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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28528334/hormones-and-human-and-nonhuman-primate-growth
#1
Robin Miriam Bernstein
The aim of this paper was to review information pertaining to the hormonal regulation of nonhuman primate growth, with specific focus on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and adrenal androgens. Hormones of the GH-IGF axis are consistently associated with measures of growth - linear, weight, or both - during the growth period; in adulthood, concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein are not associated with any measures of size. Comparing patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) may be especially relevant for understanding whether the childhood stage of growth and development is unique to humans and perhaps other apes...
May 19, 2017: Hormone Research in Pædiatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515739/patterns-of-inter-chromosomal-gene-conversion-on-the-male-specific-region-of-the-human-y-chromosome
#2
REVIEW
Beniamino Trombetta, Eugenia D'Atanasio, Fulvio Cruciani
The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is characterized by the lack of meiotic recombination and it has long been considered an evolutionary independent region of the human genome. In recent years, however, the idea that human MSY did not have an independent evolutionary history begun to emerge with the discovery that inter-chromosomal gene conversion (ICGC) can modulate the genetic diversity of some portions of this genomic region. Despite the study of the dynamics of this molecular mechanism in humans is still in its infancy, some peculiar features and consequences of it can be summarized...
2017: Frontiers in Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514120/mouth-development
#3
REVIEW
Justin Chen, Laura A Jacox, Francesca Saldanha, Hazel Sive
A mouth is present in all animals, and comprises an opening from the outside into the oral cavity and the beginnings of the digestive tract to allow eating. This review focuses on the earliest steps in mouth formation. In the first half, we conclude that the mouth arose once during evolution. In all animals, the mouth forms from ectoderm and endoderm. A direct association of oral ectoderm and digestive endoderm is present even in triploblastic animals, and in chordates, this region is known as the extreme anterior domain (EAD)...
May 17, 2017: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511886/numtogenesis-as-a-mechanism-for-development-of-cancer
#4
REVIEW
Keshav K Singh, Aaheli Roy Choudhury, Hemant K Tiwari
Transfer of genetic material from cytoplasmic organelles to the nucleus, an ongoing process, has implications in evolution, aging, and human pathologies such as cancer. The transferred mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments in the nuclear genome are called nuclear mtDNA or NUMTs. We have named the process numtogenesis, defining the term as the transfer of mtDNA into the nuclear genome, or, less specifically, the transfer of mitochondria or mitochondrial components into the nucleus. There is increasing evidence of the involvement of NUMTs in human biology and pathology...
May 13, 2017: Seminars in Cancer Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508690/gene-polymorphisms-associated-with-temperament
#5
Xiaoyan Qiu, Graeme B Martin, Dominique Blache
When individuals are exposed to stressful environmental challenges, the response varies widely in one or more of three components: psychology, behavior and physiology. This variability among individuals can be defined as temperament. In recent years, an increasing large body of evidence suggests that the dimensions of temperament, as well as personality, psychological disorders and behavioral traits, are influenced by genetic factors, and much of the variation appears to involve variation in genes or gene polymorphisms in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the behavior-controlling neurotransmitter networks...
May 16, 2017: Journal of Neurogenetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28496051/molecular-investigations-of-development-and-diseases-of-the-brain-of-higher-mammals-using-the-ferret
#6
Hiroshi Kawasaki
The brains of higher mammals such as primates and carnivores contain well-developed unique brain structures. Uncovering the physiological functions, developmental mechanisms and evolution of these brain structures would greatly facilitate our understanding of the human brain and its diseases. Although the anatomical and electrophysiological features of these brain structures have been intensively investigated, our knowledge about their molecular bases is still limited. To overcome this limitation, genetic techniques for the brains of carnivores and primates have been established, and molecules whose expression patterns correspond to these brain structures were identified recently...
2017: Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series B, Physical and Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481398/evolutionary-trade-offs-in-kidney-injury-and-repair
#7
REVIEW
Yutian Lei, Hans-Joachim Anders
Evolutionary medicine has proven helpful to understand the origin of human disease, e.g. in identifying causal roles of recent environmental changes impacting on human physiology (environment-phenotype mismatch). In contrast, diseases affecting only a limited number of members of a species often originate from evolutionary trade-offs for usually physiologic adaptations assuring reproductive success in the context of extrinsic threats. For example, the G1 and G2 variants of the APOL1 gene supporting control of Trypanosoma infection come with the trade-off that they promote the progression of kidney disease...
