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shockwave therapy

Ben H Chew, Dirk Lange
Open ureterolithotomy and pyelolithotomy used to be first line therapy for treating kidney and ureteral stones. With the advent of shockwave lithotripsy, open stone surgery became less prevalent, but once ureteroscopy became more prevalent, open stone surgery became all but extinct. Advances in smaller, more flexible endoscopes and improvements in intracorporeal lithotripters, ureteroscopy has become a mainstay of therapy for kidney stones. The holmium:YAG laser can be utilized through flexible instruments and fragments any stone no matter what it is composed of...
October 19, 2016: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, the Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Min Wei, Yujie Liu, Zhongli Li, Zhigang Wang
BACKGROUND: We sought to compare clinical efficacy among endoscopy-assisted radio-frequency ablation under local anesthesia, extracorporeal shockwaves (ESWs), and eccentric exercises in treating insertional Achilles tendinosis. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 78 patients diagnosed as having unilateral insertional Achilles tendinosis were enrolled. These participants underwent endoscopy-assisted radio-frequency ablation, ESWs, and eccentric calf muscle exercises between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2011...
October 10, 2016: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Corey T Gatewood, Andrew A Tran, Jason L Dragoo
PURPOSE: There is a wide array of device modalities available for post-operative treatment following arthroscopic knee surgery; however, it remains unclear which types and duration of modality are the most effective. This systematic review aimed to investigate the efficacy of device modalities used following arthroscopic knee surgery. METHODS: A systematic search of the literature was performed on: PubMed; Scopus; MEDLINE; EMBASE; PEDro; SportDiscus; and CINAHL databases (1995-2015) for clinical trials using device modalities following arthroscopic knee surgery: cryotherapy, continuous passive motion (CPM), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), surface electromyographic (sEMG) biofeedback and shockwave therapy (ESWT)...
October 1, 2016: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy: Official Journal of the ESSKA
Ching-Jen Wang, Chung-Cheng Huang, Hon-Kan Yip, Ya-Ju Yang
BACKGROUND: This study investigated the effects of different dosages of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in early osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients (42 hips) were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (10 patients with 16 hips) received 2000 impulses of ESWT at 24 Kv to the affected hip. Group B (11 patients with 14 hips) and Group C (12 patients with 12 hips) received 4000 and 6000 impulses of ESWT respectively...
September 21, 2016: International Journal of Surgery
Phil Newman, Gordon Waddington, Roger Adams
OBJECTIVES: Up to 35% of runners develop medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) which often results in lengthy disruption to training and sometimes affects daily activities. There is currently no high quality evidence to support any particular intervention for MTSS. This study aims to investigate the effect of shockwave therapy for MTSS. DESIGN: A randomized, sham-controlled, pilot trial in a university-based health clinic including 28 active adults with MTSS. METHODS: Intervention included standard dose shockwave therapy for the experimental group versus sham dose for the control group, delivered during Week 1-3, 5 and 9...
August 5, 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Jun Li, Jing Xiao, Tiandong Han, Ye Tian, Wenying Wang, Yuan Du
We evaluated the clinical value of flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in infants. Fifty-five infants with upper urinary tract calculi were included in this study: 41 males and 14 females. Retrograde intrarenal surgery was performed by an 8 Fr/30 cm flexible ureterorenoscope (POLY®) combined with a holmium laser. CT scanning or radiography of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder region was performed one month after the operation to confirm the clearance of calculi...
September 15, 2016: Experimental Biology and Medicine
Ingrid Torjesen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Edward W Vogel, Steve H Rwema, David F Meaney, Cameron R Dale Bass, Barclay Morrison
Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a major threat to United States service members in military conflicts worldwide. The effects of primary blast, caused by the supersonic shockwave interacting with the skull and brain, remain unclear. Our group has previously reported that in vitro primary blast exposure can reduce long-term potentiation (LTP), the electrophysiological correlate of learning and memory, in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) without significant changes to cell viability or basal, evoked neuronal function...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Jai-Hong Cheng, Ching-Jen Wang, Shi-Hao Su, Chien-Yiu Huang, Shan-Ling Hsu
Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has shown chondroprotective effects on the initiation of the osteoarthritis (OA) changes of the rat knee. This study evaluated 69 significant expressed profiles of microRNA (miRNA) in the articular cartilage and subchondral bone after ESWT. There were 118 target genes identified for miRNAs of interest in articular cartilage and 214 target genes in subchondral bone by next generation sequencing (NGS). In principal component analysis (PCA), the relationships of miRNA expression in bone and cartilage were improved after ESWT...
August 17, 2016: Oncotarget
Johannes Zwerver, Charlotte Waugh, Henk van der Worp, Alex Scott
Shockwave treatments are commonly used in the management of tendon injuries and there is increasing evidence for its clinical effectiveness. There is a paucity of fundamental (in vivo) studies investigating the biological action of shockwave therapy. Destruction of calcifications, pain relief and mechanotransduction-initiated tissue regeneration and remodeling of the tendon are considered to be the most important working mechanisms. The heterogeneity of systems (focussed shockwave therapy vs. radial pressurewave therapy), treatment protocols and study populations, and the fact that there seem to be responders and non-responders, continue to make it difficult to give firm recommendations with regard to the most optimal shockwave therapy approach...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
J C Angulo, I Arance, M M de Las Heras, E Meilán, C Esquinas, E M Andrés
CONTEXT: The low-intensity shockwave (LISW) therapy is a recently developed modality for treating erectile dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of LISW therapy for treating erectile dysfunction as described in the literature. ACQUISITION OF EVIDENCE: Two independent reviewers identified studies eligible for a systematic review and meta-analysis of various sources written in English and Spanish, using the databases of PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science...
