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Sudden cardiac arrest

Adetola Ladejobi, Deepak K Pasupula, Shubash Adhikari, Awais Javed, Asad F Durrani, Shantanu Patil, Dingxin Qin, Shahzad Ahmad, Muhammad Bilal Munir, Shasank Rijal, Max Wayne, Evan Adelstein, Sandeep Jain, Samir Saba
BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy in survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), except in those with completely reversible causes. We sought to examine the impact of ICD therapy on mortality in survivors of SCA associated with reversible causes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated the records of 1433 patients managed at our institution between 2000 and 2012 who were discharged alive after SCA. A reversible and correctable cause was identified in 792 (55%) patients...
March 2018: Circulation. Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology
M Marin-Gracia, D Cantero-Lozano, E Garces-Anton, A Lopez-Bravo, A Garrido-Fernandez, M P Navarro-Perez, S Santos-Lasaosa, M Garces-Redondo
INTRODUCTION: Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug whose exact mechanism of action remains unknown. It acts by increasing the slow inactivation of the voltage-dependent sodium channels of the cell membranes. It is indicated in the treatment of focal seizures with or without secondary generalisation and is occasionally used as adjunct treatment in neuropathic pain. Although the most frequent side effects are mild (dizziness, diplopia, blurred vision, headache, tremor, etc.), others such as supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, changes in repolarisation, atrioventricular blocks and even cardiac arrest or sudden death have been reported...
March 16, 2018: Revista de Neurologia
Marcus Eng Hock Ong, Gavin D Perkins, Alain Cariou
Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the most time-critical medical emergency. In the second paper of this Series on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we considered important issues in the prehospital management of cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitation relies on a strong chain of survival with the community, dispatch centre, ambulance, and hospital working together. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation has the greatest impact on survival. If the community response does not restart the heart, resuscitation is continued by emergency medical services' staff...
March 10, 2018: Lancet
Amartya Kundu, Aditya Vaze, Partha Sardar, Ahmed Nagy, Wilbert S Aronow, Naomi F Botkin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Variant angina, which is characterized by recurrent chest pain and transient ECG changes along with angiographic evidence of coronary artery spasm, generally has a favorable prognosis. However, episodes of ischemia caused by vasospasm may lead to potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest, even in patients with no history of prior cardiac disease. This review describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and management of variant angina, as well as outcomes in patients who present with aborted sudden cardiac death (ASCD)...
March 8, 2018: Current Cardiology Reports
Yingying Hu, Jun Xu, Huadong Zhu, Guoxiu Zhang, Feng Sun, Yazhi Zhang, Xuezhong Yu
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the status of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with sudden cardiac arrest (CA) in the emergency department. METHODS: A multicenter prospective observational study was conducted. The patients with CA admitted to 13 hospitals from 6 provinces in four different regions, including North China, Southern China, East China, Southwest China, from July 1st, 2015 to July 31st, 2017 were enrolled. A modified Utstein template was applied to collect clinical data, including general data, CA related data and prognosis, and primary outcome indicator was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate, and the secondary outcome indicator was 28-day survival rate...
March 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Valentina Kutyifa, Usama Daimee, Scott McNitt, Bronislava Polonsky, Charles Lowenstein, Kris Cutter, Coeli Lopes, Wojciech Zareba, Arthur J Moss
BACKGROUND: A comprehensive report on the clinical course of the three major genotypes of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) in a large U.S. patient cohort is lacking. METHODS: Our study consisted of 1,923 U.S. subjects from the Rochester-based LQTS Registry with genotype-positive LQT1 (n = 879), LQT2 (n = 807), and LQT3 (n = 237). We evaluated the risk of a first cardiac event (syncope, aborted cardiac arrest, or sudden cardiac death, whichever occurred first) from birth through age 50 years...
March 5, 2018: Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology
Muthiah Vaduganathan, Brian L Claggett, Neal A Chatterjee, Inder S Anand, Nancy K Sweitzer, James C Fang, Eileen O'Meara, Sanjiv J Shah, Sheila M Hegde, Akshay S Desai, Eldrin F Lewis, Jean Rouleau, Bertram Pitt, Marc A Pfeffer, Scott D Solomon
BACKGROUND: Sudden death (SD) may be an important mode of death in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). OBJECTIVES: To investigate rates and predictors of SD or aborted cardiac arrest (ACA) in HFpEF. METHODS: We studied 1,767 patients with HFpEF (EF≥45%) enrolled in the Americas region of the TOPCAT trial. We identified independent predictors of composite SD/ACA with step-wise backward selection using competing risks regression analysis accounting for non-sudden causes of death...
