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Auditory alarms

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29080147/non-invasive-intraoperative-monitoring-of-cochlear-function-by-cochlear-microphonics-during-cerebellopontine-angle-surgery
#1
Blandine Lourenço, Béatriz Madero, Stéphane Tringali, Xavier Dubernard, Toufic Khalil, André Chays, Arnaud Bazin, Thierry Mom, Paul Avan
In vestibular-schwannoma (VS) surgery, hearing-preservation rate remains low. Besides damage to the cochlear nerve, intraoperative cochlear ischemia is a potential cause of hearing loss. Here, we used non-invasive cochlear microphonic (CM) recordings to detect the cochlear vascular events of VS surgery. Continuous intraoperative CM monitoring, in response to 80-95 dB SPL, 1-kHz tone-bursts, was performed in two samples of patients undergoing retrosigmoid cerebellopontine-angle surgery: one for VS (n = 31) and one for vestibular neurectomy or vasculo-neural conflict causing intractable trigeminal neuralgia, harmless to hearing (n = 19, control group)...
October 27, 2017: European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29045578/effectiveness-of-enhanced-pulse-oximetry-sonifications-for-conveying-oxygen-saturation-ranges-a-laboratory-comparison-of-five-auditory-displays
#2
E Paterson, P M Sanderson, N A B Paterson, R G Loeb
Background: Anaesthetists monitor auditory information about a patient's vital signs in an environment that can be noisy and while performing other cognitively demanding tasks. It can be difficult to identify oxygen saturation (SpO2) values using existing pulse oximeter auditory displays (sonifications). Methods: In a laboratory setting, we compared the ability of non-clinician participants to detect transitions into and out of an SpO2 target range using five different sonifications while they performed a secondary distractor arithmetic task in the presence of background noise...
October 13, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967763/effects-of-learning-on-somatosensory-decision-making-and-experiences
#3
Akib Ul Huque, Ellen Poliakoff, Richard J Brown
Operant conditioning has been shown to influence perceptual decision making in the auditory and visual modalities but the effects of conditioning on touch perception are unknown. If conditioning can be used to reduce the tendency to misinterpret somatic noise as signal (tactile false alarms), there may be the potential to use similar procedures in the treatment of excessive physical symptom reporting in clinical settings. We explored this possibility in 4 experiments investigating whether the false alarm (FA) rate in a somatic signal detection task (SSDT) could be altered with operant conditioning, and whether the resultant learning would transfer to other sensory decisions...
October 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813033/a-vision-based-wayfinding-system-for-visually-impaired-people-using-situation-awareness-and-activity-based-instructions
#4
Eunjeong Ko, Eun Yi Kim
A significant challenge faced by visually impaired people is 'wayfinding', which is the ability to find one's way to a destination in an unfamiliar environment. This study develops a novel wayfinding system for smartphones that can automatically recognize the situation and scene objects in real time. Through analyzing streaming images, the proposed system first classifies the current situation of a user in terms of their location. Next, based on the current situation, only the necessary context objects are found and interpreted using computer vision techniques...
August 16, 2017: Sensors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28753163/cortical-processing-of-vocal-and-nonvocal-sounds-in-cochlear-implanted-children-an-electrophysiological-study
#5
David Bakhos, John Galvin, Sylvie Roux, Emmanuel Lescanne, Nicole Bruneau
OBJECTIVES: For prelingually deaf children, cochlear implants (CIs) can restore auditory input to the auditory cortex and the ability to acquire spoken language. Language development is strongly intertwined with voice perception. The aim of this electrophysiological study was to investigate human voice processing using measures of cortical auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in pediatric CI users. DESIGN: Cortical AEPs were measured in 8 CI children (4 to 12 years old) with good auditory and language performance and 8 normal-hearing (NH) age-matched controls...
July 27, 2017: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744950/neural-signature-of-inattentional-deafness
#6
Gautier Durantin, Frederic Dehais, Nicolas Gonthier, Cengiz Terzibas, Daniel E Callan
Inattentional deafness is the failure to hear otherwise audible sounds (usually alarms) that may occur under high workload conditions. One potential cause for its occurrence could be an attentional bottleneck that occurs when task demands are high, resulting in lack of resources for processing of additional tasks. In this fMRI experiment, we explore the brain regions active during the occurrence of inattentional deafness using a difficult perceptual-motor task in which the participants fly through a simulated Red Bull air race course and at the same time push a button on the joystick to the presence of audio alarms...
