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Human evolutionary genetics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303116/comparative-physiology-of-energy-metabolism-fishing-for-endocrine-signals-in-the-early-vertebrate-pool
#1
REVIEW
Iris van de Pol, Gert Flik, Marnix Gorissen
Energy is the common currency of life. To guarantee a homeostatic supply of energy, multiple neuro-endocrine systems have evolved in vertebrates; systems that regulate food intake, metabolism, and distribution of energy. Even subtle (lasting) dysregulation of the delicate balance of energy intake and expenditure may result in severe pathologies. Feeding-related pathologies have fueled research on mammals, including of course the human species. The mechanisms regulating food intake and body mass are well-characterized in these vertebrates...
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302556/genomics-research-for-a-new-age-examining-how-our-shared-evolutionary-history-shapes-future-disease-outcomes
#2
REVIEW
Fasil Tekola-Ayele, Emmanuel Peprah
Cardiometabolic diseases are major contributors to mortality and morbidity, and their burden displays global and regional disparities. Gene-environment interactions contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Population differences in genetic structure, ancient environmental pressures that shape the human genome, and early life environmental adversities (e.g., in utero conditions) all contribute to observed disparities in global cardiometabolic diseases. The genetic and sociocultural diversity of global populations presents opportunities for discovering genomic loci that influence cardiometabolic diseases as illustrated by a few genetic, epigenetic, and population-genetic discoveries leading to notable understanding of disease mechanisms...
March 13, 2017: Global Heart
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301472/independent-introductions-and-admixtures-have-contributed-to-adaptation-of-european-maize-and-its-american-counterparts
#3
Jean-Tristan Brandenburg, Tristan Mary-Huard, Guillem Rigaill, Sarah J Hearne, Hélène Corti, Johann Joets, Clémentine Vitte, Alain Charcosset, Stéphane D Nicolas, Maud I Tenaillon
Through the local selection of landraces, humans have guided the adaptation of crops to a vast range of climatic and ecological conditions. This is particularly true of maize, which was domesticated in a restricted area of Mexico but now displays one of the broadest cultivated ranges worldwide. Here, we sequenced 67 genomes with an average sequencing depth of 18x to document routes of introduction, admixture and selective history of European maize and its American counterparts. To avoid the confounding effects of recent breeding, we targeted germplasm (lines) directly derived from landraces...
March 16, 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301464/investigating-the-case-of-human-nose-shape-and-climate-adaptation
#4
Arslan A Zaidi, Brooke C Mattern, Peter Claes, Brian McEcoy, Cris Hughes, Mark D Shriver
The evolutionary reasons for variation in nose shape across human populations have been subject to continuing debate. An import function of the nose and nasal cavity is to condition inspired air before it reaches the lower respiratory tract. For this reason, it is thought the observed differences in nose shape among populations are not simply the result of genetic drift, but may be adaptations to climate. To address the question of whether local adaptation to climate is responsible for nose shape divergence across populations, we use Qst-Fst comparisons to show that nares width and alar base width are more differentiated across populations than expected under genetic drift alone...
March 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298902/global-distribution-and-evolutionary-history-of-enterovirus-d68-with-emphasis-on-the-2014-outbreak-in-ontario-canada
#5
Alireza Eshaghi, Venkata R Duvvuri, Sandra Isabel, Philip Banh, Aimin Li, Adriana Peci, Samir N Patel, Jonathan B Gubbay
Despite its first appearance in 1962, human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) has been recognized as an emerging respiratory pathogen in the last decade when it caused outbreaks and clusters in several countries including Japan, the Philippines, and the Netherlands. The most recent and largest outbreak of EV-D68 associated with severe respiratory illness took place in North America between August 2014 and January 2015. Between September 1 and October 31 2014, EV-D68 infection was laboratory confirmed among 153/907 (16...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28297180/human-variation-in-pelvic-shape-and-the-effects-of-climate-and-past-population-history
#6
Lia Betti
The human pelvis is often described as an evolutionary compromise (obstetrical dilemma) between the requirements of efficient bipedal locomotion and safe parturition of a highly encephalized neonate, that has led to a tight fit between the birth canal and the head and body of the foetus. Strong evolutionary constraints on the shape of the pelvis can be expected under this scenario. On the other hand, several studies have found a significant level of pelvic variation within and between human populations, a fact that seems to contradict such expectations...
April 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289245/treatment-induced-mutagenesis-and-selective-pressures-sculpt-cancer-evolution
#7
Subramanian Venkatesan, Charles Swanton, Barry S Taylor, Joseph F Costello
Despite the great progress in our understanding of the molecular basis of human cancer, the heterogeneity of individual tumors and the evolutionary pressures imposed by therapy have hampered our ability to effectively eradicate and control this disease. How, therefore, do cancers evolve under the selective pressures of cancer therapy? Recent studies have linked both primary (or de novo) and acquired treatment resistance to intratumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution. Resistance to targeted therapies often includes mutation of the drug target itself and aberrations of pathways upstream of, downstream from, or parallel to the drug target...