March 4, 2018: JACC. Heart Failure
Syed Rafay Ali Sabzwari, Zoltan Varga, Khurram Butt, Nimra Khan
Vasospastic angina (VSA), also known as variant or Prinzmetal's angina, is a relatively uncommon cause of retrosternal chest pain with transient ST segment elevation, mainly due to vasospasm in the coronary arteries. This is a case of 37-year-old female who presented with chest pain and syncope. Her initial workup, including echocardiogram, was negative. Subsequently, she was sent home with an event monitor. During the next two weeks, she continued to have recurrent episodes of similar chest pains and presented to her cardiology appointment with a heart rate of 45 bpm and blood pressure of 100/60 mmHg and was taken to hospital emergency department...
December 16, 2017: Curēus
Fangyun Tian, Tiecheng Liu, Gang Xu, Duan Li, Talha Ghazi, Trevor Shick, Azeem Sajjad, Michael M Wang, Peter Farrehi, Jimo Borjigin
Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States. The neurophysiological mechanism underlying sudden death is not well understood. Previously we have shown that the brain is highly stimulated in dying animals and that asphyxia-induced death could be delayed by blocking the intact brain-heart neuronal connection. These studies suggest that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in mediating sudden cardiac arrest. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of phentolamine and atenolol, individually or combined, in prolonging functionality of the vital organs in CO2 -mediated asphyxic cardiac arrest model...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
Candace M Reno, Allie Skinner, Justin Bayles, Y Stefanie Chen, Dorit Daphna-Iken, Simon J Fisher
We previously demonstrated that insulin induced severe hypoglycemia associated sudden death is largely mediated by fatal cardiac arrhythmias. In the current study, a pharmacological approach was taken to explore the potential contribution of hypoglycemic seizures and the sympathoadrenergic system in mediating severe hypoglycemia associated sudden death. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into one of four treatment groups: 1) saline (SAL), 2) anti-arrhythmic (β1 blocker atenolol), 3) anti-seizure (Levetiracetam), and 4) combination anti-arrhythmic+anti-seizure (β1 blocker+Levetiracetam)...
February 27, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism
Dong-Bo Ding, Liang-Liang Fan, Zhen Xiao, Hao Huang, Ya-Qin Chen, Shuai Guo, Zhong-Hua Liu, Rong Xiang
Background: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurs in a broad spectrum of cardiac pathologies and is an important cause of mortality in the general population. Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) is a rare but important factor resulting in SCD. It is diagnosed in a resuscitated cardiac arrest victim underlying unknown cause, with documented ventricular fibrillation. Previous studies have demonstrated that mutations in dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein-6 (DPP6) and cardiac sodium channel Nav1...
February 20, 2018: QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians
Daniela Aschieri, Diego Penela, Valentina Pelizzoni, Federico Guerra, Anna Chiara Vermi, Luca Rossi, Lucia Torretta, Giulia Losi, Giovanni Quinto Villani, Alessandro Capucci
OBJECTIVE: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a rare but tragic event during amateur sports activities. Our aim is to analyse whether availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in amateur sports centres could impact on SCA survival. METHODS: This is an observational study. During an 18-year period, data regarding exercise-related SCA in sports centres were prospectively collected. Survival rates and time to response were compared between centres with an AED already available and centres where an AED was not already present...
February 20, 2018: Heart: Official Journal of the British Cardiac Society
Suraj Kapa, Vaibhav Vaidya, David O Hodge, Christopher J McLeod, Heidi M Connolly, Carole A Warnes, Samuel J Asirvatham
BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether systemic right ventricular (SRV) dysfunction confers increased risk for sudden death in congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA). We sought to define risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death attributable to systemic right ventricular dysfunction in ccTGA. METHODS: The study cohort is comprised of adult patients with a diagnosis of ccTGA. Clinical information and clinical outcomes including ICD therapy, incidence of VT/VF, and cause of death were reviewed...
