, where genetic materials are transmitted via cell division, SP chromosomes can be transmitted horizontally between phylogenetic lineages, explaining the polyphyletic nature of the host-specific pathogenicity of the FOSC...
2017: Advances in Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151869/when-evolution-is-the-solution-to-pollution-key-principles-and-lessons-from-rapid-repeated-adaptation-of-killifish-fundulus-heteroclitus-populations
#10
REVIEW
Andrew Whitehead, Bryan W Clark, Noah M Reid, Mark E Hahn, Diane Nacci
For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human-mediated environmental changes, including environmental pollution. Here we review how key features of populations, the characteristics of environmental pollution, and the genetic architecture underlying adaptive traits, may interact to shape the likelihood of evolutionary rescue from pollution. Large populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) persist in some of the most contaminated estuaries of the United States, and killifish studies have provided some of the first insights into the types of genomic changes that enable rapid evolutionary rescue from complexly degraded environments...
September 2017: Evolutionary Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151853/in-situ-conservation-harnessing-natural-and-human-derived-evolutionary-forces-to-ensure-future-crop-adaptation
#11
REVIEW
Mauricio R Bellon, Ehsan Dulloo, Julie Sardos, Imke Thormann, Jeremy J Burdon
Ensuring the availability of the broadest possible germplasm base for agriculture in the face of increasingly uncertain and variable patterns of biotic and abiotic change is fundamental for the world's future food supply. While ex situ conservation plays a major role in the conservation and availability of crop germplasm, it may be insufficient to ensure this. In situ conservation aims to maintain target species and the collective genotypes they represent under evolution. A major rationale for this view is based on the likelihood that continued exposure to changing selective forces will generate and favor new genetic variation and an increased likelihood that rare alleles that may be of value to future agriculture are maintained...
December 2017: Evolutionary Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149249/human-accelerated-regions-and-other-human-specific-sequence-variations-in-the-context-of-evolution-and-their-relevance-for-brain-development
#12
Anastasia Levchenko, Alexander Kanapin, Anastasia Samsonova, Raul Gainetdinov
The review discusses, in a format of a timeline, the studies of different types of genetic variants, present in Homo sapiens, but absent in all other primate, mammalian or vertebrate species, tested so far. The main characteristic of these variants is that they are found in regions of high evolutionary conservation. These sequence variations include single nucleotide substitutions (called human accelerated regions), deletions and segmental duplications. The rationale for finding such variations in the human genome is that they could be responsible for traits, specific to our species, of which the human brain is the most remarkable...
November 14, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144594/on-the-origin-of-obesity-identifying-the-biological-environmental-and-cultural-drivers-of-genetic-risk-among-human-populations
#13
REVIEW
A Qasim, M Turcotte, R J de Souza, M C Samaan, D Champredon, J Dushoff, J R Speakman, D Meyre
Genetic predisposition to obesity presents a paradox: how do genetic variants with a detrimental impact on human health persist through evolutionary time? Numerous hypotheses, such as the thrifty genotype hypothesis, attempt to explain this phenomenon yet fail to provide a justification for the modern obesity epidemic. In this critical review, we appraise existing theories explaining the evolutionary origins of obesity and explore novel biological and sociocultural agents of evolutionary change to help explain the modern-day distribution of obesity-predisposing variants...
November 16, 2017: Obesity Reviews: An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29139535/contribution-of-cranial-neural-crest-cells-to-mouse-skull-development
#14
Taofen Wu, Guiqian Chen, Fei Tian, Hong-Xiang Liu
The mammalian skull vault is a highly regulated structure that evolutionally protects brain growth during vertebrate development. It consists of several membrane bones with different tissue origins (e.g. neural crest-derived frontal bone and mesoderm-derived parietal bone). Although membrane bones are formed through intramembranous ossification, the neural crest-derived frontal bone has superior capabilities for osteoblast activities and bone regeneration via TGF, BMP, Wnt, and FGF signaling pathways. Neural crest (NC) cells are multipotent, and once induced, will follow specific paths to migrate to different locations of the body where they give rise to a diverse array of cell types and tissues...