March 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28282382/population-genetic-analysis-of-the-darc-locus-duffy-reveals-adaptation-from-standing-variation-associated-with-malaria-resistance-in-humans
#8
Kimberly F McManus, Angela M Taravella, Brenna M Henn, Carlos D Bustamante, Martin Sikora, Omar E Cornejo
The human DARC (Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines) gene encodes a membrane-bound chemokine receptor crucial for the infection of red blood cells by Plasmodium vivax, a major causative agent of malaria. Of the three major allelic classes segregating in human populations, the FY*O allele has been shown to protect against P. vivax infection and is at near fixation in sub-Saharan Africa, while FY*B and FY*A are common in Europe and Asia, respectively. Due to the combination of strong geographic differentiation and association with malaria resistance, DARC is considered a canonical example of positive selection in humans...
March 10, 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28275194/internal-disequilibria-and-phenotypic-diversification-during-replication-of-hepatitis-c-virus-in-a-non-coevolving-cellular-environment
#9
Elena Moreno, Isabel Gallego, Josep Gregori, Adriana Lucía-Sanz, María Eugenia Soria, Victoria Castro, Nathan M Beach, Susanna C Manrubia, Josep Quer, Juan Ignacio Esteban, Charles M Rice, Jordi Gómez, Pablo Gastaminza, Esteban Domingo, Celia Perales
Viral quasispecies evolution upon long-term virus replication in a non-coevolving cellular environment raises relevant general issues such as the attainment of population equilibrium, compliance with the molecular clock hypothesis or stability of the phenotypic profile. Here we evaluate adaptation, mutant spectrum dynamics, and phenotypic diversification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the course of two hundred passages in human hepatoma cells in an experimental design that precluded coevolution of the cells with the virus...
March 8, 2017: Journal of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273063/krab-zinc-finger-proteins-contribute-to-the-evolution-of-gene-regulatory-networks
#10
Michaël Imbeault, Pierre-Yves Helleboid, Didier Trono
The human genome encodes some 350 Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain-containing zinc-finger proteins (KZFPs), the products of a rapidly evolving gene family that has been traced back to early tetrapods. The function of most KZFPs is unknown, but a few have been demonstrated to repress transposable elements in embryonic stem (ES) cells by recruiting the transcriptional regulator TRIM28 and associated mediators of histone H3 Lys9 trimethylation (H3K9me3)-dependent heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation...
March 8, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28267574/applying-evolutionary-genetics-to-developmental-toxicology-and-risk-assessment
#11
REVIEW
Maxwell C K Leung, Andrew C Procter, Jared V Goldstone, Jonathan Foox, Robert DeSalle, Carolyn J Mattingly, Mark E Siddall, Alicia R Timme-Laragy
Evolutionary thinking continues to challenge our views on health and disease. Yet, there is a communication gap between evolutionary biologists and toxicologists in recognizing the connections among developmental pathways, high-throughput screening, and birth defects in humans. To increase our capability in identifying potential developmental toxicants in humans, we propose to apply evolutionary genetics to improve the experimental design and data interpretation with various in vitro and whole-organism models...
March 4, 2017: Reproductive Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28266585/human-nde1-splicing-and-mammalian-brain-development
#12
S Mosca, M Raponi, A Meneghello, E Buratti, C G Woods, D Baralle
Exploring genetic and molecular differences between humans and other close species may be the key to explain the uniqueness of our brain and the selective pressures under which it evolves. Recent discoveries unveiled the involvement of Nuclear distribution factor E-homolog 1 (NDE1) in human cerebral cortical neurogenesis and suggested a role in brain evolution; however the evolutionary changes involved have not been investigated. NDE1 has a different gene structure in human and mouse resulting in the production of diverse splicing isoforms...
March 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265521/genetic-and-structural-study-of-dna-directed-rna-polymerase-ii-of-trypanosoma-brucei-towards-the-designing-of-novel-antiparasitic-agents
#13
Louis Papageorgiou, Vasileios Megalooikonomou, Dimitrios Vlachakis
Trypanosoma brucei brucei (TBB) belongs to the unicellular parasitic protozoa organisms, specifically to the Trypanosoma genus of the Trypanosomatidae class. A variety of different vertebrate species can be infected by TBB, including humans and animals. Under particular conditions, the TBB can be hosted by wild and domestic animals; therefore, an important reservoir of infection always remains available to transmit through tsetse flies. Although the TBB parasite is one of the leading causes of death in the most underdeveloped countries, to date there is neither vaccination available nor any drug against TBB infection...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264699/recent-range-expansion-of-an-intermediate-host-for-animal-schistosome-parasites-in-the-indo-australian-archipelago-phylogeography-of-the-freshwater-gastropod-indoplanorbis-exustus-in-south-and-southeast-asia
#14
Pauline Gauffre-Autelin, Thomas von Rintelen, Björn Stelbrink, Christian Albrecht
BACKGROUND: The planorbid snail Indoplanorbis exustus is the sole intermediate host for the Schistosoma indicum species group, trematode parasites responsible for cattle schistosomiasis and human cercarial dermatitis. This freshwater snail is widely distributed in Southern Asia, ranging from Iran to China eastwards including India and from the southeastern Himalayas to Southeast Asia southwards. The veterinary and medical importance of this snail explains the interest in understanding its geographical distribution patterns and evolutionary history...