July 26, 2017: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28650259/locomotor-effects-of-a-low-frequency-fire-alarm-on-c57bl-6-male-mice-a-preliminary-study
#7
Jessica M Povroznik, Robert E Faith, Matthew J Kessler, Frank N Ali, James Kosik, Stephen Prince, Elizabeth B Engler-Chiurazzi
Maintaining appropriate acoustic conditions for animal welfare and data collection are crucial in biomedical research facilities. Negative impacts of disruptive sound are known and can include auditory damage, immune function changes, and behavioral alterations. One type of disruptive sound occurring in research facilities is that of fire alarms. To ameliorate this problem, many facilities have incorporated the use of low-frequency fire alarms that emit tones outside the rodent audible range. The impact of these devices has been assumed to be negligible...
January 1, 2017: Laboratory Animals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28646451/regulation-of-sustained-attention-false-alarm-responding-and-implementation-of-conditional-rules-by-prefrontal-gabaa-transmission-comparison-with-nmda-transmission
#8
Meagan L Auger, Juliet Meccia, Stan B Floresco
RATIONALE: Both prefrontal cortex (PFC) GABAA and NMDA transmission regulate attentional processes, yet how they may differentially regulate signal detection or other aspects of attention is unclear. OBJECTIVES: We examined PFC GABAA and NMDA receptor regulation of attention using a sustained attention task (SAT) permitting identification of distinct forms of impairments. As this task requires implementation of conditional rules, we also investigated how reducing PFC GABA transmission affected performance of visual and auditory conditional discriminations...
June 24, 2017: Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574734/the-recognizability-and-localizability-of-auditory-alarms-setting-global-medical-device-standards
#9
Judy Edworthy, Scott Reid, Siné McDougall, Jonathan Edworthy, Stephanie Hall, Danielle Bennett, James Khan, Ellen Pye
Objective Four sets of eight audible alarms matching the functions specified in IEC 60601-1-8 were designed using known principles from auditory cognition with the intention that they would be more recognizable and localizable than those currently specified in the standard. Background The audible alarms associated with IEC 60601-1-8, a global medical device standard, are known to be difficult to learn and retain, and there have been many calls to update them. There are known principles of design and cognition that might form the basis of more readily recognizable alarms...
November 2017: Human Factors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28570832/spearcons-for-patient-monitoring-laboratory-investigation-comparing-earcons-and-spearcons
#10
Simon Y W Li, Tsz-Lok Tang, Anna Hickling, Szeyuen Yau, Birgit Brecknell, Penelope M Sanderson
Objective We compared the effectiveness of single-tone earcons versus spearcons in conveying information about two commonly monitored vital signs: oxygen saturation and heart rate. Background The uninformative nature of many medical alarms-and clinicians' lack of response to alarms-is a widespread problem that can compromise patient safety. Auditory displays, such as earcons and spearcons (speech-based earcons), may help clinicians maintain awareness of patients' well-being and reduce their reliance on alarms...
August 2017: Human Factors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28462620/cross-modality-translations-improve-recognition-by-reducing-false-alarms
#11
Noah D Forrin, Colin M MacLeod
Conway and Gathercole [(1990). Writing and long-term memory: Evidence for a "translation" hypothesis. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 42, 513-527] proposed a translation account to explain why certain types of encoding produce benefits in memory: Switching modalities from what is presented to what is encoded enhances item distinctiveness. We investigated this hypothesis in a recognition experiment in which the presentation modality of a study list (visual vs. auditory) and the encoding activity (speaking vs...
May 2, 2017: Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391035/selective-verbal-recognition-memory-impairments-are-associated-with-atrophy-of-the-language-network-in-non-semantic-variants-of-primary-progressive-aphasia
#12
Aneesha S Nilakantan, Joel L Voss, Sandra Weintraub, M-Marsel Mesulam, Emily J Rogalski
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is clinically defined by an initial loss of language function and preservation of other cognitive abilities, including episodic memory. While PPA primarily affects the left-lateralized perisylvian language network, some clinical neuropsychological tests suggest concurrent initial memory loss. The goal of this study was to test recognition memory of objects and words in the visual and auditory modality to separate language-processing impairments from retentive memory in PPA...
June 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260156/attention-and-pain-are-auditory-distractors-special
#13
Page Sloan, Mark Hollins
It is well established that manipulations of attention and emotional state can modulate pain. Some researchers have used olfactory or visual distractors to manipulate these factors in combination, and have found that attention and emotion have different effects on pain intensity and unpleasantness. Specifically, distraction from pain was found to markedly reduce its intensity while having little effect on its unpleasantness. Other evidence indicates, however, that the strength of intermodal attentional shifts depends on the specific modalities involved, with auditory-somesthetic shifts being relatively weak...