January 31, 2018: International Journal of Cardiology
James Xu, Leia Hee, Andrew Hopkins, Craig P Juergens, Sidney Lo, John K French, Christian J Mussap
BACKGROUND: Immediate cardiac catheterisation (CC) is recommended in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) following sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Guidelines advise urgent CC for SCA patients without-STEMI, at clinician discretion. We examined the clinical and angiographic factors predicting mortality in SCA patients having CC. METHODS: Consecutive SCA patients having CC at Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (January 2011-September 2015) were retrospectively analysed...
February 8, 2018: Heart, Lung & Circulation
Cosmin Balan, Adrian View-Kim Wong
Catecholamines are entrenched in the management of shock states. A paradigm shift has pervaded the critical care arena in recent years acknowledging their propensity to cause harm and fuel a 'death-spiral'. We present the case of a 21-year-old male following a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and standard advanced life support for refractory ventricular fibrillation until return of spontaneous circulation after 70 min. Early post-admission echocardiography revealed severe diffuse sub-basal left ventricular hypertrophy with dynamic mid-cavity obstruction and akinetic apical pouching...
February 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
Amit Vora, Nitin Burkule, Ashish Contractor, Kartikeya Bhargava
The annual incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes is significantly lower than the general population. However, when SCD occurs in an athlete during sporting event or training, it sends shockwaves in the society and raises questions about cardiovascular effects of sports and exercise. This document reviews the causes and mechanism of SCD in sports and exercise in young and older athletes. In the Indian context, we suggest a 'pre-participation screening' of young and older athletes and consider a 'supervised, graded exercise regime' for the uninitiated, older sports participant...
January 2018: Indian Heart Journal
Manuela Malsy, Richard Leberle, Bernhard Graf
BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death is one of the most frequent causes of death in Germany and the third leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Yet, the percentage of people providing first aid in the case of sudden cardiac arrest in Germany is alarmingly low by international comparison. Training Germans or reminding them of the simple but effective steps of resuscitation, so that everybody can save a live in an emergency. METHODS: For the campaign 'Resuscitation Week', physicians and paramedics trained passers-by in cardiovascular resuscitation free of charge...
February 17, 2018: International Journal of Emergency Medicine
Charles E Leonard, Colleen M Brensinger, Christina L Aquilante, Warren B Bilker, Denise M Boudreau, Rajat Deo, James H Flory, Joshua J Gagne, Margaret J Mangaali, Sean Hennessy
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between individual antidiabetic sulfonylureas and outpatient-originating sudden cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia (SCA/VA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using 1999-2010 U.S. Medicaid claims from five large states. Exposures were determined by incident use of glyburide, glimepiride, or glipizide. Glipizide served as the reference exposure, as its effects are believed to be highly pancreas specific...
February 2, 2018: Diabetes Care
Hans Wildiers, Konstantinos Tryfonidis, Lissandra Dal Lago, Peter Vuylsteke, Giuseppe Curigliano, Simon Waters, Barbara Brouwers, Sevilay Altintas, Nathan Touati, Fatima Cardoso, Etienne Brain
BACKGROUND: Despite the high incidence of metastatic breast cancer and its related mortality in the elderly population, our knowledge about optimal treatment for older patients with cancer is far from adequate. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of dual anti-HER2 treatment with or without metronomic chemotherapy in older patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 2 trial in 30 centres from eight countries in Europe, in patients with histologically proven, HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, without previous chemotherapy for metastatic disease, who were 70 years or older, or 60 years or older with confirmed functional restrictions defined by protocol, and had a life expectancy of more than 12 weeks and a performance status according to WHO scale of 0-3...
February 9, 2018: Lancet Oncology
Jonathan W Waks, Alfred E Buxton
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for ∼50% of mortality after myocardial infarction (MI). Most SCDs result from ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and the tachycardias that precipitate cardiac arrest result from multiple mechanisms. As a result, it is highly unlikely that any single test will identify all patients at risk for SCD. Current guidelines for use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) to prevent SCD are based primarily on measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Although reduced LVEF is associated with increased total cardiac mortality after MI, the focus of current guidelines on LVEF omits ∼50% of patients who die suddenly...
January 29, 2018: Annual Review of Medicine
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