August 9, 2016: Actas Urologicas Españolas
Ezzat A Ismail, Ahmed I El-Sakka
OBJECTIVE: To review contemporary knowledge concerning the innovative trends and perspectives in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). METHODS: Medline was reviewed for English-language journal articles between January 2000 and March 2016, using the terms 'erectile dysfunction treatments', 'new trends' and 'perspectives'. In all, 114 original articles and 16 review articles were found to be relevant. Of the 76 cited papers that met the inclusion criteria, 51 papers had level of evidence of 1a-2b, whilst 25 had level of evidence of 3-4...
June 2016: Arab Journal of Urology
Brittany J Carr, Sherman O Canapp, Debra A Canapp, Lauri-Jo Gamble, David L Dycus
OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical and diagnostic findings as well as management of adhesive capsulitis in dogs. BACKGROUND: Adhesive capsulitis, also known as frozen shoulder, is a syndrome defined by loss of range of motion of the shoulder and may be the end-stage manifestation of several primary conditions. EVIDENTIARY VALUE: This is a case series report of eight dogs with chronic forelimb lameness diagnosed with adhesive capsulitis. METHODS: Medical records (June 1, 2010-September 1, 2015) including, physical examination findings, radiographic findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, arthroscopy findings, and treatment plans were reviewed...
2016: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
J J Leeman, K K Shaw, M B Mison, J A Perry, A Carr, R Shultz
Supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) and biceps tendinopathy (BT) are common causes of forelimb lameness in large-breed dogs and have historically been treated with conservative management or surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and therapeutic exercise (TE) are thought to be treatment options for these conditions. The objectives of this study were to report the clinical presentations of dogs treated with ESWT for shoulder tendinopathies, to determine the association between shoulder lesion severity identified on ultrasonography or MRI and outcome, and to compare the outcomes of dogs treated with ESWT with and without TE...
October 15, 2016: Veterinary Record
Amado Bechara, Adolfo Casabé, Walter De Bonis, Pablo Gomez Ciciclia
INTRODUCTION: Low-intensity shockwave therapy (LISWT) has recently emerged as a promising method in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). AIM: To assess the long-term results of the effectiveness and safety of LISWT in patients with ED who are non-responders to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) treatment. METHODS: This open-label, longitudinal, and observational study investigated an uncontrolled population of 50 consecutive patients whose ED was unresponsive to PDE5i treatment...
July 18, 2016: Sexual Medicine
Qiaodan Ji, Pu Wang, Chengqi He
Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized with pathological changes on articular cartilage and subchondral bone, with clinical symptoms of pain and motor dysfunction in affected joints. A growing number of investigations demonstrated the therapeutic effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on joints with OA. While the partial mechanisms of action are based on cellular mechanotransduction through cytoskeleton into nuclei to regulate gene expression and cause biophysical influences, the efficacy and exact mechanisms are still under exploration...
September 2016: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
Rachel Myers, Christian Coviello, Philippe Erbs, Johann Foloppe, Cliff Rowe, James Kwan, Calum Crake, Seán Finn, Edward Jackson, Jean-Marc Balloul, Colin Story, Constantin Coussios, Robert Carlisle
Oncolytic viruses (OV) could become the most powerful and selective cancer therapies. However, the limited transport of OV into and throughout tumors following intravenous injection means their clinical administration is often restricted to direct intratumoral dosing. Application of physical stimuli, such as focused ultrasound, offers a means of achieving enhanced mass transport. In particular, shockwaves and microstreaming resulting from the instigation of an ultrasound-induced event known as inertial cavitation can propel OV hundreds of microns...
September 2016: Molecular Therapy: the Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
Shaurya Jhamb, Venkat N Vangaveti, Usman H Malabu
Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs) are major complications associated with diabetes and often correlate with peripheral neuropathy, trauma and peripheral vascular disease. It is necessary to understand the molecular and genetic basis of diabetic foot ulcers in order to tailor patient centred care towards particular patient groups. This review aimed to evaluate whether current literature was indicative of an underlying molecular and genetic basis for DFUs and to discuss clinical applications. From a molecular perspective, wound healing is a process that transpires following breach of the skin barrier and is usually mediated by growth factors and cytokines released by specialised cells activated by the immune response, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, phagocytes, platelets and keratinocytes...
June 25, 2016: Journal of Tissue Viability
Tsung-Hsun Yang, Lin-Yi Wang, Yu-Chi Huang, Yiu-Chung Lau
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
M C D Agostino, R Frairia, P Romeo, E Amelio, L Berta, V Bosco, S Gigliotti, C Guerra, S Messina, L Messuri, B Moretti, A Notarnicola, G Maccagnano, S Russo, R Saggini, M C Vulpiani, P Buselli
Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT), after its first medical application in the urological field for lithotripsy, nowadays represents a valid therapeutical tool also for many musculoskeletal diseases, as well as for regenerative medicine applications. This is possible thanks to its mechanisms of action, which in the non-urological field are not related to mechanical disruption (as for renal stones), but rather to the capacity, by mechanotransduction, to induce neoangiogenesis, osteogenesis and to improve local tissue trophism, regeneration and remodeling, through stem cell stimulation...
April 2016: Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
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