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staphylococcus bacteremia

Lemuel R Non, Carlos A Q Santos
BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus with similar virulence characteristics as S. aureus. Whether S. lugdunensis causes infective endocarditis (IE) in a similar proportion of cases as S. aureus (reported to be 12.6% in a definitive multicenter prospective study) is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with at least one blood culture positive for S. lugdunensis at our institution from January 2006 to December 2014...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Infection
Elizabeth A Neuner, Andrea M Pallotta, Simon W Lam, David Stowe, Steven M Gordon, Gary W Procop, Sandra S Richter
OBJECTIVE To describe the impact of rapid diagnostic microarray technology and antimicrobial stewardship for patients with Gram-positive blood cultures. DESIGN Retrospective pre-intervention/post-intervention study. SETTING A 1,200-bed academic medical center. PATIENTS Inpatients with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. anginosus, Streptococcus spp., and Listeria monocytogenes during the 6 months before and after implementation of Verigene Gram-positive blood culture microarray (BC-GP) with an antimicrobial stewardship intervention...
November 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Nicolás M Vázquez, Graciela Fiorilli, Paulo A Cáceres Guido, Silvia Moreno
BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is resistant to different commonly used antibiotics, stressing the need for further strategies to treat this human pathogen with worldwide prevalence. The use of phytochemicals within the current pharmacology is a promising approach to enhance the antimicrobial activity of common antibiotics in the battle against these bacteria. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial effectiveness of carnosic acid, the major constituent of Rosmarinus officinalis L...
November 15, 2016: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology
Insa Joost, Johannes Steinfurt, Philipp T Meyer, Winfried V Kern, Siegbert Rieg
BACKGROUND: Ustekinumab (Stelara®), a human monoclonal antibody targeting the p40-subunit of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23, is indicated for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In large multicenter, prospective trials assessing efficacy and safety of ustekinumab increased rates of severe infections have not been observed so far. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we report the case of a 64-year old woman presenting with chills, pain and swelling of her right foot with dark maculae at the sole, and elevated inflammatory markers...
October 20, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Yuji Watanabe, Nozomi Oikawa, Maya Hariu, Ryota Fuke, Masafumi Seki
Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein serve as biomarkers of infection in patients with sepsis/bacteremia. The present study assessed the clinical characteristics of 280 patients with suspected sepsis who were admitted to Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. Among the patients, 133 and 147 were positive and negative for PCT, respectively. Patients who were PCT positive were older and more frequently male, had reduced levels of platelets and albumin, and increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein...
2016: International Journal of General Medicine
Anca Meda Georgescu, Leonard Azamfirei, Krisztina Szalman, Edit Szekely
BACKGROUND: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. CASE: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review.The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Bryce T Fukunaga, Wesley K Sumida, Deborah A Taira, James W Davis, Todd B Seto
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) results in almost half of all deaths caused by antibiotic resistant organisms. Current evidence suggests that MRSA infections are associated with antibiotic use. This study examined state-level data to determine whether outpatient antibiotic use was associated with hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. The 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Healthcare-Associated Infections Progress Report was used to obtain HA-MRSA infection rates...
October 2016: Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health: a Journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health
Guillaume Butler-Laporte, Matthew P Cheng, Alexandre P Cheng, Emily G McDonald, Todd C Lee
BACKGROUND: Bloodstream infections with Staphylococcus aureus are clinically significant and are often treated with empiric methicillin resistance (MRSA) coverage. However, vancomycin has associated harms. We hypothesized that MRSA screening correlated with resistance in S. aureus bacteremia and could help determine empiric vancomycin requirement. METHODS: We reviewed consecutive S. aureus bacteremias over a five-year period at two tertiary care hospitals. MRSA colonization was evaluated in three ways: as tested within 30 days of bacteremia (30-Day criteria), as tested within 30 days but accounting for any prior positive results (ever positive criteria), or if the patient was known positive with patients with unknown MRSA status being labeled negative (known positive criteria)...