May 2017: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219399/noninvasive-detection-of-alarming-intracranial-pressure-changes-by-auditory-monitoring-in-early-management-of-brain-injury-a-prospective-invasive-versus-noninvasive-study
#14
Fabrice Giraudet, François Longeras, Aurélien Mulliez, Aurélie Thalamy, Bruno Pereira, Paul Avan, Laurent Sakka
BACKGROUND: In brain-injured patients intracranial pressure (ICP) is monitored invasively by a ventricular or intraparenchymal transducer. The procedure requires specific expertise and exposes the patient to complications such as malposition, hemorrhage or infection. As inner-ear fluid compartments are connected to the cerebrospinal fluid space, ICP changes elicit subtle changes in the physiology of the inner ear. Notably, we previously demonstrated that the phase of cochlear microphonic potential (CM) generated by sound stimuli rotates with ICP...
February 21, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28189059/augmented-reality-warnings-in-vehicles-effects-of-modality-and-specificity-on-effectiveness
#15
Felix Schwarz, Wolfgang Fastenmeier
In the future, vehicles will be able to warn drivers of hidden dangers before they are visible. Specific warning information about these hazards could improve drivers' reactions and the warning effectiveness, but could also impair them, for example, by additional cognitive-processing costs. In a driving simulator study with 88 participants, we investigated the effects of modality (auditory vs. visual) and specificity (low vs. high) on warning effectiveness. For the specific warnings, we used augmented reality as an advanced technology to display the additional auditory or visual warning information...
April 2017: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27931901/auditory-false-perception-in-schizophrenia-development-and-validation-of-auditory-signal-detection-task
#16
Harleen Chhabra, Selvaraj Sowmya, Vanteemar S Sreeraj, Sunil V Kalmady, Venkataram Shivakumar, Anekal C Amaresha, Janardhanan C Narayanaswamy, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian
Auditory hallucinations constitute an important symptom component in 70-80% of schizophrenia patients. These hallucinations are proposed to occur due to an imbalance between perceptual expectation and external input, resulting in attachment of meaning to abstract noises; signal detection theory has been proposed to explain these phenomena. In this study, we describe the development of an auditory signal detection task using a carefully chosen set of English words that could be tested successfully in schizophrenia patients coming from varying linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds...
December 2016: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910865/auditory-evoked-potential-could-reflect-emotional-sensitivity-and-impulsivity
#17
Ji Sun Kim, Sungkean Kim, Wookyoung Jung, Chang-Hwan Im, Seung-Hwan Lee
Emotional sensitivity and impulsivity could cause interpersonal conflicts and neuropsychiatric problems. Serotonin is correlated with behavioral inhibition and impulsivity. This study evaluated whether the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP), a potential biological marker of central serotonergic activity, could reflect emotional sensitivity and impulsivity. A total of 157 healthy individuals were recruited, who performed LDAEP and Go/Nogo paradigms during electroencephalogram measurement...
December 2, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889770/usefulness-of-discriminability-and-response-bias-indices-for-the-evaluation-of-recognition-memory-in-mild-cognitive-impairment-and-alzheimer-disease
#18
María Julieta Russo, Gabriela Cohen, Jorge Campos, Maria Eugenia Martin, María Florencia Clarens, Liliana Sabe, Ernesto Barcelo, Ricardo F Allegri
BACKGROUND: Most studies examining episodic memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) have focused on patients' impaired ability to remember information. This approach provides only a partial picture of memory deficits since other factors involved are not considered. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the recognition memory performance by using a yes/no procedure to examine the effect of discriminability and response bias measures in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI), AD dementia, and normal-aging subjects...
2017: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869530/composing-alarms-considering-the-musical-aspects-of-auditory-alarm-design
#19
Jessica Gillard, Michael Schutz
Short melodies are commonly linked to referents in jingles, ringtones, movie themes, and even auditory displays (i.e., sounds used in human-computer interactions). While melody associations can be quite effective, auditory alarms in medical devices are generally poorly learned and highly confused. Here, we draw on approaches and stimuli from both music cognition (melody recognition) and human factors (alarm design) to analyze the patterns of confusions in a paired-associate alarm-learning task involving both a standardized melodic alarm set (Experiment 1) and a set of novel melodies (Experiment 2)...
December 2016: Neurocase
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27833872/effects-of-chemoradiation-on-hearing-in-patients-with-head-and-neck-malignancies-experience-at-a-tertiary-referral-care-hospital
#20
Abhineet Jain, Praveer K Banerjee, D Manjunath
Hearing loss as a side effect in patients with head and neck malignancies with chemoradiation is frequently ignored. Its effects on auditory functions are less studied and there are studies done on animals which are less reliable. The present study was undertaken to identify the type of hearing loss and also to quantify the degree of hearing loss in these patients. A prospective, descriptive study was undertaken in histologically proven head and neck cancer patients treated with cobalt 60 teletherapy who received a dose of 60-66 Grays (Gy) over a period of 6-7 weeks with concurrent Cisplatin 30 mg/m(2) once weekly for 6 weeks...
December 2016: Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery
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