March 6, 2017: Parasites & Vectors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264633/a-neurology-of-the-conservative-liberal-dimension-of-political-ideology
#15
Mario F Mendez
Differences in political ideology are a major source of human disagreement and conflict. There is increasing evidence that neurobiological mechanisms mediate individual differences in political ideology through effects on a conservative-liberal axis. This review summarizes personality, evolutionary and genetic, cognitive, neuroimaging, and neurological studies of conservatism-liberalism and discusses how they might affect political ideology. What emerges from this highly variable literature is evidence for a normal right-sided "conservative-complex" involving structures sensitive to negativity bias, threat, disgust, and avoidance...
March 7, 2017: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28263319/asymmetric-subgenome-selection-and-cis-regulatory-divergence-during-cotton-domestication
#16
Maojun Wang, Lili Tu, Min Lin, Zhongxu Lin, Pengcheng Wang, Qingyong Yang, Zhengxiu Ye, Chao Shen, Jianying Li, Lin Zhang, Xiaolin Zhou, Xinhui Nie, Zhonghua Li, Kai Guo, Yizan Ma, Cong Huang, Shuangxia Jin, Longfu Zhu, Xiyan Yang, Ling Min, Daojun Yuan, Qinghua Zhang, Keith Lindsey, Xianlong Zhang
Comparative population genomics offers an excellent opportunity for unraveling the genetic history of crop domestication. Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) has long been an important economic crop, but a genome-wide and evolutionary understanding of the effects of human selection is lacking. Here, we describe a variation map for 352 wild and domesticated cotton accessions. We scanned 93 domestication sweeps occupying 74 Mb of the A subgenome and 104 Mb of the D subgenome, and identified 19 candidate loci for fiber-quality-related traits through a genome-wide association study...
March 6, 2017: Nature Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28262789/iteration-expansion-and-regional-evolution-phylogeography-of-dendrobium-officinale-and-four-related-taxa-in-southern-china
#17
Beiwei Hou, Jing Luo, Yusi Zhang, Zhitao Niu, Qingyun Xue, Xiaoyu Ding
The genus Dendrobium was used as a case study to elucidate the evolutionary history of Orchidaceae in the Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) and Southeast Asia region. These evolutionary histories remain largely unknown, including the temporal and spatial distribution of the evolutionary events. The present study used nuclear and plastid DNA to determine the phylogeography of Dendrobium officinale and four closely related taxa. Plastid DNA haplotype and nuclear data were shown to be discordant, suggesting reticulate evolution drove the species' diversification...
March 6, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257525/foxp-in-tetrapoda-intrinsically-disordered-regions-short-linear-motifs-and-their-evolutionary-significance
#18
Lucas Henriques Viscardi, Luciana Tovo-Rodrigues, Pamela Paré, Nelson Jurandi Rosa Fagundes, Francisco Mauro Salzano, Vanessa Rodrigues Paixão-Côrtes, Claiton Henrique Dotto Bau, Maria Cátira Bortolini
The FOXP subfamily is probably the most extensively characterized subfamily of the forkhead superfamily, playing important roles in development and homeostasis in vertebrates. Intrinsically disorder protein regions (IDRs) are protein segments that exhibit multiple physical interactions and play critical roles in various biological processes, including regulation and signaling. IDRs in proteins may play an important role in the evolvability of genetic systems. In this study, we analyzed 77 orthologous FOXP genes/proteins from Tetrapoda, regarding protein disorder content and evolutionary rate...
March 2, 2017: Genetics and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251519/non-human-primate-models-for-brain-disorders-towards-genetic-manipulations-via-innovative-technology
#19
REVIEW
Zilong Qiu, Xiao Li
Modeling brain disorders has always been one of the key tasks in neurobiological studies. A wide range of organisms including worms, fruit flies, zebrafish, and rodents have been used for modeling brain disorders. However, whether complicated neurological and psychiatric symptoms can be faithfully mimicked in animals is still debatable. In this review, we discuss key findings using non-human primates to address the neural mechanisms underlying stress and anxiety behaviors, as well as technical advances for establishing genetically-engineered non-human primate models of autism spectrum disorders and other disorders...
April 2017: Neuroscience Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28250806/cancer-a-disease-at-the-crossroads-of-trade-offs
#20
Camille Jacqueline, Peter A Biro, Christa Beckmann, Anders Pape Moller, François Renaud, Gabriele Sorci, Aurélie Tasiemski, Beata Ujvari, Frédéric Thomas
Central to evolutionary theory is the idea that living organisms face phenotypic and/or genetic trade-offs when allocating resources to competing life-history demands, such as growth, survival, and reproduction. These trade-offs are increasingly considered to be crucial to further our understanding of cancer. First, evidences suggest that neoplastic cells, as any living entities subject to natural selection, are governed by trade-offs such as between survival and proliferation. Second, selection might also have shaped trade-offs at the organismal level, especially regarding protective mechanisms against cancer...
March 2017: Evolutionary Applications
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