October 10, 2016: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Rajeev Soman, Neha Gupta, Mitesh Suthar, Jatin Kothari, Alan Almeida, Anjali Shetty, Camilla Rodrigues
BACKGROUND: Central-line-associated blood-stream infection (CLABSI) is a highly consequential nosocomial infection. The most effective management includes the removal of the infected catheter. Retention of the catheter and antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) along with systemic antibiotics may be attempted only if there are unusual extenuating circumstances. CLABSIs due to Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) is more common in our setting and the organisms are often highly resistant. Hence, there is a need to explore the use of novel antimicrobials for catheter lock solutions along with antibiofilm agents...
February 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Miki Nagao, Masaki Yamamoto, Yasufumi Matsumura, Isao Yokota, Shunji Takakura, Satoshi Teramukai, Satoshi Ichiyama
PURPOSE: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a serious clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that adherence to evidence-based quality-of-care indicators (QCIs) for the management of SAB could result in reduced mortality. We aimed to determine whether compliance with QCIs was associated with mortality and whether compliance with QCIs predicted the mortality of patients with SAB. METHODS: In a university hospital in Kyoto, Japan, SAB patients, who survived at least 14 days after positive blood cultures were analyzed from 2006 to 2014 to assess their compliance with QCIs and the trend in mortality...
October 5, 2016: Infection
Michelle Oyeka, Suresh Antony
Bacteremia is usually caused by gram-positive organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus or β hemolytic streptococci. While there is a wealth of information that exits for these types of bacteremia, less is available to address bacteremia that is caused by less common bacteria such as Citrobacter. We report an unusual case of Citrobacter braakii bacteremia in a patient with multiple comorbidities that presented to the hospital with cellulitis and pleural effusion. Blood cultures grew Citrobacter braakii. Despite good response to antibiotic treatment, the patient's infection proved to be persistent and he succumbed to the cirrhosis of the liver and subsequent renal failure...
September 20, 2016: Infectious Disorders Drug Targets
June Young Chun, Hye Kyung Seo, Min-Kyung Kim, Myoung Jin Shin, Su Young Kim, Moonsuk Kim, Chung-Jong Kim, Kyoung-Ho Song, Eu Suk Kim, Heeyoung Lee, Hong Bin Kim
BACKGROUND: Hand hygiene (HH) is the most important factor affecting health care-associated infections. METHODS: We introduced a World Health Organization HH campaign in October 2010. The monthly procurement of hand sanitizers per 1,000 patient days was calculated, and the monthly incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MRSAB), classified into community- and hospital-onset (HO), was measured from a microbiologic laboratory database. Trends of MRSAB incidence were assessed using Bayesian structural time series models...
September 19, 2016: American Journal of Infection Control
Mohamad G Fakih, Boguslow Skierczynski, Angelo Bufalino, Clariecia Groves, Phillip Roberts, Michelle Heavens, Ann Hendrich, Ziad Haydar
BACKGROUND: The standardized infection ratio (SIR) evaluates individual publicly reported health care-associated infections, but it may not assess overall performance. METHODS: We piloted an infection composite score (ICS) in 82 hospitals of a single health system. The ICS is a combined score for central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, colon and abdominal hysterectomy surgical site infections, and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Clostridium difficile infections...
September 16, 2016: American Journal of Infection Control
Munehiro Furuichi, Isao Miyairi
BACKGROUND: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) is the predominant cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). Infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) often suffer from CoNS CRBSI, which are often refractory to treatment. OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate risk factors for developing persistent bacteremia due to CoNS CRBSI in infants, in order to identify those who require early aggressive management. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective case-control study of infants in the NICU who developed CRBSI due to CoNS...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Maud Foissac, Maria Lekaditi, Bouchra Loutfi, Agnès Ehrhart, Frédéric-Antoine Dauchy
INTRODUCTION: Staphylococcus hyicus is a coagulase-variable Staphylococcus spp. well-known by veterinarians since it is the major agent of a severe cutaneous infection in piglets called exudative epidermitis. In other species the symptoms of infection are quite different. Human cases are uncommon but seem to occur more frequently after repeated contacts with farm animals. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 58-year-old man suffering from debilitating subacute lumbar pain, in whom diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis was based on spine MRI and positive microbiological results...