May 8, 2017: Histology and Histopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28480020/the-distribution-diversity-and-conservation-status-of-cycas-in-china
#8
REVIEW
Ying Zheng, Jian Liu, Xiuyan Feng, Xun Gong
As ancient gymnosperm and woody plants, cycads have survived through dramatic tectonic activities, climate fluctuation, and environmental variations making them of great significance in studying the origin and evolution of flora biodiversity. However, they are among the most threatened plant groups in the world. The principal aim of this review is to outline the distribution, diversity, and conservation status of Cycas in China and provide suggestions for conservation practices. In this review, we describe the taxonomy, distribution, and conservation status of Cycas in China...
May 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438095/arcobacter-an-emerging-food-borne-zoonotic-pathogen-its-public-health-concerns-and-advances-in-diagnosis-and-control%C3%A2-%C3%A2-a-comprehensive-review
#9
Thadiyam Puram Ramees, Kuldeep Dhama, Kumaragurubaran Karthik, Ramswaroop Singh Rathore, Ashok Kumar, Mani Saminathan, Ruchi Tiwari, Yashpal Singh Malik, Raj Kumar Singh
Arcobacter has emerged as an important food-borne zoonotic pathogen, causing sometimes serious infections in humans and animals. Newer species of Arcobacter are being incessantly emerging (presently 25 species have been identified) with novel information on the evolutionary mechanisms and genetic diversity among different Arcobacter species. These have been reported from chickens, domestic animals (cattle, pigs, sheep, horses, dogs), reptiles (lizards, snakes and chelonians), meat (poultry, pork, goat, lamb, beef, rabbit), vegetables and from humans in different countries...
December 2017: Veterinary Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28426286/on-the-evolution-of-lactase-persistence-in-humans
#10
Laure Ségurel, Céline Bon
Lactase persistence-the ability of adults to digest the lactose in milk-varies widely in frequency across human populations. This trait represents an adaptation to the domestication of dairying animals and the subsequent consumption of their milk. Five variants are currently known to underlie this phenotype, which is monogenic in Eurasia but mostly polygenic in Africa. Despite being a textbook example of regulatory convergent evolution and gene-culture coevolution, the story of lactase persistence is far from clear: Why are lactase persistence frequencies low in Central Asian herders but high in some African hunter-gatherers?Whywas lactase persistence strongly selected for even though milk processing can reduce the amount of lactose? Are there other factors, outside of an advantage of caloric intake, that contributed to the selective pressure for lactase persistence? It is time to revisit what we know and still do not know about lactase persistence in humans...
April 19, 2017: Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28392501/non-coding-rnas-the-trojan-horse-in-two-way-communication-between-tumor-and-stroma-in-colorectal-and-hepatocellular-carcinoma
#11
REVIEW
Cristina- Sorina Cătană, Martin Pichler, Gianluigi Giannelli, Robert M Mader, Ioana Berindan-Neagoe
In a continuous and mutual exchange of information, cancer cells are invariably exposed to microenvironment transformation. This continuous alteration of the genetic, molecular and cellular peritumoral stroma background has become as critical as the management of primary tumor progression events in cancer cells. The communication between stroma and tumor cells within the extracellular matrix is one of the triggers in colon and liver carcinogenesis. All non- codingRNAs including long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs and ultraconserved genes play a critical role in almost all cancers and are responsible for the modulation of the tumor microenvironment in several malignant processes such as initiation, progression and dissemination...
April 25, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28350495/out-group-threat-responses-in-group-bias-and-nonapeptide-involvement-are-conserved-across-vertebrates-a-comment-on-bruintjes-et-al-out-group-threat-promotes-within-group-affiliation-in-a-cooperative-fish
#12
Martin Kavaliers, Elena Choleris
The challenges and threats posed by out-groups have major effects on human social behavior and how individuals interact with one another. We briefly review evidence here that out-group threat similarly affects nonhuman animal behavior. Actual and potential threats posed by out-group individuals (unfamiliar and genetically nonrelated individuals of the same species) affect social behavior promoting "out-group" avoidance and "in-group" bias and enhancing in-group (familiar and/or genetically related individuals) affiliation and interactions...
April 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330987/architecture-and-mechanism-of-the-central-gear-in-an-ancient-molecular-timer
#13
REVIEW
Martin Egli
Molecular clocks are the product of natural selection in organisms from bacteria to human and their appearance early in evolution such as in the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus suggests that these timers served a crucial role in genetic fitness. Thus, a clock allows cyanobacteria relying on photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation to temporally space the two processes and avoid exposure of nitrogenase carrying out fixation to high levels of oxygen produced during photosynthesis. Fascinating properties of molecular clocks are the long time constant, their precision and temperature compensation...