2017: International Journal of Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29130157/target-discovery-for-precision-medicine-using-high-throughput-genome-engineering
#15
Xinyi Guo, Poonam Chitale, Neville E Sanjana
Over the past few years, programmable RNA-guided nucleases such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system have ushered in a new era of precision genome editing in diverse model systems and in human cells. Functional screens using large libraries of RNA guides can interrogate a large hypothesis space to pinpoint particular genes and genetic elements involved in fundamental biological processes and disease-relevant phenotypes. Here, we review recent high-throughput CRISPR screens (e.g. loss-of-function, gain-of-function, and targeting noncoding elements) and highlight their potential for uncovering novel therapeutic targets, such as those involved in cancer resistance to small molecular drugs and immunotherapies, tumor evolution, infectious disease, inborn genetic disorders, and other therapeutic challenges...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125517/genetic-epidemiology-of-neural-tube-defects
#16
Philip J Lupo, A J Agopian, Heidi Castillo, Jonathan Castillo, Gerald H Clayton, Nienke P Dosa, Betsy Hopson, David B Joseph, Brandon G Rocque, William O Walker, John S Wiener, Laura E Mitchell
It has been estimated that 60-70% of neural tube defects (NTDs) have a genetic component, but few causative genes have been identified. The lack of information on genes associated with non-syndromic NTDs in humans is especially notable as the "genomic revolution" has led to new tools (e.g., genome-wide genotyping arrays, next-generation sequencing) that are helping to elucidate the full spectrum of genetic variation (from common to rare) contributing to complex traits, including structural birth defects. However, the application of modern genomic approaches to the study of NTDs has lagged behind that of some other common structural birth defects...
October 20, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29120031/histopathological-immunohistochemical-and-stereological-analysis-of-the-effect-of-gingko-biloba-egb761-on-the-hippocampus-of-rats-exposed-to-long-term-cellphone-radiation
#17
Fikret Gevrek
Cellular phones are major sources of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) that can penetrate the human body and pose serious health hazards. The increasingly widespread use of mobile communication systems has raised concerns about the effects of cellphone radiofrequency (RF) on the hippocampus because of its close proximity to radiation during cellphone use. The effects of cellphone EMR exposure on the hippocampus of rats and the possible counteractive effects of ginkgo biloba (Egb761) were aimed to investigate...
November 9, 2017: Histology and Histopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29116640/strain-diversity-and-the-evolution-of-antibiotic-resistance
#18
Sonia Borrell, Andrej Trauner
Drug resistance is best thought of as an ongoing biological process. Resistant bacteria must emerge, become established and ultimately transmit in order to be relevant to human health. In this context, genetic diversity can influence the rate and likelihood of resistance emerging; it can also modulate the net physiological impact of resistance and the propensity of an organism to improve any defects that arise from it. Combined, these effects can have an impact on a larger scale, with highly transmissible drug-resistant bacterial strains posing a formidable threat to global health...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29108429/sources-of-spontaneous-mutagenesis-in-bacteria
#19
Jeremy W Schroeder, Ponlkrit Yeesin, Lyle A Simmons, Jue D Wang
Mutations in an organism's genome can arise spontaneously, that is, in the absence of exogenous stress and prior to selection. Mutations are often neutral or deleterious to individual fitness but can also provide genetic diversity driving evolution. Mutagenesis in bacteria contributes to the already serious and growing problem of antibiotic resistance. However, the negative impacts of spontaneous mutagenesis on human health are not limited to bacterial antibiotic resistance. Spontaneous mutations also underlie tumorigenesis and evolution of drug resistance...
November 6, 2017: Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29097520/evolution-of-life-in-urban-environments
#20
REVIEW
Marc T J Johnson, Jason Munshi-South
Our planet is an increasingly urbanized landscape, with over half of the human population residing in cities. Despite advances in urban ecology, we do not adequately understand how urbanization affects the evolution of organisms, nor how this evolution may affect ecosystems and human health. Here, we review evidence for the effects of urbanization on the evolution of microbes, plants, and animals that inhabit cities. Urbanization affects adaptive and nonadaptive evolutionary processes that shape the genetic diversity within and between populations...
November 3, 2017: Science
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