September 2016: Germs
S Rieg, I Joost, V Weiß, G Peyerl-Hoffmann, C Schneider, M Hellmich, H Seifert, W V Kern, A Kaasch
OBJECTIVES: The evidence for using combination antimicrobial therapy (CoRx) in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is limited. We aimed to investigate whether CoRx is associated with higher survival or lower SAB-related late complications. METHODS: We performed a post hoc analysis of a prospective SAB cohort study. CoRx was defined as a cell wall-active antistaphylococcal agent plus either rifampicin, a fluoroquinolone, fosfomycin or an aminoglycoside. To adjust for survivor bias multivariable Cox models that included CoRx as a time-dependent covariable were calculated...
September 8, 2016: Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Hideo Shiohira, Masashi Nakamatsu, Yuya Kise, Futoshi Higa, Masao Tateyama, Nobuo Hokama, Yukio Kuniyoshi, Shinichiro Ueda, Katsunori Nakamura, Jiro Fujita
Teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is recommended for therapeutic drug monitoring during treatment. Maintaining a high trough range of teicoplanin is also recommended for severe infectious disease. However, the optimal dose and interval of treatment for severe renal impairment is unknown. We report a 79-year-old man who received long-term teicoplanin treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia due to postoperative sternal osteomyelitis with renal impairment...
2016: Yakugaku Zasshi: Journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan
Riad Khatib, Mamta Sharma, Leonard B Johnson, Kathleen Riederer, Laurence Briski
Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is usually monomicrobial (M-SAB). We reviewed SAB in adults (≥18years old) over a 13year-period and compared polymicrobial (P-SAB) and M-SAB. We encountered 93 P-SAB among 1537 SAB cases (6.1%). The source distribution was comparable; however, source-specified differences were apparent. P-SAB was noted in 12/58 (20.7%) necrotizing soft tissue infections/sacral decubiti and foot gangrene vs. 1/122 (0.8%) cellulitis/abscesses (P<0.001), in 7/64 (10.9%) femoral intravascular catheters (IVC) vs...
November 2016: Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
George Sakoulas, Joshua Olson, Juwon Yim, Niedita B Singh, Monika Kumaraswamy, Diana T Quach, Michael J Rybak, Joseph Pogliano, Victor Nizet
BACKGROUND: Ertapenem and cefazolin were used in combination to successfully clear refractory methicillin-susceptible Staphylcoccus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. In addition, recent work has demonstrated acitivity of combination beta-lactam therapy from different classes against MRSA. METHODS: Ertapenem plus cefazolin combination was evaluated for synergy in vitro and in vivo in a murine skin infection model using an index MSSA bloodstream isolate from a patient in whom persistent bacteremia was cleared with this combination, and against a cadre of well-described research strains and clinical strains of MSSA and MRSA...
August 29, 2016: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Yuliya Zboromyrska, Cristina De la Calle, Marcelo Soto, Laura Sampietro-Colom, Alex Soriano, Míriam José Alvarez-Martínez, Manel Almela, Francesc Marco, Ruth Arjona, Nazaret Cobos-Trigueros, Laura Morata, José Mensa, José Antonio Martínez, Aurea Mira, Jordi Vila
Catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients, being staphylococci the main etiologic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the use of a PCR-based assay for detection of staphylococci directly from blood obtained through the catheter to diagnose CRB caused by these microorganisms and to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis. A total of 92 patients with suspected CRB were included in the study. Samples were obtained through the catheter...
2016: PloS One
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