March 2017: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326016/early-origin-and-evolution-of-the-angelman-syndrome-ubiquitin-ligase-gene-ube3a
#14
REVIEW
Masaaki Sato
The human Ube3a gene encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and exhibits brain-specific genomic imprinting. Genetic abnormalities that affect the maternal copy of this gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), which is characterized by severe mental retardation, speech impairment, seizure, ataxia and some unique behavioral phenotypes. In this review article, I highlight the evolution of the Ube3a gene and its imprinting to provide evolutionary insights into AS. Recent comparative genomic studies have revealed that Ube3a is most phylogenetically similar to HECTD2 among the human HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and its distant evolutionary origin can be traced to common ancestors of fungi and animals...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303116/comparative-physiology-of-energy-metabolism-fishing-for-endocrine-signals-in-the-early-vertebrate-pool
#15
REVIEW
Iris van de Pol, Gert Flik, Marnix Gorissen
Energy is the common currency of life. To guarantee a homeostatic supply of energy, multiple neuro-endocrine systems have evolved in vertebrates; systems that regulate food intake, metabolism, and distribution of energy. Even subtle (lasting) dysregulation of the delicate balance of energy intake and expenditure may result in severe pathologies. Feeding-related pathologies have fueled research on mammals, including of course the human species. The mechanisms regulating food intake and body mass are well-characterized in these vertebrates...
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289245/treatment-induced-mutagenesis-and-selective-pressures-sculpt-cancer-evolution
#16
Subramanian Venkatesan, Charles Swanton, Barry S Taylor, Joseph F Costello
Despite the great progress in our understanding of the molecular basis of human cancer, the heterogeneity of individual tumors and the evolutionary pressures imposed by therapy have hampered our ability to effectively eradicate and control this disease. How, therefore, do cancers evolve under the selective pressures of cancer therapy? Recent studies have linked both primary (or de novo) and acquired treatment resistance to intratumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution. Resistance to targeted therapies often includes mutation of the drug target itself and aberrations of pathways upstream of, downstream from, or parallel to the drug target...
March 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271480/dihydrodipicolinate-synthase-structure-dynamics-function-and-evolution
#17
F Grant Pearce, André O Hudson, Kerry Loomes, Renwick C J Dobson
Enzymes are usually comprised of multiple subunits and more often than not they are made up of identical subunits. In this review we examine lysine biosynthesis and focus on the enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase in terms of its structure, function and the evolution of its varied number of subunits (quaternary structure). Dihydrodipicolinate synthase is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of lysine, which occurs naturally in plants, bacteria, archaea and fungi, but is not synthesized in mammals. In bacteria, there have been four separate pathways identified from tetrahydrodipicolinate to meso-diaminopimelate, which is the immediate precursor to lysine...
2017: Sub-cellular Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240206/-dna-sequences-from-mobile-genetic-elements-a-hidden-half-of-the-human-genome
#18
Julie Medina, Hervé Perron
Current data estimate that mobile genetic elements represent more than one-half of the human genome. The literature is constantly updating data following the evolution of sequencing techniques and of algorithms for genome analyses. This review aims to provide an overview of the topic showing the complexity given by the various designations and classifications found in scientific papers. A particular focus is made on retrotransposons, including Endogenous RetroViruses (ERV), to introduce a second article focusing on their activation and their involvement in physiological functions and/or pathological mechanisms associated with diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)...
February 2017: Médecine Sciences: M/S
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228978/population-and-clinical-genetics-of-human-transposable-elements-in-the-post-genomic-era
#19
REVIEW
Lavanya Rishishwar, Lu Wang, Evan A Clayton, Leonardo Mariño-Ramírez, John F McDonald, I King Jordan
Recent technological developments-in genomics, bioinformatics and high-throughput experimental techniques-are providing opportunities to study ongoing human transposable element (TE) activity at an unprecedented level of detail. It is now possible to characterize genome-wide collections of TE insertion sites for multiple human individuals, within and between populations, and for a variety of tissue types. Comparison of TE insertion site profiles between individuals captures the germline activity of TEs and reveals insertion site variants that segregate as polymorphisms among human populations, whereas comparison among tissue types ascertains somatic TE activity that generates cellular heterogeneity...
2017: Mobile Genetic Elements
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220606/lamarck-rises-from-his-grave-parental-environment-induced-epigenetic-inheritance-in-model-organisms-and-humans
#20
Yan Wang, Huijie Liu, Zhongsheng Sun
Organisms can change their physiological/behavioural traits to adapt and survive in changed environments. However, whether these acquired traits can be inherited across generations through non-genetic alterations has been a topic of debate for over a century. Emerging evidence indicates that both ancestral and parental experiences, including nutrition, environmental toxins, nurturing behaviour, and social stress, can have powerful effects on the physiological, metabolic and cellular functions in an organism...
February 20, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
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